The 36 - 4The story behind the comic book The 36 is based on the Kabbalistic belief that there are 36 people in the world upon whom it is saved by their simple existence. As the book states, “In times of need, these people emerge from anonymity to save us.”


This issue changes everything. That’s a phrase that’s commonly stated, but with The 36 #4 creator Kristopher White finds his stride, and the book sings because of it! All of the previous issues of The 36 have been exciting and enjoyable, but with Issue #4, White adds a depth and suspense that pushes The 36 from being enjoyable to being downright addictive!

Resurrection Man with Review52 Catch Up is a series devoted to looking at issues from DC's New 52 and seeing how they're faring now that they're underway, why they're worth reading (or not), and places we hope they will go in time.

 

 

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Mitch Shirley doesn't remember who he is.  What he does know is that he keeps coming back from the dead, and, when he returns, he has a new power.  Now, he's on a quest to discover who he is while avoiding the many factions with a vested interest in harvesting his soul.

 

 

 

SPOILERS BELOW

ChewFanboy Comics Contributor Jason Enright brings you his top comic book picks for the week.

 

 

Chew #25
by John Layman and Rob Guillory

Have I told you all about Chew yet? Chew is awesome. It’s funny; it has an intriguing story and really great characters. Even though this issue is the end of a story arc, it’s still a great one shot issue, too.  John Layman does a great job giving all the information you need to enjoy that issue, while also stuffing each issue full of tons of great ongoing jokes, and telling a really awesome, cohesive long-form story. Rob Guillory’s art can be silly, disgusting, and heartwarming all at the same time. Twenty-five issues in and the creators are still having fun with their characters, and still telling an incredibly weird but super fun story.

 

Man from Space 2MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

The a--hole from space and his snarky, foul-mouthed, intergalactic goldfish return in Man from Space #2, and cartoonist Marc Jackson does not disappoint! Jackson’s weird, off-kilter, sci-fi comedy is still traveling at warp speed, comic book sniffers, with this latest issue introducing clones, more zany time travel, the infamous Doctor Brain, and the *GASP* death of a major character!!!

 

Mass Effect v3 tpbThere is one rule on Omega: “Don't f--- with Aria.” Omega's newest business partner, the human supremacy organization Cerberus, hasn't learned this lesson.  Tensions are running high aboard the station and violence is about to ensue when Cerberus' experiments beyond the Omega 4 Relay go horribly wrong, catching both sides in between.

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

 

AvengersVsXMenSo, Marvel’s big summer event for 2012 starts here with Avengers Vs. X-Men #1. Marvel brings together their top 5 writers and some of their best artists to pit their two bestselling franchises against each other. There has been plenty of debate about Marvel having too many events and how we just finished Fear Itself four months ago and now we are already starting the next event, but Marvel assures that this is the right time for this event, and that they have been building to these events for years.



SPOILERS BELOW

 

Angel and Faith 8Well, Scoobies, the Comic Book Slayer is back with another Angel & Faith review for your comic book sniffing pleasure! The third part of Christos Gage’s ‘Daddy Issues’ is another near perfect issue, with artist Rebekah Isaacs at the top of her game, as well!

SPOILERS BELOW

Huntress with Review52 Catch Up is a series devoted to looking at issues from DC's New 52 and seeing how they're faring now that they're underway, why they're worth reading (or not), and places we hope they will go in time.

 

 

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Huntress travels to Italy to stop a sex trafficking ring but learns there's a lot more at stake.

 

SPOILERS BELOW

Avengers 24.1Fanboy Comics Contributor Jason Enright brings you his top comic book picks for the week.

 

 

Avengers 24.1
by Brian Michael Bendis, Brandon Peterson, and Sonia Oback

This is a big week for Marvel with their big Avengers VS. X-Men event starting with its 0 issue, but, in all the excitement, don’t miss this awesome Avengers one shot. This issue deals with the emotional return of the Avengers' robot teammate, the Vision. I always love the Vision, because he seems to be the most emotional member of the team, and he’s not even a real person, he’s a robot. Yet, in this issue we see him deal with anger, depression, hatred, shock, and forgiveness. Bendis writes some great moments for the Vision in this book, and he really portrays Iron Man, Captain America, and She-Hulk well. He only fell flat with his portrayal of Magneto, who comes off like the villain he was a few years ago, not the repentant, older, and calmer man we often see in the X books. Brandon Peterson’s art is somewhat inconsistent, too. His style works great for the costumed characters, he seems to do very well when a character’s features are partially obscured, but his scenes with Magneto and Tony Stark make Tony look too old and Magneto just looks silly. Even despite a few flaws, this book tells a wonderfully small story of the Vision trying to deal with the emotional fallout of his own death and rebirth, and serves as a nice lead in to the big event books coming our way.

 

BPRD P of F V1"Diamond" David Lee Roth. Steve Perry. Peter Gabriel. Hellboy. Besides all falling under the category of "awesome," one may ask what they have in common. The answer? They may have gone on to interesting, if not magnificent, solo careers, but they left behind groups that could hold their own and persevered without them. Most replaced that lead position, some from within, while others added to the group and came into their own. One of which is The Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense, otherwise known as the B.P.R.D.

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