Avatar V3After the end of the Hundred Years War, rebuilding begins for all of the nations, but a new conflict breaks out surrounding the Fire Nation Colonies in the Earth Kingdom, which are really a blend of both peoples and cultures. The Earth Kingdom wants the colonies rightfully restored to them, the Fire Nation believes they should remain under their protection, and the colonies themselves just want to keep their community together.

The-Avengers-MovieThe Top Four series looks at certain aspects of the comic book world from two perspectives: Rob’s, as a relative newcomer to mainstream comics, and Kristine’s, as an older hand in the world.  Each installment evaluates the top four choices from both Rob and Kristine and why they chose their picks.



By Robert J. Baden and Kristine Chester

 

 

 

The past couple of decades have seen a lot of movies based off comic books coming about, so much so that Marvel has even created its own division and an interconnecting in-continuity universe for such properties (well, some of them).  There have even been some made-for-TV movies and direct-to-video films (such as the DC original animated features), so many that we’ve actually lost count.  Below are the 8 (4 each) films that we believe best represent movies (based on comic books) that one should see.

 

 

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

 

 

 

Sparrow Crowe Issue 2When last we left our hero, occult detective Doctor Xander Crowe was hired by infamous mob boss Don Marino to exorcise the demon possessing his daughter, but Crowe soon learns it's not just any demon, but Adramelech, the same being that left its mark on Crowe years ago.

 

KuzimoSome graphic novels are beyond description. They simply must be experienced. Such books are a rarity, but they do exist. Kuzimu is one of these books. No matter how I describe it to you, to truly understand this insane, free-form, dream-like walk through the afterlife in graphic novel form, you simply must read it.

BW Nite Owl 3The comic book event of the summer is nigh!  Before Watchmen, the much-anticipated prequel series to Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' Watchmen, will consist of seven limited series and an epilogue one-shot.  Stay tuned, as the Fanboy Comics crew will be reviewing each title as it is released. Hurm. 

 

 

“If I were going with you, we'd be dating, so instead I'll just . . . come with you.” Yeah, it's like that. The bulk of this issue is all about Nite Owl working alongside the Twilight Lady. She feels a lot like Catwoman in tone and playfulness, but, unlike Batman, Nite Owl is not stoic or confident but a shy, nerdy mess when Twilight uses her feminine wiles on him. The banter manages to be both funny and sexy all the way to the bedroom with what has got to be one of the best Before Watchmen moments taking place when they need to figure out the . . . er . . . costume situation.

 

Flee coverWhen last we saw Commander Flick Fleebus, he had narrowly escaped the might of the Krill armada with the invaluable Nexus Sphere in tow. Now crash-landed on the strange, forbidden planet Earth, Flick must locate the Sphere, his robotic companion Trion, and find a way off the planet while evading the Krill military. Oblivious to all of this is bug exterminator, Rigby Pinkerton, who is currently living with his mother following his divorce and is trying to find a new purpose to his life.


SPOILERS BELOW FOR FLEE CHAPTER 1

 

Womanthology Space Cover3 . . . 2 . . . 1 . . . lift off!  Womanthology: Space #1 is almost here, and it’s out of this world!  For those that don’t know, Womanthology started with a tweet from Renae De Liz and ended up as a 300-page hardcover comic anthology (Heroic) and now an ongoing IDW series, created entirely by women.  Womanthology: Space is the first, five-issue arc of the series, and it includes work from talented women ranging from pros in the industry to an inspired ten-year-old artist, and contains stories that are exciting, hilarious, and moving.  

 

SW Darth Vader and the Ghost Prison 5And, here we are. The thrilling conclusion to "Vader's Trip to the Ghost Prison." I will be keeping this review spoiler free for you all, since giving away even the smallest detail kind of ruins it for you. So, what can I say about the conclusion then, you ask? As a long-time Star Wars fan and as someone who was hooked on this story arc from the first issue, I can honestly say that the conclusion was more than satisfying. In just 26 pages, all of the loose ends are tied up nicely. Of course, "nicely" in no way reflects the actual characters behavior in any way, but you know what I meant. I hope . . .

 

Doctor Who Dave GibbonsI'll admit that I am not a long-time Whovian. In fact, after putting it off for several years, it wasn't until six months ago that I finally found the time to sit down and see what all the fuss about Doctor Who was about. After only a few episodes into the series, my initial reaction was to hop in my own TARDIS and kick my past self in the butt for not watching it sooner.

Yes, it's THAT good, but, of course, if you're reading this, you're most likely already a Whovian yourself.

 

Danger Girl GIJoe 3As a youngling, I remember walking into my local comic book store and stopping dead in my tracks when my eyes caught glimpse of Danger Girl Issue #1 resting so elegantly on the shelf. And, how could I not? Flipping though the pages, I was treated to incredibly gorgeous women in tight clothing who kicked a-- with a mentor who looked exactly like Sean Connery. And, if that's not enough, these beautiful women were drawn by a then unknown (to me at least) J. Scott Campbell. Looking back on it now, it's incredible how much of what I loved about the series was merely "fan service," but hey, I was 14 and that's all that mattered back then. 'Till this day, I still think J. Scott Campbell is my favorite artist when it comes to the ladies. I remember jumping ship on Danger Girl once a new artist took over, because to me they just weren't the same characters anymore.

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