You don’t often see the characters' eyes in Cold Spots by Cullen Bunn and Mark Torres, but when you do, there’s something that needs to be seen: the thing that they’re looking at and also a glimpse of their humanity. Otherwise, these characters are stepping out of a hard-boiled noir and right smack dab into the middle of a gothic ghost story.

Just when things could not get more exciting in the world of The Ash, the Winters family and those battling for control of their drug empire have a few surprises in store.

I’ve been a Jack Campbell (a pseudonym for John Hemry) fan for quite a while.  I discovered his Lost Fleet military space-faring novels while perusing Amazon, and I read through them as fast as I could get them. My husband got hooked, as well, as Campbell is one of the few military sci-fi writers who depict space battles accurately - meaning that space is a big place, and it takes a long time for messages and images to arrive, as well as using the three dimensions of space in battle strategy.  What I like best about him is that he is living proof that a solid professional writer can get better – a lot better. You can see the improvement in The Lost Stars and The Genesis Fleet series.

The '80s were awesome: Dungeons & Dragons, government conspiracies, secret labs held by evil corporations, parallel universes, strange paranormal powers, monsters escaping into our world, Midwestern small town mysteries involving children, and rad synthesized music scores.

Let’s talk Bock-Darr, baby!

Sean O’Neill is back with his second Rocket Robinson adventure (Check out my review of his first volume, Rocket Robinson and the Pharaoh’s Fortune, here.), and I could not be happier! This Wednesday, you will be too when Rocket Robinson and the Secret of the Saint is released from Dark Horse Books.

Low-tech street kids fight for survival on the cyber-enhanced streets of Lima, Peru, in Gustaffo Vargas’ near futuristic L1MA.

Petals by Gustavo Borges and Cris Peter is one of those books that, at first glance, appears deceptively simple. It’s not. The visual storytelling alone is complex and incredibly well crafted.

If you haven't seen the original Over the Garden Wall miniseries that aired on Cartoon Network, please stop whatever you are doing right now and go watch it. The whole series is the length of a single movie; an afternoon is all you need.

Sitting triumphantly on his command chair, Lord Morgan of the Black Sun Templars surveys the carnage around him during the battle of the White Monk’s citadel. Captain Janek offers his services to safeguard the malevolent leader who overconfidently replies back, “No need. The Black Knight already killed all incoming reinforcements. They’re out of surprises.”  

What proceeds to follow for the remainder of issue five, the final issue of book one of Sword of Ages, is nothing but continuous surprises.

Page 4 of 118
Go to top