The ‘90s were a simpler time, when the general public still wasn’t 100% sure what computers were capable of, and all that a movie character had to say was, “I’m a hacker,” and suddenly they were the most powerful person on the planet. The '90s gave us movies like Hackers, wherein cracking a computer was essentially a video game, and The Matrix, wherein hacking literally gave you superpowers.

What happens when you build your society on the words and actions of a genocidal madman? How do lifestyles and attitudes evolve after generations of fostering that mindset? Lightstep shows us some of the terrifying possibilities.

Who doesn’t love Rick and Morty?!? It’s like, the most popular thing ever, in all of time and space. Season 3 Episode 3, affectionately titled “Pickle Rick,” was an explosive moment in pop culture and basically pervaded over all hip party conversations for a hot minute. This comic book is basically like all of that stuff, but different!

One of the biggest plot points of Bitter Root is that people have to deal with monsters, and not just the ones with sharp teeth that eat little girls (although that definitely is part of the story). It’s about how people fight back against the monsters we see every day, hiding in the dark, lurking behind the scenes, and how we protect our own humanity.

Black Badge by Matt Kindt, Tyler Jenkins, and Hilary Jenkins is just getting warmed up. Gone is the episodic feel of the first three issues, as the hyper-advanced boy scout soldiers begin to unravel a mystery that has already begun to shake their foundations as a no-questions-asked team. With some serious revelations come larger questions and an expanded universe of characters.

Upon finishing The Flutter Collection, you will be filled with a million questions, and none of them will be, “Why did I read this?” You will have questions, though - questions that you will not likely be able to answer. You will need to reach out to others for answers. Thus, you will learn and be made better for it. You will be challenged and be made to overcome these challenges. That is why you read it. To accept others, and be yourself, accepted.

She is a feral child. He is a broken old man. They brandish hot blades. They make short work of nasty, bearded vikings. They take no notice of the blood left behind. Together, they are Sword Daughter.

You can only withhold information from the audience for so long before they start to become impatient. Cullen Bunn, the writer of Cold Spots and many other exceptional horror genre books on the market, was toeing this line while dancing around answers in issue three of Cold Spots. Those questions are answered in issue four, and now the heroes are left with choices to be made. That, to me, is the most interesting part of story. Yeah, a mystery is good, but if it gets in the way of characters being forced to make life-or-death decisions in the moment, then it’s not going to be nearly as exciting.

By now, you've probably encountered Disney’s Tsum Tsum at least once. If you haven't, they're basically a line of tiny stuffed animals that come from Japan based on Disney characters ranging from Mickey Mouse to Iron Man. Tsum Tsum have become something of a cultural phenomenon, leading to spin-off materials of all shapes and sizes, including today's comic: Disney’s Tsum Tsum Kingdom.



Elizabeth Dumn is a rude, 16-year-old, devil-stomping problem child, and it’s time we all start being a little more like her.

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