Brian Haberlin’s telling a story I’ve been looking for for years: science fiction full of exploration and discovery, grounded in a clear interest in real(ish) science, more about the ship, its crew, and the things they encounter than blowing up bad guys. I mean, there are bad guys, and existential threats, and action…but, like in the best eras of Star Trek, these are there to heighten the drama – obstacles to overcome. They raise the stakes. They aren’t the point. There’s an inherent optimism and exceptionalism to it (again, much like Star Trek, to which Haberlin makes overt references on numerous occasions), and when the majority of science fiction offerings in popular culture have been focused on deadly aliens and laser swords for a number of years, Faster Than Light feels like coming home again.

Well, the Cubbies were off by a year of winning the World Series according to Back to the Future, but at least they finally won!  In this day and age, however, you know director Robert Zemeckis and producer Steven Spielberg can release a special edition where Marty goes to the future of 2016 instead of 2015.

What would you and your high school classmates do if you, and your school building, were suddenly transported to an unknown world? What would you do if you were surrounded by a wilderness filled with terrifyingly grotesque creatures that want to devour your flesh?

Wow - that is a whopper of a second issue!  I was expecting something decent, but I wasn’t prepared for something that good.

David Leach is at it again!  Who is David Leach, you ask?  Why, just look at this review (by Yours Truly) to learn a little bit about him.  Anywho, though it might have taken him over two years to publish the next edition of Psycho Gran, this edition (volume 2!) does not disappoint.  For those of you who are really ready to watch some vigilantes kick the ever-loving crap out of some jerk on the street who has it coming, this comic is for you.

Super Terre.r is an out-of-this-world adventure that’s perfectly described by its cover page. Artist Bob Eggleton creates an extraterrestrial vision with several explorers standing in the midst of an alien planet; it’s made apparent by multiple moons or planets in the sea blue sky. The cover also highlights the abundance of foliage, as green moss covers every inch of tall towers, which are yet to be determined if they’re man-made or not.

The world has changed. The sun devastates the world instead of nourishes it. In a flash of sunlight, life can be extinguished, and the remnants are not a pretty sight.

Once again, a new arc of The Wicked + The Divine has begun, and with it comes one of the more interesting additions to the lore of the gods and their brief, but exciting, lifespans.

Once you know your enemy, you’ll not fear them.  Yeah, sounds good.

Schismatic is based on a solid and horrifying premise, where parents fighting against a Lovecraftian cult are separated from their children and spend 10 years imprisoned in mines before managing an escape.  Having sneaked into the heart of their enemies’ stronghold (after making some intriguing allies), they come face to face with their worst nightmare: their children.  Having spent the whole of the narrative with the adults, this issue flips the script and fills us in on what the kids have been going through (now that we have confirmed that they are alive) for the last decade.  It’s not a story of hope, but my goodness is it one that’s thoroughly engaging.

Tomas Ramirez has no aspirations or dreams -- he’s perfectly content to chill at his gas station job and talk to random lizards.  But he finds that the latter has become a lot more literal as some of his fellow townspeople are actually shape-shifting reptilian aliens that want to exterminate humanity.  Soon, he finds himself fighting in a secret worldwide war for humanity’s survival with an underground resistance force.  He’s way over his head, so he does the most logical thing -- get high.

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