Matt Kindt’s most recent book, Ether, finds a scientist from our world venturing into a world of nothing but magic to help solve a murder mystery. This is a weird, wonderful book, and, so far, I like it, though I have no idea exactly what this book is going to end up actually being about.

I like The Spire a lot. It feels big, dense, and lived-in. I’ve been reading a lot of comics that fit into the same broad techno-fantasy genre (It seems like we’re getting a lot these days.), but relatively few produce a world that seems quite so complex as The Spire. This is the kind of world where, though the story wraps up by the end of the book, there’s a real sense that the world goes on. That it existed before this story began and will continue to exist now that it’s over, even if we don’t get to peek into it anymore.

Naughty or nice, everyone bows to the Big Guy.

After the events in Geek-Girl #1, it’s no surprise that Ruby is feeling a little low.  The people she thought were her friends have turned on her, and she’s struggling with the idea that the power glasses reduce her attractiveness.  Best friend and roommate Summer tags along with Ruby on a club night to get Ruby’s mojo back, but it doesn’t turn out at all like the girls expect. But who is the pretty redhead who is way too into Ruby, and why is she so incredibly strong?

Reborn #3 continues along the path set by its creators to generate an amazing story filled with unique characters, wrapped in a dream-like world. Writer Mark Millar and artist Greg Capullo fly our hero, Bonnie, into action as they further introduce her to the wondrous lands known as Adystria.

Hadrian's Wall is now half over with the latest release of the series. That means the investigation into the death of Hardian's Wall crew member Edward Madigan is nearing its conclusion, though the circumstances as to how it occurred are getting more and more complicated.

He stares at you with a wide, ghoulish smile, bold red spectacles, and long, white hair so bright it matches the lightning strikes surrounding him. Aleister Arcane is brought to life with a larger-than-life title character leering over top of a spooky looking house and a horde of morbid monsters staring dead ahead. The light beaming from the many windows of the haunted house matches the same piercing glow of each tentacled or horned creature coming for you.

Battle has started. A spherical spaceship blasts green rays down on the city it hovers above. An insurmountable invasion reaches the ground. Large plumes of thick smoke blanket the city, while the fires cast a red glow onto the invading aliens. These mechanical beings march forward, each with an optical device covering a single eye matching the color radiating from the flames. All of their bodies are some kind of black, slender cybernetics, without any signs of humanity until you meet their gaze - a humanoid head, pale with a blank stare from an uncovered eye matching the robotic expression. This city, the entire world, is dying with a level of chaos brought by this determined, unfeeling race.

In a place where all of your dreams can be fulfilled, would you stay if your soulmate wasn’t there? The Misplaced Chapter 1 presents this premise with visually stunning pages that create a wonderful blend of illustrations one might expect to see in comic books, paintings, and video cinematography. Some of the images look as if they belong on a movie screen when the production company is introduced with unique images to help distinguish its brand. When you think of The Misplaced, you should think of its creator, Chris Callahan.

Which is colder: steel in the snow or the heart of man?

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