Daisy, Esther, and Susan are back for another wild and entertaining story, as BOOM! Studios brings its fans Giant Days 2016 Holiday Special #1. Creator and writer John Allison brings these lovable characters back, but in a completely different way. They’re not friends in this special edition, and the life they’re leading in this bizarre, altered universe doesn’t seem like a good thing.

Is anyone else confused?  Okay, well, not in general.  If that were the case, then I’m always confused.  In this case, I’m talking about the multiple Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle series written by some of the greatest comic book storytellers of our time: Kevin Eastman, Bobby Curnow, and Tom Waltz.  But, hopefully, I am here to clear up any confusion my readers may have. 

Where has Jason Porath’s Rejected Princesses: Tales of History’s Boldest Heroines, Hellions and & Heretics been all my life? I wish this book had been around when I was a young teen; to have been able to read about extraordinary women who overcame adversity and made a positive contribution of some kind that could inspire would have been divine. As the adage goes, better late than never!

Issue #4 of Cullen Bunn’s Conan the Slayer is juicy goodness. I say this not only because of the awesome violence and gruesomeness brought to visceral life by Sergio Dávil (art) and Michael Atiyeh (colors), but because Bunn approaches the goings on with a rhythm and poetry that gives the weight of myth to Conan’s plight.

Clive Barker’s contribution to horror is difficult to understate. His invention of Hellraiser alone puts him in the horror hall of fame. Sadly, most people aren’t familiar with his other work. Outside a few tepidly received films like Lord of Illusions and Midnight Meat Train, his work is generally more of an undercurrent - informing countless other works, but remaining slightly low key on its own. His books are typically massive tomes, which can scare off readers. The Great and Secret Show is a fantastic book, but it is dense at 670-odd pages. Using the word “overwrought” to describe his books wouldn’t gather many arguments. As it turns out, his voluminous novels might just be meant to transition into comics.

It’s been awhile since Earth Alliance #1 came out – some 14+ months.  So, it took me a minute to remember what it was all about, and I re-read Earth Alliance #1 so I could get some context.  For those of you who don’t remember, Earth and an alien species are struggling over energy source-rich planets diplomatically.  Both the humans and the aliens act kind of like a-holes, and the aliens attack us, starting a war.

Venus is legendary. It is what readers expect when they seek out science fiction. It is what writers dream about being able to create, period. Rick Loverd and Filip Sablik, creators of Venus, capture a premise and never let any momentum slip as Loverd, writer of this magnificent mini-series, generates a heart-pounding tale that will leave readers breathless.

I am called Jack.

There's no more seminal series from my childhood than Samurai Jack.  It was on at a time when I was learning what animation could really be, and this show defined it for me.  Genndy Tartakovsky created many shows with iconic status for Cartoon Network, but Jack's tale is one that stands above all others.  With an incredibly rich aesthetic, there is a trust in allowing the visuals to tell a story with dialogue only interrupting the atmosphere when someone absolutely needed to speak.  In fact, in some episodes there was no dialogue recorded by Phil Lamar as Jack and the irreplaceable Mako as the demon Aku.  I can't describe how perfect a show it was; all I can say is that it's on Netflix, so go and be prepared to be blown away if you've not yet experienced it.

I’m a die-hard fan of zombies of all descriptions.  I refuse to admit that we’ve reached “peak zombie” in our pop culture.  That said, I also admit that I’m constantly looking for something fresh in the genre.  This search has led me to 28 Days Later, Shaun of the Dead, The Reapers are the Angels, The Girl with All the Gifts, and so on.

Nothing like the end of the world.  Nothing like it in the world.

Skottie Young brings about the end of Fairyland in the finale of the second arc.  All done, go home.

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