An idea is like a virus.

This was the opening of Inception, and it’s fairly recognized throughout our social spheres today, with a video or work “going viral” being the best potential hope for any creator.  Within this anthology series we get idea seeds from several different and wildly varied creators. We also get some ideas based very much in the abstract, and some who turn those abstracts into something logical and grounded.  The act of creation is often a violent one, with infinite possibilities being whittled down until the story exists as a whole. Once your lead turns into a hero, the choices become “stay a hero” or “become a villain,” and either choice kills the potential of the other side.  This is something the Big Two try to avoid at all costs with many technological, magical, and simply oddball MacGuffins that allow Cap to be Hydra or a whole half of the galaxy to die and it gets wiped clean like an etch-a-sketch.  This isn’t the violent storytelling that often brings out the best kinds of anguish when something ends, but what we have here are four-page arcs that have a small space to squeeze the entire possibility of creation into. There are some bold and ambitious voices doing it.

Hey, Turtles fans!  Long time, no read!  I feel like it was just last week that I was writing about our favorite heroes-in-a-half-shell.  Oh wait…because I was!

My fellow time travelers, I can’t believe that today was the first time I set foot in my local comic book shop all year!  I was so behind in purchasing my latest comics for my ever-growing collection that I’ve especially missed my Back to the Future stories. 

The Life and Death cycle by Dan Abnett has had some really good issues and some very mediocre ones. I feel like the story he had in place wasn’t quite bulky enough for such a long run, and so issues have passed to move some of our intrepid colonial marines from one place to the other in preparation for a better issue. I felt this especially about some of the Prometheus issues and the previous issue of Aliens vs. Predator. But as we near the final issue, Abnett has no other choice but to tighten the noose, and so we have issue three.

For a hundred years, a stone has restored a world from darkness and into the light. A land of misery has been transformed to a place of healing and worship. The struggle to survive against wicked creatures looking to steal your soul evaporated once two heroes placed a broken shard back into the crystal, making it whole again. Life became a “happily ever after” wonder, and never would such heartache return to this world. Or would it?

At the conclusion of Masked #3, when we saw a green, gaseous villain form in front of our eyes, attacking whoever was in his path and then abducting our main character’s sister, Raphaelle, we knew things were about to elevate to a new level in the next chapter. Not only does this creep, “The Rocket,” provide a sinister tone, previously mentioning his desires to be “alone” with her, but he continues this psychotic, unrelenting fixation despite having others attempt to block his tunnel vision.

This comic reminds me a good deal of the webcomic, Girl Genius. Both are set in sort-of-Steampunk worlds (though Girl Genius prefers the term “Gaslamp fantasy”) and both feature young female protagonists who are clever, ambitious, and just waiting to unlock their full potential. Also, both have absolutely fantastic artwork, which is essential in stories like this.

I'm probably not the only nerd who’s been sitting at the edge of his seat, impatiently waiting for March 3rd.  If you’re a gamer like me, then you know I’m talking about the Nintendo system we’ve all been waiting for—the Nintendo Switch!  And, of course, the only game we’ll be playing on Day One will be the long-awaited Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.  But whatever do we do with ourselves in the meantime?

There’s a lot going on in Terminal Point. We’re thrust headfirst into the story right from the start and sometimes have to work to keep up. It’s worth the effort, though. It may be a little overwhelming at first, but as things unfold, we become ever more deeply immersed in the story and the world.

Awhile back, I was given the opportunity to review William Dickstein's Ch05En. In a unique world where science is able to figure out something spectacular, things aren't always as they seem. The world now has access to genetic mapping that can show a person if they have a latent gene, one that will allow for those with the gene to be someone of great importance, including those who have powers. Our lead for this second volume is the same as the first, the feral but soft-spoken Grizz. When we last left Grizz, he had abandoned his life as a teacher and superhero with the Global Heroes Society in favor of long-time lover and, at the time, adversary, Mische. This innovative ending sets up for the second volume of the series, which shows Grizz and Mische as the two are now on the run and attempting to move on with their lives.

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