The social commentary in The Infinite Loop has never been subtle. The first story arc was a metaphor for gay rights, as Teddy and Ano had to choose whether to remain safe by keeping their forbidden love hidden away, or to risk everything by fighting openly for others to enjoy those same rights. Now, “Nothing but the Truth” takes on various aspects of the current political climate, and how the wealthy and powerful use the media to control the masses and distract people from what’s really going on.

In this fourth issue of The Lost Fleet: Corsair from Titan Comics, former POW Captain Michael Geary of the Alliance Fleet has agreed to work alongside former Syndic Executive Destina Aragon. After successfully commandeering a cruiser from a Syndic CEO, the Alliance and former Syndic crew have more trust issues and a new target to deal with.

This world is expanding pretty rapidly, a fact that might not be so much of a good thing. With the beloved Pocket Mortys still being captured, trained, and tortured, a few additional forces have entered the fray, with Beth and her Pocket Jerrys. If that sentence made any sense to those reading it, congratulations, because for those not familiar with the franchise, this can be a bit confusing. Honestly, it can be confusing for those of us who know the show and have played the game. That being said, this penultimate issue looks like its setting up for a huge conclusion. With (Evil) Morty still attempting to escape the grasp of Rick, a plan begins to come together to combine their skills (Morty's relentless spirit and Rick's lack of concern and acts of brilliance) to take on the Council of Ricks: a combined, powerful conglomerate of Ricks who control the entire Morty fighting sport, as well as the other Ricks. Without spoiling too much, this is going to be a major battle, full of more Morty battles, Rick being a jerk, and ridiculous concepts that are bizarre even for this franchise.

Replicator is the brainchild of Australian writer Robert Arnold. Arnold’s creative team includes Bosnian artist Armin Ozdic (named Best Young Balkans Comic Book Artist), colorist Ross A. Campbell who has worked with mainstream publishers such as Image, Top Cow, Aspen, Zenescope, Dynamite, and Action Lab, and letterer Jamie Me (The Forgotten Man, Cavemen vs. Zombies). The first issue has been edited by Nick Glenister and Alison Arnold.  

Rugrats #1 serves as a reminder that there is still a place for Rugrats in our world. It's been a long time since the characters from Rugrats took another form in All Grown Up!, where teenage versions of the characters took focus beginning in April 2003 and lasting until August 2008. It was the next step for the characters but not much was done with them following the series. Tommy Pickles and the gang vanished from pop culture until now with this series. If you read it, you can already hear the voices of the actors who originally portrayed the characters. It's remarkable how much Box Brown, the writer, is able to recreate the voices of the characters. The art by Lisa DuBois also serves to show just how great the story can come about.



In a way, this issue of Dept.H is the beginning of the next story arc in what is an ongoing murder mystery series that is both microscopic and macroscopic, personal and world changing. At the end of issue #18, Matt Kindt left us with a big question mark. Mia - our investigator and daughter of the murdered genius scientist who put together not only the underwater scientific base, but the crew on board it - found herself in a small capsule at the bottom of the ocean with no power and very little oxygen. With her is the remaining crew, one of which may have killed her father. It’s one of those resting moments, where a story plateaus for a moment. In this case, it was quiet…claustrophobic. It ended a section of the story in a way that spelled oblivion.

I think we often lose track of comics that came out in the early 1950s. It wasn’t a great time for superheroes, the medium’s most enduring genre, and historically the publications themselves get drowned out in the story of Fredric Wertham’s Seduction of the Innocent and the firestorm it provoked. At the center of that fascinating story – the controversies and hearings that gave way to the Comics Code – was Bill Gaines and EC Comics, a highly successful publisher of (at the time) horror and crime stories, in particular. Gaines fought against the censorship ultimately imposed by the Comics Code, not just because it meant that many of the books EC published would have to be scrapped – though that was true – but because the censorship was bad for the medium and the goal of telling more mature, involved stories. Gaines lost that fight, and in 1955, the year after the Comics Code Authority banished horror and crime comics (and, really, anything remotely objectionable) to the ether, EC tried to rebound with its New Direction line.

Why do I enjoy the Tomb Raider franchise so much?  I want to say it’s because it reminds me of my grandfather, but it’s really thanks to lessons learned from Lara Croft.  Although, I’m not a fan of Lara in the way that most people are fans of hers, but we’ll get to that…

The Grass Kingdom is a place where people who don’t fit into society - or don’t want to fit - go to live. It’s a haven, a promised land. This has the potential to attract a lot of different types of folks: people who are running; people who are hiding; people who aren’t exactly on the up and up. Like murderers.

Cullen Bunn and Tyler Crook twist a knife in Issue #26 of Harrow County. With the horror, they have brought a wave of melancholy, and when characters begin to lose the things they care about, they become desperate, throwing the chances of victory off ever so slightly. As powerful as many of the characters are in this book, wisdom eludes them. As capable as Emmy is, she is still only an 18-year-old. Imagine trying to figure out who you are while grappling with the powers of a witch - the power to befriend the creatures of the woods, here called haints, the power to create life from the mud of the earth - and then dealing with a family of dimension-hopping gods that want to do away with you.

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