For most of the last few years, the “Expanded Universe” has focused on the continuing and further adventures of the base (and sometimes minor) characters from the original films, and this novel is no different.  Luke Skywalker, Leia Organo, and Han Solo, the heroes of the Rebellion and the founders of a New Republic, have been involved in every single galaxy-changing event since they left the hanger of the first Death Star, their lives defined by the eternal struggle of good versus evil; however, in the face of a new problem that threatens to change the balance of the galactic economy and the stability of the tentative peace, the triumphant trio makes some radical decisions that forever alter the lives of everyone involved.

SPOILERS BELOW

CC2K co-founder and friend of FBC Robert J. Peterson recently released his new novel, The Odds, a post-apocalyptic action-comedy, and I was given a chance to read a copy of the book.

You know how some post-apocalyptic stories feature mutants, some tongue-in-cheek humor, and some wackiness while others focus on the harshness of day-to-day survival and the nitty-gritty serious drama? I'm not s---ting you, The Odds hits both of the extremes.

In the second installation of the Loogie the Booger Genie book series, children's book author N.E. Castle returns with the hilarious and heartwarming book A Very Nasty Cold.  With the return of Charlie, an eight-year-old boy, and Prince Loogar (a.k.a. Loogie), the genie who lives in a tiny bottle in Charlie's nose, the humorous and gross antics of these two characters picks up right where it left off in the first book, Prince of Prank.  This time, Charlie has caught a cold, which makes for quite a bit of trouble for his nose-dwelling genie friend.

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s . . . a book?

Don’t be too disappointed. This is no ordinary, average, everyday book! This an anthology and not just a good one, but a super-powered edition that is able to leap smaller collections of sub-par stories in a single bound! Alright, enough with my cheesy humor. In all seriousness, Super Stories of Heroes & Villains, the new anthology from Tachyon Publications, is flexing some serious muscles in a genre that doesn’t suffer lightweights. Filled with engaging and intelligent stories and featuring an impressive list of contributing authors, Super Stories of Heroes & Villains is one “text-only” volume that has earned a well-deserved place on the shelf in any respectable (and friendly), neighborhood comic book shop!

As I’ve mentioned before, there’s a strange phenomenon surrounding official movie novelizations and how, if they’re written well, they can actually exceed the quality of the film version of the story. (I will direct skeptics, once again, to check out the official movie novelizations of the Star Wars prequels if they need convincing.)  Much like his recent adaptation of The Dark Knight Rises (read my review here), author Greg Cox has done it again by delivering an official novelization of Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel that will surely thrill fans of the film and also most likely sit better with the film’s detractors than the movie itself.

Who Is Killing the Great Capes of Heropa? by Andrez Bergen is a noir-style mystery set in a world of superheroes. It’s pretty hard to go wrong with that combination. But, more than that, it tackles some deeper issues, like good and evil, reality and fantasy, free will, the nature of humanity, and, more importantly, the grey areas surrounding all of these things.

 

House of SecretsAcclaimed, bestselling author Ned Vizzini (The Other Normals - read my review here) has returned to the world of YA fiction once again with House of Secrets, an exciting, new novel co-written by popular and talented Hollywood director and screenwriter Chris Columbus (The Goonies, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone). In a team up that rivals classic co-workers like Batman and Superman and Anakin and Obi-Wan, Columbus and Vizzini combine their skills as master storytellers, crafting a tale of high adventure that is exhilarating, laugh-out-loud funny, terrifying at times, and always captivating.

Hell to PayAfter Nancy Kerr's family is murdered and she is left dying after being raped, tortured, and stabbed, Nancy decides the only possible way she can deal with what's happened to her is to get revenge.

I want to make it clear up front that I have never been the victim of a crime the likes of which Nancy Kerr or millions of other women have been. I've been lucky in that regard, so my opinion on Hell to Pay's message is going to be different from someone who might “get” what Jenny Thomson was aiming for in her book.

 

Complex 90“In one unintentionally comic motion, my audience all swung around in their seats to face me, ready to hang on my every word, minds already dancing with accusations at the same time they were formulating their own finely worded excuses.  It was too bad my buddy Ralph Marley wasn’t here to watch the show. But, Marley was dead. And, that left only me to play Scrooge.”


Detective fiction comes in many flavors.  You've got your dainty Miss Marples, your wise and mysterious Charlie Chans, your erudite Sherlock Holmes, your witty and pithy Nick and Nora Charles, your agoraphobic gourmet Rex Stout, but coming in ahead of all of them in terms of flavor and style, there is only one . . .  Mike Hammer.  As penned by Mickey Spillane, Hammer puts the “hard” in hard-boiled.

 

The Absence of LightAfter being separated their entire lives, twins Rez and Delilah are reunited in New York City, the place where they were born and where their parents were killed, but the one question neither of them have an answer for is what happened that night all those years ago when they were brought into the world? The Absence of Light is one part ghost story, one part alternative lifestyle exploration that explores the themes of identity, loss, and the power of art through poetic language.

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