Hell to PayAfter Nancy Kerr's family is murdered and she is left dying after being raped, tortured, and stabbed, Nancy decides the only possible way she can deal with what's happened to her is to get revenge.

I want to make it clear up front that I have never been the victim of a crime the likes of which Nancy Kerr or millions of other women have been. I've been lucky in that regard, so my opinion on Hell to Pay's message is going to be different from someone who might “get” what Jenny Thomson was aiming for in her book.

 

Complex 90“In one unintentionally comic motion, my audience all swung around in their seats to face me, ready to hang on my every word, minds already dancing with accusations at the same time they were formulating their own finely worded excuses.  It was too bad my buddy Ralph Marley wasn’t here to watch the show. But, Marley was dead. And, that left only me to play Scrooge.”


Detective fiction comes in many flavors.  You've got your dainty Miss Marples, your wise and mysterious Charlie Chans, your erudite Sherlock Holmes, your witty and pithy Nick and Nora Charles, your agoraphobic gourmet Rex Stout, but coming in ahead of all of them in terms of flavor and style, there is only one . . .  Mike Hammer.  As penned by Mickey Spillane, Hammer puts the “hard” in hard-boiled.

 

The Absence of LightAfter being separated their entire lives, twins Rez and Delilah are reunited in New York City, the place where they were born and where their parents were killed, but the one question neither of them have an answer for is what happened that night all those years ago when they were brought into the world? The Absence of Light is one part ghost story, one part alternative lifestyle exploration that explores the themes of identity, loss, and the power of art through poetic language.

 

Pathfinder Tales Pirates HonorIntrigue, deception, and adventure on the high seas. These are the things promised to readers of Pirate’s Honor, the latest Pathfinder Tales novel. Wonderfully, writer Chris A. Jackson delivers all of this and more in his delightful tale of an honorable pirate trying to pull of the biggest heist of his career. This book is an incredible mix of the standard sword and sorcery fare mixed with the kind of suspense and intrigue you’d expect from a Hollywood heist film like Ocean’s Eleven. What really make it special, though, is that Jackson has also snuck in a love story that simultaneously complicates the story and makes it so much more worthwhile.

 

I Dont Want to Go to SleepIt's been a long day and though it's bed time, these kids don't want to go to sleep, because sleeping is boring and they want to have fun, so the moon politely explains all the ways sleeping can be just as much fun through the children's dreams.

 

DW Shroud of SorrowDuring series three of the BBC’s rebooted Doctor Who, writer Paul Cornell adapted his previously published novel, Human Nature, into a two-part episode that became a highlight of what was already an amazing series of an amazing show. After finishing Tommy Donbavand’s original Doctor Who novel, Shroud of Sorrow, I wanted them to do the same for this fast-paced and resonant story.

 

DW The Dalek GenerationThe Doctor has been on many adventures and seen many things, but never in all his days has he encountered a group of people who regard the Daleks as saviors and . . . nice. Doctor Who: The Dalek Generation takes the eleventh Doctor on a whole new adventure as he finds himself in a position where his wits and knowledge may not be enough to save a group of people from themselves.

 

It Is Known II“… pleasing folks like us – the uber-fans who know the books inside and out – is a monumental task in and of itself.  Changes (are) something viewers unfamiliar with the books will have no idea about. Casual readers of the books may not pick up on all these subtleties, either. We of the "uber" are another breed, though. Not only do we pick up on the changes, but we scrutinize them. We question them.

We evaluate them. We deconstruct them. Once in a blue moon, we might even approve of them. But, above all else, we always, always, always discuss them.”

 -Doug Cohen, Page 62


Marc Kleinhenz is back with his gang of Ice-and-Fireheads for another volume of deep and insightful commentary that will not only serve to enlighten their readers, but will also send the casual Game Of Thrones viewer scurrying to buy the books to see what else they are missing out on.

Following the same format as Volume I, this volume gathers together all of his reviews of the second season of HBO’s monumental series and places it in context within the scope of George R.R. Martin’s original source material.

 

Modesty BlaiseIt can be difficult for a comic strip character to catch on with readers, but when the right character does connect with the public, the opportunity for pop-culture legacy is almost guaranteed. Modesty Blaise, the strong, beautiful, and resourceful heroine of her own British comic strip is a prime example. While the character may have been created by writer Peter O'Donnell and artist Jim Holdaway in 1963, just last month Titan Books released their 23rd Modesty Blaise collected volume, Modesty Blaise: The Girl in the Iron Mask. After 38 years in the papers, Modesty Blaise is still going strong in Titan Books’ beautiful reprints, and Modesty Blaise: The Girl in the Iron Mask is sure to thrill those who have a special place in their hearts for this talented British dame!

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

 

Star Wars ScoundrelsProbably the most influential author for me personally within the Star Wars realm is Timothy Zahn, the man whose novels helped to give life to the “Extended Universe” that has made fans all over the world both happy and annoyed with some of the subject choices.  I won’t say that he is the best writer alive, but he certainly is one of the most detailed and enthralling within the fandom of Star Wars.  I’m always excited to read a new work of his when it comes out, so I was giddy when I heard about his latest, Scoundrels, taking a look at some of the seedier goings-on within the galactic underworld.  It stylized itself as being an “Ocean’s 11 type of situation,” and while I agree that it does have a similar feel to a point, there is a lot that differs from Frank Sinatra’s or George Clooney’s portrayal of the thieving mastermind.  I cannot wait to see what else he plans to write . . . just so long as it is good.

SPOILERS BELOW

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