Gabriel and Wendy’s lives felt extraordinarily blessed when they were able to reverse the effects of hypno-touch and cure their myriad of life-threatening cancers.  On top of this blessing, Wendy somehow became pregnant during the worst of her illness, and the promise of a child together should bring them closer together than before; however, Wendy’s healing came at a painful cost: complete loss of her special abilities including the emodar that has been part of her being as long as she can remember.  As she struggles to learn how to interact with her husband and family without the crutch of reading their emotions, Wendy spirals into anger and depression that gets fueled further by bad news about her infant son; however, there are people who still value her abilities over her health and safety, and they will stop at nothing to get her help. Could the unexpected trials help Wendy rebuild herself as a stronger woman who will stop at nothing to protect those she loves?

Jonathan Maberry is back as editor and co-author of V-Wars: Night Terrors (IDW), the third installment of vampire and werewolf stories that began with V-Wars: A Chronicle of the Vampire Wars in 2013. In the original volume, Maberry commenced with the premise that a dormant bacteria was unleashed with global ramifications. And, as with the first and second volumes, Maberry is joined again by leading authors of horror and science fiction, creating an ongoing and ever-expanding tapestry of stories about the Beats (humans) and Bloods (vampires). 

The resources available to creators in the indie comic scene have, at times, been extremely scarce, but the impact of the internet, social media, and the increasingly inclusive and generous mood among industry professionals has de-mystified much of the comic industry’s in and outs over the last decade or so. That said, indie comic creators should never be the types to turn down additional assistance navigating the often “treacherous” waters of the various legal issues and situations surrounding their creations and businesses. The Law for Comic Book Creators, written by Joe Sergi and published by McFarland, offers the type of comic book legal knowledge that is both informative and easily digestible, earning it a well-deserved place on this comic creator’s bookshelf.

Quin Kincaid’s world was shattered by the final events in Seeker, but she’s ready to try to right the wrongs the Seekers have done to the world with her cousin and newly beloved Shinobu by her side. The Young Dread, Maud, gifted the young woman with the Athame of the Dreads, and Catherine Renart’s old journal contains hints of what John’s mother searched for before her disruption by Quin’s father Briac. The truth is more dangerous than any of the young Seekers can imagine, though, and John, Quin, and Shinobu will all be tested as they dig into an ancient secret that could tear their world even further apart.

I have read Calvin and Hobbes practically every day for as long as I can remember.  Once the books starting rolling off the presses, I spent endless hours immersed in Snow Goons and Calvinball, exploring with Spaceman Spiff and hiding from the trustworthy monsters under the bed.

If I were able to craft my own degree in Geek Studies, I would load up on graduate-level classes about Hobbits and vampire slayers and post-apocalyptic survival.  I’d study superheroes and villains, monsters and robots, old worlds and new technologies.  Thankfully, there’s not much need to be hypothetical about the opportunity to study these topics.  There are legions of curious geeks just like me out there crafting opinions, analyzing themes, and bringing scholarly criticism to the wide universe that is popular culture media.

There are two types of stories that I absolutely love: superhero stories and fairy tales. Tales of Superhuman Powers combines them both by putting folktales from all around the world in the context of today’s comic book heroes, from the Justice League to the Avengers.

It’s taken me a while, but I finally sat down and read this Kickstarter-funded tome by Travis I. Sivart and Wendy L. Callahan. Steampunk for Simpletons is a very thorough and delightful book for those looking to dive into Steampunk or at least learn more about the subject. The authors consider this a resource book and rightly so. It pretty much covers every aspect of Steampunk without making your head explode. (Well, almost. They cover a lot in this book.)

The Hunger Games film series may have wrapped up last month, but there’s still a wealth of Hunger Games material for fans to devour beyond the three novels by author Suzanne Collins and the four feature films based upon them. Of Bread, Blood, and The Hunger Games: Critical Essays on the Suzanne Collins Trilogy, published by McFarland and edited by Mary F. Pharr and Leisa A. Clark, is a collection of well-written and thought-provoking essays focused on The Hunger Games series and is a perfect example of the kind of enriching and delicious remedy that will help those fans experiencing the effects of Hunger Games withdrawal in this post-Mockingjay world we live in.

I had the opportunity to review the first version of Adam Korenman’s When the Stars Fade back in 2014, and when I was invited to read the California Coldblood edition, I jumped at the chance to see how the raw nugget of an excellent sci-fic epic had been honed.  All of the potential that I saw in the original shines, and the plot is tightened to create a more digestible piece for readers to process and appreciate. The series has also been converted from a trilogy to a hexology, so the epic has room to breathe a little more and explore some plot points that were almost footnotes in the first version due to the sheer scope of the ambitious storyline.

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