“There is nothing I fear more than someone without memory. A person without memory is free to do anything she likes.” ~ Lord Mokshi, Annals of the Legion


The Stars Are Legion is a new release from Saga Press, written by Hugo Award-winning author Kameron Hurley, whose other novels include the God’s War trilogy, The Mirror Empire, and Empire Ascendant; the latter two titles are from the Worldbreaker Saga series. In this story, readers are transported to a decaying system of worlds s– monstrously huge ships to be accurate – located in the outer reaches of the universe. Sisters by oath, Jayd and Zan are propelled on separate journeys with the same end goal to save their worlds by creating a new one. Each face daunting challenges: Jayd is a bargaining chip in a peace treaty so that Zan can try to successfully enter an elusive world that is the key to bringing about the end of political unrest, war, and division amongst the various worlds.

When I first opened this book, I was thrown for a bit of a loop. It’s published by Dark Horse, so I assumed it would be a graphic novel. It’s not. It’s a regular text novel of nearly 300 pages. Since these require a much bigger investment of time than comics do, I probably wouldn’t have volunteered to review it had I known up front. That said… I’m glad I did. This was a rollicking space adventure that I honestly didn’t want to put down.

Wendy survived being a target of both The Guild and Andre in the final pages of Shadoworld, but it came at an incredibly painful price: the loss of her beloved Uncle Moby.  Her marriage struggled, as well, with the revelation of why Gabriel and Mike are so intertwined; however, Dreamworld jumps forward 2 ½ years with Wendy awakening in a hospital with no memory of anything past her initial examination as Pneumatikon! She faces rebuilding her identity, sense of purpose, and role in a world that continually suffers increasingly devastating natural disasters.  What is the truth behind Wendy’s mysterious memory loss? Can she still be the Wendy Whitley we’ve come to love while integrating deeply with The Guild? Where are the rest of her companions from that horrific battle for independence? Finding the answers will be a wild ride in the pages of Dreamworld!

“Eventually, we started coming across ruins.  Ancient, dilapidated structures once inhabited by Pre-Rising humanity.  They were an inescapable part of any Wasteland Journey. Most Recon and Extermination rangers cut their teeth on these particular ruins, looking for mutant stragglers or bandits hoping to intercept Remnant convoys.  These structures, which included everything from gas stations to schools, were a missed sight.  Most were half-collapsed at best.  Others were eerily perfect, as if their owners had just stepped out for the night.  Driving past them was always a sobering experience, however.  Everywhere were reminders of the days when humanity had been great and powerful.”

Justin Robinson’s novel, Coldheart, introduced readers to the world of the Magi, gods and super-powered beings struggling for control over Earth; however, that novel focused predominantly on the Twins, the powerful beings that claim responsibility/ownership over North America.  The second novel in the series, The Daughter Gambit, is a selection of short stories that provides some insights into the members of the other Magi groups. 

I’m a genre person drawn to fantasy, steampunk, and science fiction, but I had the opportunity to pick up a free download of Shadow of the Knight. On a whim, I got it and discovered it was a nice break from my usual routine. A solidly written, fast-paced psychological thriller, it explores the dark descent of a woman trying to improve her life after surviving an abusive relationship.

Miguel Fliguer’s Cooking with Lovecraft blends the concept of Eldritch-style stories with the ever-popular themed cookbook.  The 96-page work consists of a mixture of short stories and creepy recipes full of ingredients only found in Lovecraft’s twisted world.  The flavor of every piece varies slightly, but they are all tied together with the theme of food or other gastronomical experiences in a very Lovecraftian style.

Ever since I was a kid, I've loved sports. Growing up in the Midwest, it was a way of life. Saturdays were for watching my beloved Michigan Wolverines play football, and Sundays were spent watching every NFL game that was available to us. But over the years, I've realized something: Sports, and football in particular, are difficult to explain. That is even more true when trying to speak to someone who barely knows anything about the sport. So, when I found out that there was a book dedicated to explaining my favorite sport to those who don't know anything about it, I was pretty excited. Thankfully, author Matthew England took on the task.

Fans of Lovecraft literature can be divided into two major factions. The first category are the Lovecraft purists, those folks who hold the works penned by H.P. Lovecraft himself as the only canon worthwhile to read and posit that successor works simply fail to capture the cosmic nihilism of the original texts. The other camp is composed of the Cthulhu Mythos fans, the readers hooked into Lovecraft via its most prominent and popular icon. This camp prefers stories that contain the most recognizable elements, such as the presence of Cthulhu, mentions of Miskatonic University, and throwbacks to the town of Innsmouth. This is a Lovecraft universe shaped by August Derleth beginning in the late 1930s and has been refined and expanded on by other authors since.

Private investigator Nick Moss doesn’t know what a missing tween, a stolen toad familiar, a kidnapped lovely lady with a gill man admirer, and a fifty-foot giantess with a potential vampire admirer have in common, but he knows he has a serious problem.  As the hairiest (and only) human PI left in Los Angeles after the Night War, Moss’ access to…certain sectors…of society is a little limited unless he embraces his inner figurative wolfman and pals around with the lycanthropic cops; however, as his cases become more entwined, the intrepid detective explores the parts of the City of Devils after dark that he never wanted to go. Will he find answers to his missing individuals’ cases, and, if he does, will Moss or his clients want the full details?

  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1  2  3 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
Page 1 of 3
Go to top