The end is here for the Augurs. Whether that means they escape or die trying is up to them, but - either way - they aren’t going back.  Killswitch creators Jefferey and Susan Bridges culminate this intense and politically inspired tale in a climax that ends on a bittersweet note.

Like much of quarantined America, I have binge watched and obsessed over Tiger King. While the craziness and over-the-top characters are fun (and sad), I admire the well-crafted narrative. The people are allowed to slowly reveal things about themselves. Sometimes, they reveal things about themselves that they themselves are not aware of. The story seems to unfold effortlessly. Where the remarkable craftsmanship is, however, is in a narrative structure that, untelegraphed and without fanfare, suddenly upends everything you think you knew about this story so far. (Tiger King spoilers ahead.)

Buddy the unicorn lives in Glow, one of six magical realms throughout the galaxy, and the seat of power for them all. Looked down on by the other unicorns because of the little stump where his horn should be, Buddy longs to prove himself and be considered worthy.

There are times in life when you don’t want to take anything seriously. James Rallison, author and illustrator of The Odd 1s Out: The First Sequel, has hit the New York Times bestseller list doing just that.

Freedom and the search for truth are the underlying themes in this sequel to Margaret Atwood’s book, The Handmaid’s Tale, and the show on Hulu.  A driving force in many people’s lives and aspirations, this story takes us deep into what it means personally for three women whose lives intertwine in unsuspecting ways.

I was not expecting that. I started reading this first issue of Spy Island really having no idea what to expect, but I was not expecting that. And that, folks, that was amazing. The synopsis is in the title. We’re on an island in the Bermuda Triangle, and there are spies, but also - and hold onto your hats - because I’m not going to give away what else is on this island. Why would I ruin that?

Many of the Life Drawn graphic novels from Humanoids have a similar story device to help push the action forward, that of the first-person narrator. We get a firsthand retelling of (sometimes) real-life emotional turmoil, and, because of that, some of the books can start off feeling like an echo of something you’ve already read. This can be both welcoming, like returning to something you love, and at the same time toy ever so slightly with your patience, as you want the book to open new doorways into different lives.

Greetings, fellow Newcomers.  If you’re here, you either saw the second episode of this season’s Westworld and wanted to think about it some more, or you got lost looking for the "Geeky Parent Guide.”  (If the latter, just hit your back button, and then scroll down – you’ll see it.)  But if you’re here for Westworld, then we have a LOT to talk about.

Veda Adeline thinks she understands her world quite well.  As a Basso, her role is keeping her head down to avoid unwanted Dogio attention, carefully following societal rules, and, above all else, never being out before sunrise or after sundown.  Her best friend Nico may be a Dogio, but as they’ve grown up, it’s become clear that they live in different worlds.  A chance mistake throws Veda’s whole world into chaos, and she quickly learns that the night may not be her biggest fear; the harsh rays of the sun can kill as well as nurture.

As we round into the final three issues of the series, it's been quite a ride. From humble beginnings, our duo of bank-robbing sexual deviants has gone through breakups, fights against sexually powered enforcement officers, and so much more. Throughout all of this, the big bad of the series has been Kuber Badal, an obscenely rich executive and operator of BankCorp. who has some pretty sinister ties to our promiscuous heroes. As we get into the very final stages of this series, things have taken a turn, with Suze taking dramatic steps towards ending things once and for all.

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