Things are vicious in the waste, bub.

James Stokoe’s vision for Aliens: Dead Orbit is one of visceral terror. The Xenomorph is nightmare fuel, not because its origins are unknown, but because it spits in the face of what is natural. It laughs at what we know with absolute certainty to be true. They are an aberration of sex and sexuality. Aliens is a highly subversive creation, as it was with Giger’s art. It somehow, more than most things, captures the imagination of its viewers unlike most other cinematic monsters, because it is tangibly amoral. As a species, we mean nothing to it.

It’s been awhile since I’ve read a Mike Mignola book, so I thought I’d give this new run of Joe Golem: Occult Detective a try. I haven’t read any of the other Joe Golem: Occult Detective books, so the title of the book is the only angle I have to understand what’s up going for me. Otherwise, I don’t get a really good handle on who Joe Golem is in this first issue.

Superheroes. Death. Good versus evil. In the comic book world, it’s often you might find all of these characteristics within one comic book. What happens when someone, or a group of people in this case, decide to focus on individual components to make a story interesting and develop enough depth to be curious to see what happens next? In Hiatus Studios does just that with their anthology, Shards: Volume 1.

In the third installment of Anno Dracula, time is pressing forward and loyalties are questioned as Dracula’s tin jubilee nears.  The rebels move forward with their plans, and Croft’s crew remains on their hunt. There’s also the Chinese faction that has emerged as a mysterious third party with a plan of its own slowly unfolding.

One never quite knows when something will change their life. We all have those moments, whether good or bad, but sometimes the cause of the change can be quite surprising. But, a fictional television show? How could that ever impact anyone in a meaningful way? This is the topic of Family Don’t End with Blood: Cast and Fans on How Supernatural Has Changed Lives (edited by superfan Lynn S. Zubernis).

Weavers is not your typical mobster versus rival gang kind of story. This story has a creep factor relatable to those familiar with the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode, “Conspiracy,” or an earlier scene in the film, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Kahn. If you’re not a Star Trek fan, then perhaps think of Spider-Man meets Alien. In this case, your body isn’t bitten by a spider or eventually destroyed once the Alien matures and plunges through your chest; however, a spider does invade your body, giving you special abilities and eventually twisting your thoughts to the will of the collective – the Weavers syndicate. Okay, so maybe the last reference is more of a stretch than the others.

The best way to describe this franchise is “Hogwarts for superheroes.” By taking the DC heroes that we know and love, transmuting them to high school age, and putting them all together at “Super Hero High,” the film definitely gives off a Harry Potter vibe, especially in the beginning. Still, by the end, it manages to find its own footing.

So far in American Gods, there has been very little deviation from the book, but this week the show took quite a few liberties with “Git Gone.”  While this tends to anger purists, they managed to pull it off well and illustrate how adapting a story to another medium can expand it.

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