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Chicken Shawarma

Everyone saves the world just a little bit, every day. You may not be physically saving the planet from a mischievous, demigod half-brother (or maybe you are. Hey, I don’t know your schedule.), but I truly believe we just don’t know the far-reaching effects of even the smallest of our noble actions. Why else would the demigods and superheroes deem us so worthy of saving?

So, why not eat like the superheroes we are, huh? And, I’m sure we could all use some shawarma after a long day of screenwriting panels or cosplay.

I have always had a fondness for Iron Fist, as he was one of my brother's favorite superheroes when we were growing up. I was somewhat excited when Marvel Comics announced that an Iron Fist monthly would be part of their new Marvel NOW! revamp or relaunch or whatever you want to call it, but not nearly as excited as I was that one of my favorite artists, Kaare Andrews, would be both writing and handling the art chores on the new series.  I have been a fan of Kaare's work since Ultimate X-Men and enjoyed his runs on Astonishing X-Men, Spider-Man: Reign, and anything else he has put his artistic stamp on, like the iconic covers he did for The Incredible Hulk and Amazing Spider-Man. Clearly, Kaare has a great love of comics; he took a brief hiatus to direct the film Cabin Fever: Patient Zero and returned to comics afterward (Praise Baby Jesus!), and it shows in the amazing storytelling in his first issue of Iron Fist: Living Weapon

Kaare was kind enough to participate in the following interview.

“You hit me! Picard never hit me.”
“I’m not Picard.”
     -- Q and Commander Sisko


Just in case you have no idea who the Star Trek universe’s Q is, I’ll explain.  First, though, how’d you end up here?  Are you lost?  Wait here and I’ll go and get a police officer to take you home, and, for the last time, stop mixing your medication with scotch.  Anyway, Q is a godlike alien being who walks the line between mischievous and malevolent and takes special delight in bothering Captain Picard.  As played by John de Lancie, Q is one of the more popular and recognizable elements of the twenty-year period of Trek that comprises TNG, DS9, and Voyager.  Me, I’ve never cared for Q.  Nothing against de Lancie or the writing, I just prefer my godlike aliens to be more strange and less preteen-who-really-could-use-his-Ritalin.  It might be because I look at Q as the physical representation of the Trek brass (a.k.a. Rick Berman and Brannon Braga).  Wherever their attention is, like the Eye of Sauron, Q will soon appear, bringing his special brand of malicious whimsy.

You've got to love a book that includes the tagline, "Get in on the ground floor of Marvel's next big franchise."  To be honest, it's hard to get excited about anything "new" and/or "big" from either of the Big 2. DC New 52, Marvel Now? Yawn. But, when Joe "Freakin'" Maduriera is drawing The Inhumans, you show up to the party.

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

“Die with honor, O’Brien.”  -- Tosk

From the very beginning, the Gamma Quadrant was DS9‘s most tantalizing promise.  An entire sector of unexplored space, in which anything could be waiting. In the early going, it was pretty clear that the show wasn’t quite sure how to fulfill that promise.  By the second season, the team of writers led by Ira Steven Behr would surpass it, but, for the time being, it was to be used for the kinds of episodes more suited to TNG.  Just instead of going to the new life and new civilizations, they would have to come through the wormhole to the cast. 

“Who said anything about volunteering? We can haggle over price later.”  --Quark


The mysterious plague episode is the baked potato of the Star Trek franchise.  It’s the staple, presumably what the writers do when they don’t have anything better on the agenda.  “So, what’s the plan this week?”  “I dunno, Ira, how about a mysterious plague?”  “GOLD!  You’re spinning gold right now!”  It might seem shocking that DS9 dipped into that well so quickly, but they showed more restraint than TNG whose “Naked Now” was the very second episode ever.  Fortunately, this doesn’t feature Denise Crosby with bizarre ‘80s hair either.

Two great tastes that go great together! I'm talking of course of Lady Gaga's new video for her latest single, "G.U.Y.," featuring the almost cast of Bravo's The Real Housewives of Beverly HillsAnyone who follows me knows I'm a little obsessed with Gaga and I'm a huge fan of TRHOBHso this had me majorly lactating for sure. Notably absent is Brandi Glanville which makes sense as Gaga is enamored with Madame Lisa VanderPump, and mean girl Brandi was something less than cordial to her former mother figure and BFF this season. So, Lisa? Gaga's your new BFF?  Vanderpump for the win! Also notably (or not so notably) missing is Jacqueline, er, Joyce - thank you, Jesus! (Who also makes an appearance in the video!) It looks like Mother Monster "one-upped" the ultimate one-upper. Paws up! At least we have Kim and Kyle Richards, Lisa, Yolanda, and the next supreme, Carlton. And, what would a Real Housewives brouhaha be without an appearance by Bravo ringleader and real referee Andy Cohen?

“Laws change, depending on who’s making them -- Cardassians one day, Federation the next.  But, justice is justice.”  -- Constable Odo


The quote above is pretty stunning.  It’s not the kind of thing you would see in any other installment in the Star Trek franchise, unless it came out of the mouth of a villain or maybe a guest star whose opinion of Starfleet would change before the credits rolled.  Here, it’s coming from a series regular -- the station’s security officer, Odo -- and he’s basically saying that the laws of our heroic utopia and a brutally oppressive regime, who regarded war crimes as an icebreaker, are the same.  It’s a pretty important window into Odo, who, for the first two episodes, was something of an enigma.  He’s center stage in “A Man Alone,” and we really start seeing the character that would become not only a fan favorite, but arguably the most important person across two quadrants.

I have a confession . . . I play with dolls (or I used to, rather).  When I was a little boy, I fell in love with Barbie and anything pretty with long hair.  My parents would let me have Wonder Woman, Batgirl, and Bionic woman dolls, but Barbie was for sissies and, therefore, not allowed.  Fortunately, my mother gave me a younger sister who shared my obsession with dolls, and I got to play with all of her dolls (including Barbie, snap!) under the guise of sibling bonding.  My childhood passion would turn into a lifelong love affair with the soulless, vapid totems of beauty.  I try to limit my collection to Wonder Woman and anything "special" or rare. (If anyone has an extra limited edition Robert Tonner Zombie Boy doll laying around . . . )

Clifford Meth is a writer, editor, and champion of the rights of comic book creators. As if promoting his new book Comic Book Babylon (a dishy, behind-the-scenes look at the ins and outs of the comic book industry) wasn't enough to keep Cliff busy, he is also trying to resurrect a project created by late, great comic legend Dave Cockrum.

Cliff was kind enough to answer a few questions about Comic Book Babylon and Dave Cockrum's Futurians.

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