Wonder Woman Wednesday

Wonder Woman Wednesday (101)

My fellow Amazons:

Welcome to another whiz bang week of Wonder Woman Wednesday!

The Dark Amazon strikes again!

Welcome to another fun-filled week of Wonder Woman Wednesday. This week's column could qualify as a Dark Knight III: The Master Race review, but since our beloved Wonder Woman plays such a major role, I think we can get away with it. That said, spoilers to follow.

Don't give me reasons, give me alibis . . .

Happy Thanksgiving, fellow Amazons! Thank you for taking time away from your squabbling relatives and turkey comas to join us for another exciting installment of Wonder Woman Wednesday.

The bad news is that the excellent digital-first series, Sensation Conics, starring Wonder Woman has come to an end. The good news is that last week saw the release of the new, digital-first mini series, The Legend of Wonder Woman, by Renae De Liz and Ray Dillon.

The series promises to be a re-imagining of Wonder Woman's origin. Here we go again. It seems as if fans are still reeling from the bastardization of Wonder Woman's origin for the New 52. I, for one, liked Brian Azzarello's take on WW but looked at it as more of an "Elseworlds" tale that just happened to take place in the character's monthly continuity.

If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

It's somewhat hard to imagine that November 7th marked the 40th anniversary of the Wonder Woman television series starring Lynda Carter that first aired in 1975, especially considering Carter is as beautiful today as she was when she first donned the satin tights four decades ago.

Welcome to another week of Wonder Woman Wednesday! This week, I thought I'd try something a little different. This week's column isn't about Wonder Woman. This week is about you, Wonder Woman's Fans!

Greetings, fellow Amazons ! This week, we have a special treat, as iconic cartoonist and legendary Wonder Woman contributor Trina Robbins agreed to answer a few questions for Wonder Woman Wednesday! Trina has been a strong female voice in comics for decades and is in the middle of rolling out her fantastic story for the final arc of Sensation Comics starring Wonder Woman. It was a thrill and an honor to interview a woman whose work I have admired for years.  Enjoy!

Welcome to another Wonder Woman Wednesday, my fellow Amazons! First, I'd like to congratulate myself on the title of this week's column. Pretty clever, eh? So, what the heck does it mean?

Yes, indeed . . . As evidenced by this week's column title, I am officially devoid of shame. But please, allow me to explain. There are certain responsibilities that go along with being a gay man in addition to being a Wonder Woman fan. One of those is a list of "required viewing" films usually of the "Old Hollywood Glamour Queen" or the "Bitchy Teen Dark Comedy" variety.

To the point, at the risk of foregoing my gay card (Yes, they give us a card. Being fabulous has privileges!), I have never seen Breakfast at Tiffany's. Well, I had never seen it until last month. I know. I know. Whatever! What can I tell you? I'm a gentleman whom prefers blondes. I've seen my fair share of Bette Davis flicks, but Marilyn Monroe is my home girl.

"Girls can wear jeans
And cut their hair short,
Wear shirts and boots
'Cause it's OK to be a boy.
But for a boy to look like a girl is degrading
'Cause you think that being a girl is degrading
But, secretly, you'd love to know what it's like,
Wouldn't you
What it feels like for a girl"


Madonna used this quote from the film, The Cement Garden, to introduce her 2001 hit single, "What It Feels Like for a Girl," from her highly successful Music album. As we will be taking about gender equality and representation, it seemed an apropos way to introduce this week's #WonderBOYWednesday column. Yes, my dears, you read that correctly - just for the fun of it, this week, it's #WonderBOYWednesday. (We'll return to our regularly scheduled, gender-specific title next #WonderWomanWednesday!)

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