At WonderCon 2014, no one in the 'verse could stop the fans' love for all things Joss Whedon.  On the sunny afternoon of the convention's final day, a line of enthusiastic attendees wielding everything from Jayne hats and scythes to black trenchcoats, parasols, and stakes lined the upper floor of the Anaheim Convention Center, extending down the hall, outside the doors, and onto the outside patio, all while awaiting Dark Horse Comics' Whedonversity Panel.  The excitement for not only the impending panel but for their love of the Whedonverse was palpable, and you couldn't help but smile when a duo of fans began playing and singing the theme song to Firefly and a raucous rendition of "The Hero of Canton" (also from Firefly), until the entire line was joined in song and merriment.  (You know that you're in for a great time when, even before a convention panel begins, the entire line of attendees trades the normal practice of pushing their way into the panel room for joyfully walking into the room with a hearty song.)

Greetings, tributes and victors!

Fanboy Comics had the good fortune to be invited (Special thanks to Marsia Powers of Whedonopolis and Mark Sheppard for “greasing the wheels” with President Snow to get us inside!) to a special preview and reception for the official auction of the actual costumes from The Hunger Games film adaptation.

At San Diego Comic-Con 2013, the FBC Crew attended Stripped: The Comics Documentary panel, which featured the creators of the comic strip documentary which has been four years in the making.  Stripped, a Kickstarter success story, is a documentary that brings together the world's best cartoonists to talk about the art form they love, and what happens to it as newsprint fades away.  The film includes interviews with Jim Davis (Garfield), Cathy Guisewite (Cathy), Jean Schulz (Peanuts), Mike and Jerry (Penny Arcade), Matt Inman (The Oatmeal), and 90 more of the world's best cartoonists.  Exciting to add is that the film includes the first-ever recorded interview with Bill Watterson (Calvin and Hobbes).

When Eric Stephenson took the stage at the Image Comics Expo keynote, we had no idea just how many creators and new titles we'd be treated to that day. Between the keynote presentation and the subsequent interviews with each of these creators, there was a lot of information thrown out there, but let's focus on the exciting, new properties at Image.

*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.


Yesterday was Image Expo, an all-day media event to show off what's next from Image Comics. Fanboy Comics sent Kristine Chester and I to cover the event in San Francisco. Kristine will be delivering an article with all the news from the show, so I thought I would deliver more of an opinion piece on the Image Expo experience.

 

Tekkoshocon X2Is it just me or are Otaku constantly getting younger? When it comes to an online presence, the young'uns are always gonna have a step up on everyone else, because besides school, homework, and maybe an after-school job, they have an insane amount of free time. I remember those carefree days, hitting up the video store (yes video a.k.a. VHS. Wiki that if you have no idea what I'm jabbering about.), wandering over to a friend's house, popping in the latest hard-to-find anime and sitting back chillaxin' when those kanji credits rolled. Afterwards, we'd talk about it while playing some street hockey and then getting on an AOL chatroom to further that discussion with dorks from other states. If you have to ask what a chatroom is, then Wiki that, too. The point is hardcore Otaku talk used to be few and far between for many. That is, until we could convince Mom to let us go to a con. We wouldn't know anyone other than who we came with, but soon made friends over common interests like what we were watching, how we figured out how to make a cosplay outfit from stuff we found at a thrift shop, and what bands from overseas we got a bootleg of at the last anime club meeting. Thank goodness for cons.

 

Remember MeBy the year 2084, social media has evolved to the point that everyone is equipped with a memory-capturing implant called a SenseEm. People record what they see, hear, smell, feel, and taste and share their experiences with others. This is the core concept by which the setting of the first game from Dontnod Entertainment, Remember Me, is built. Nilin is a memory hunter, one of a select few who can alter the memories of targets with the right reasons, but when she wakes up with no memories of her own, she will have to piece together her past while going up against Memorize, manufacturer of SenseEm, and the most powerful company on the planet.

 

Chew 29If by “despair” they meant “laugh your a-- off,” then the title of this panel is completely accurate. John Layman is perhaps best known for his work on the Image series Chew, but he's also done a lot of other work ranging from lettering and editing to writing other books like Detective Comics and Mars Attacks.

During this Q&A session, Layman told the story of his publishing life: how he first became involved with Wildstorm, editing books like The Authority and Danger Girl, and after a rough ending to that relationship, began freelancing in the world of video games writing Metroid Prime, the “s--t talking dialogue” for the World Series of Poker, American Choppers, and many more. However, Layman's heart has always belonged to comics and to the idea of a cannibal cop in a world forever changed by bird flu. Chew was shopped around for a while, being rejected by Vertigo, IDW, and other publishers before finally landing at Image, where it became an instant success.

 

bells-of-st-johns-doctor-who-poster-247x350The whirl of sonic screwdrivers filled the air as over 1,500 people eagerly waited in line to see an early look at the premiere episode of Doctor Who's second half of Series Seven, “The Bells of St. John,” on Friday night at WonderCon. The excitement of Whovians should be harnessed as an energy source it was so palpable and prevalent throughout all those gathered. Everyone from cosplayers dressing as a wide assortment of Doctors and companions from the series' 50-year history to little kids who got their start during the Matt Smith era and are excited to see their Doctor return were present en mass.

But, as the line filed forward, it became clear that the theater wasn't going to have room for all those who had gathered. Concern started to spread when the call came from someone at BBC America to show not one, but two more screenings of Doctor Who and Orphan Black to ensure everyone who wanted to could see the episodes. BBC America, you're all right in this reviewer's book. You've never seen a more grateful crowd as we filed into the second screening and some familiar music started playing.

Music that Makes You ScreamDear Fanboy Comics Readers:


The FBC Crew attended BMI (@BMI) and White Bear PR's WonderCon panel entitled 'The Music That Makes You Scream,' which featured film and television's talented composers as they discussed the art of composing for the horror genre.  From the frightening two notes that signal the arrival of the great white in Jaws to the shrieking minor chord that will forever be tied to the shower scene in Psycho, music adds an extra special "creep factor" to our favorite frightening films.  Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI), the leading global music rights organization, and White Bear PR hosted the horror-themed panel in an effort to educate audiences about the role of music in TV and film.

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