Now that the first definitive Wonder Woman movie has hit the multiplexes of America, it is interesting (and instructive) to look back at the troubled history of bringing this iconic character to the big screen. Created in 1941 by controversial psychologist William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman gathered a huge following over the following decades, but translating her to television and movies proved a long and tortuous project. Her most popular reincarnation was Lynda Carter's version in the Wonder Woman TV series which ran three seasons from 1975 to 1979. But following that promising opening, Wonder Woman once again lapsed into Hollywood development hell.

Let's talk about impact - like the impact of a speeding bullet being deflected by one of Wonder Woman's magic bracelets. Arguably, no one has had a bigger impact on the legend of Wonder Woman than Lynda Carter.

The staff of Fanbase Press would like to wish you a very happy Geek Pride Day! As the website that celebrates fandom in all of its diverse forms, we would be remiss if we did not inform our readers about one of the most important days of the year.

“I kept telling myself if I could just hold out until May, just May 8th, I would turn twelve and be able to sign up for the tessarae and get that precious oil and grain to feed us.” -Katniss Everdeen, The Hunger Games (pg. 27-28)

Comic book publisher BOOM! Studios will soon be releasing Over the Garden Wall #13 on Wednesday, May 10, written by George Mager, illustrated by Kiernan Sjursen-Lien, and with cover art by Sjursen-Lien and Jeremy Sorese. The publisher has been very generous to the Fanbase Press staff, as we are now able to share an exclusive advance preview of Issue #13!

A fandom has reached the pinnacle of popular culture greatness when a day is celebrated in its honor; however, it is an unprecedented phenomenon when a franchise has two days each year to celebrate its geekiness. While some enduring franchises of multiple decades do not have any globally recognized commemorative days, Star Wars is the singular franchise that has back-to-back celebratory days: May the Fourth and Revenge of the Fifth.

In the UK, we had to wait for months.

Dark and domineering, Darth Vader is one of the most iconic villains of all time. He commands the screen—whether by just a glimpse of his helmet, a brief breath of air, or the glow of a red lightsaber. Below are 10 reasons why Vader was, is, and always will be a perfect villain.

I’m dating myself here, but I am old enough to have seen Star Wars during its original theatrical run in 1977.  It’s interesting to think about how the movie-going experience has changed over 40 years.  I grew up in a small town in the Midwest.  Kansas City was my nearest major metropolitan area.  It took a while before I got a chance to see Star Wars for a couple of reasons. First, I was in elementary school and unable to drive myself. The second was that, for quite a long time, Star Wars screened exclusively on one screen in Kansas City, and Kansas City wasn’t alone as it relates to that release pattern.  Star Wars played at the Glenwood Cinema for over one full year (55 weeks to be exact).  With it only playing on one screen in a city of nearly two million people, getting into it was kind of like getting tickets to Hamilton.  Contemporary release patterns are considerably more wide and extensive.  Films move in and out of the multiplex quickly, because the studios need to maximize that opening weekend as much as they can.  If a film doesn’t open well, it doesn’t have time to find an audience, because there are more movies coming after it that will eat up the screens.  For instance, The Force Awakens opened on over 4100 screens across North American.  To put in perspective the change from 1977, when Star Wars ran in first run cinemas for over 12 months, a year after The Force Awakens was released, Rogue One was already in theaters and The Last Jedi was already in principle photography.

Mass Effect: Andromeda has sought to recapture the novelty and possibility of the original Mass Effect by taking the franchise to a totally new galaxy. The design elements, the characters, the player input, and the visual cuing all try to build the sense of discovery.

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