The trading cards were what did it.  Almost everything else made sense, but why the cards?  Why market stuff for an R-rated movie to kids who are not actually allowed to see it?

“Fundamental Comics,” a monthly editorial series that introduces readers to comics, graphic novels, and manga that have been impactful to the sequential art medium and the comic book industry on a foundational level.  Each month, a new essay will examine a familiar or lesser-known title through an in-depth analysis, exploring the history of the title, significant themes, and context for the title’s popularity since it was first released.

A few months back, my son started watching Sesame Street, and I was excited for him to learn from all of the great Muppet characters. But I wasn’t expecting to gain a new appreciation for the show. Unbeknownst to me, Sesame Street has a history of tapping into popular culture. From Monsterpiece Theater to Crumby Pictures, Sesame Street has created many great parodies of TV shows, films, and plays. The parodies are deliciously fun for adults and often educational for children. In 2014, San Diego Comic-Con even hosted a panel with the show’s performers and executive producer discussing 45 years of spoofs. So, I decided to find the best examples of spoofs that pay homage to geek culture. Below are 13 geeky and awesome examples.

It was 50 years ago today that audiences were transported back in time a million years to a watering hole on the African desert, where two rival hominids clashed with deadly results in the shadow of a black monolith. Directed by Stanley Kubrick, 2001: A Space Odyssey has become one of the most revered films in the history of cinema and has influenced many of our contemporary science fiction directors today. Fanbase Press honors the 50th anniversary and celebrates the fandoms surrounding this film.  

“Fundamental Comics,” a monthly editorial series that introduces readers to comics, graphic novels, and manga that have been impactful to the sequential art medium and the comic book industry on a foundational level.  Each month, a new essay will examine a familiar or lesser-known title through an in-depth analysis, exploring the history of the title, significant themes, and context for the title’s popularity since it was first released.

The Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, often referred to simply as “the Eisners,” are generally accepted as the most prestigious recognition one can receive in the comic book field. Named in honor of comic book pioneer Will Eisner, the creator of The Spirit and the man who helped to popularize the term "graphic novel," the Eisner Awards span over two dozen categories, including everything from Best Artist and Best Writer to Best Comics-Related Periodical/Journalism. The awards are presented annually at the San Diego Comic-Con International convention during a ceremony that is open to not only comic book professionals, but all convention attendees.

Pussycats publisher E-Comix’s will soon be releasing their latest mini-series, The End of Everything; however, due to a printing snafu, readers will soon be treated to a chase variant of the comic with exclusive, hand-numbered artwork.

Tangent. Secant. Cosine. Sine. 3.14159. Go, Pi Day!

Batman: The Long Halloween
Writer: Jeph Loeb
Artist: Tim Sale
Letterer: Comicraft, Richard Starkings
Editor: Archie Goodwin, Chuck Kim
Publisher: DC Comics
Publication Date: 1996-1997
No. of Issues: 13

Comic book publisher Oni Press will soon release the first collected volume of Kim Reaper, a series written and illustrated by Sarah Graley, on Wednesday, February 14, 2018. The publisher has been very generous to the Fanbase Press staff, as we are now able to share an advance preview!

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