Facebook logo*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.



On a Facebook Wall: "How do you think he would like it if I sat him between X and Y at our event? Ha!" 3 months later: "Hey guys, I can only private message and not post on my Wall because I've been banned from Facebook for the next 12 hours." It appears that if enough people disagree with your comments or opinion, all they need is enough people they can convince to report you, and the power trip can begin.

 

SW Tyrants Fist 1*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.


I grew up with Star Wars comics, they being one of the very few titles I have read since I first got into comic book reading, and the titles (for me at least) have done a great job of bridging the gaps between the feature films and the novels.  For me, Star Wars has always been a central core of my geekdom, a pillar upon which I have judged other aspects of science fiction—as well as other aspects of Star Wars itself—and I have immensely enjoyed the stories that Dark Horse has provided . . . well, most of them. There will always be some that I am not a fan of, but that’s the way things go.  But now, with Disney’s acquisition of LucasFilm, the license to produce Star Wars comic material has been lost to Marvel (another division of Disney), and once the current contracts of ongoing (and soon-to-be-made) comics finish, Dark Horse will lose one of the most important resources it has relied upon since 1991: the overwhelming obsession of Star Wars fans.

Amazing Spider-Man 700*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.

 

Anyone who really knows me will not find it strange that I consider Spider-Man to be my favorite and strongest superhero, especially given his geekish and nerdy background—something I know quite a bit about. Over the last few years, I have been trying to catch up with the comics that tell the tales of the famous wall-crawling, web-slinging solo savior and have seen a lot of interesting and life-changing things in his life.  While I haven’t read the majority of the Amazing Spider-Man title (or several other of the long-running comics, aside from the Ultimate version), I have looked into the history of the man behind the mask, and a lot of it was well written . . . until we get to the most recent end of ASM #700.  One would think that I would be used to endings like this given the way the heroes of the Marvel and DC worlds blink in and out of existence, but the way this was done really has me wondering if I even want to continue reading the new adventures of Spider-Man when in the series that started not long ago.

SPOILERS BELOW

 

 

Shadow*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.



As someone who grew up in the Modern Age of print comics, I missed out on some of the more “classic” tales pertaining to several of my superhero icons—the Clone Saga of Spider-Man, the Death of Robin in the Batman titles, the introduction of Darkseid and Apocalypse as major “Big-Bads” in their respective universes—and thus my idea of storytelling was vastly different than of those who came before me.  The Golden and Silver Ages of comics seemed to have been held in very high regard by several people, but after having read (and attempted to read) a variety of titles from those bygone eras, I find myself seeing a pattern when it comes to the nature of how comics are told to their audiences.  While I’m always going to be thankful for the influence that the previous eras have given to the characters that I read today, I have found it difficult to read anything before 2000 (with some notable exceptions).  I know that at least one of my friends agrees with me on this concept, and that the way comics have been done has changed drastically since the 1930s.

MINOR HISTORICAL SPOILERS BELOW

 

Kid Reading Comics*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.

 

Dear Marvel and DC,

I’m a huge fan. I read a lot of your books and a lot of books from other “indie” publishers. In general, I’m just a big fan of comic books altogether. I’m 26 and my particular fandom started when I was 7 years old. My Saturday mornings and every day after school were dominated by Batman: The Animated Series and the X-Men cartoon; however, the fun didn’t stop there for me. My parents knew I was a big fan and started to buy me comics at the grocery store, the newsstand, and eventually at a local comic book store. I spent my formative teen and college years with a wonderful assortment of different characters and stories to enjoy. I even had my dark phase in my early 20s where I read a lot of Alan Moore and Frank Miller, but it always came back to superhero books for me.

 

 

FanFiction logo*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.


Throughout the internet, there is a vast array of writings that are made by those who are dedicated to their subject matter, people who enjoy both creating an extension of established continuity for several franchises, as well as creating completely unthought of combinations for the pure sake of just having it done.  People of all ages, backgrounds, and writing skills work for long periods of time—sometimes as long as an hour—to create enjoyment for others.  These people are many, diverse, and relatively unknown in the grand scheme of things.  They are the ones who write fanfiction.

SPOILERS BELOW

 

Comics random charactersWhile I am relatively new to major mainstream comics, I have still spend a good many years reading various titles due to fanboy giddiness; however, there has always been another aspect of comics that I’ve read in a much more comprehensive, perhaps even obsessive, capacity over the years.  Print comics are nice, and very colorful, but the main problem was that I could never get enough of them to entertain me on a regular basis, and as one knows, when one is bored, they end up surfing the Internet with reckless abandon.  During such an endeavor, I came upon one (of many) entertaining medium that has since stuck with me: web comics.

 

 

Marvel*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.

Both Marvel and DC have their main shared universe in which the majority of their characters reside, but they also have separate worlds in which other versions of their characters exist.  The most widely talked about alternative world is that of the Marvel Ultimate universe, in which characters have been introduced in a drastically different manner from their original incarnations.  But, what is it that really appeals about the Ultimate universe that makes people (such as myself and my co-conspirator, Kristine Chester) read it moreso than the main universe?  Well, it’s because there is a dramatic difference between the Ultimate line and the "normal" line; the Ultimate line doesn’t have decades upon decades of comics that have forced the direction of its storytelling.


MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

 

 

Star Wars vs. Star Trek*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.

Throughout my life and time in geekdom, I’ve come upon several people who have wanted to divide geeks into two camps: those who enjoy Star Wars, and those who enjoy Star Trek.  And, even within those divisions, more divisions have occurred: which Trek series is the best, which Star Wars trilogy is better, which books are more enjoyable to read, etc.  It is as though people feel the need to belong to a certain subgroup in order to find acceptance—heck, even the term geek has come to mean a clique in the past few years.  Well, as someone who is both a Star Trek AND a Star Wars fan, I’m going to tell you just which one is better: they’re both awesome, and they both suck.

MINOR HISTORICAL SPOILERS BELOW

 

Drew Carls JrUPDATED AS OF SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

 
 
The Fanboy Comics staff is happy to report that Drew Siragusa, after his unfortunate Spider-Man incident (as described below), successfully received his free burger from Carl's Jr.®, which was happily documented in the Facebook gallery here.  Thank you to Carl's Jr.® for their kindness and generosity to Drew.



UPDATED AS OF JULY 25, 2012

 
 
On July 23, 2012, shortly after this article went live, Carl's Jr. contacted Fanboy Comics and provided an email contact who will work with FBC staff member Drew Siragusa to acquire the burger he is owed. FBC thanks Carl's Jr. for their efforts to correct this issue and also thanks Spider-Man for once again fighting crime, whether wearing red or black.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Dear Carl's Jr.,


When I first heard about your recent “Dress as Spider-Man and receive a free Grilled Cheese Bacon Burger” promotion, I was very excited. As a life-long fan of Spider-Man and an ingester of cheeseburgers, I felt like this promotion was made for me; however, I was extremely disappointed as my visit to Carl's Jr. took a turn for the worse.

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