In this day and age, one must feel lost without the presence of social media. Or maybe they feel relieved? Lord knows, I'll never know the difference. Not a day goes by now where I haven't tweeted, posted, or hashtagged to let others know what happened throughout my day. And, unfortunately, I'm sure I'm not alone...

What do Barbara from Night of The Living Dead and the recent “Brexit” vote have in common?

Quite a bit, I’d say.

I am on the record in my support of the all-female Ghostbusters movie we’re getting next month.  Some of the reactions to it from fandom communities have been so annoying and offensive that I’ve never in my life wanted a film to be great just to silence its detractors.  Multiple blogger have taken to the internet in recent days to write essays in which they are swearing off seeing Ghostbusters, as if not seeing a movie is some kind of impressive gesture of defiance, because their beloved franchise is now being fronted by women.  They feel a righteous indignation that the Ghostbusters movie is being ruined, and they’re very vocal about boycotting it.

And now, it’s my turn.

We live in a world inundated with books and movies focusing on dystopias: The Hunger Games, Divergent, The Fifth Wave, The Maze Runner, etc. It’s easy to believe that the economic crises and international political upheavals starting in the late 1990s created a market for stories about corrupt governments and damaged societies, but the genre has much deeper roots. Logan’s Run, based on the 1967 novel of the same name, debuted in theaters on June 23, 1976, and given there’s hardly a dystopian novel or film without my name written all over it, I’m shocked I hadn’t seen it until now.

“Darwyn always made me feel like when he was talking to me, he was 100% focused on me.
It's because he was...he was like this with everyone. It was his superpower.
To live in that moment and give it his all.
His art was a physical version of this. It's why his art reached so many people.
He was speaking directly to you and giving you every bit of himself. I'm going to miss you, man.”
- Shannon Eric Denton (Writer/Artist, Spectrum, Fleshdigger)

Early cinema fair often turned to literature for inspiration and source material. The space horror genre is no different; its roots can be traced back to early 20th century science fiction writers such as H.G. Wells (The War of the Worlds, 1898) and Robert Potter (The Germ Growers, 1892), featuring alien invasion storylines. As films grew in popularity, filmmakers were looking past the reality shorts that defined the medium, realizing that this new format could be used to tell stories that entertained.

After Sundance 2014, I was ready to discuss my favorite films I had the pleasure of seeing and share my overall views on the festival, like usual. As my time in Park City, Utah, drew to a close, I’d begun compiling a list of movies I wanted to recommend to our FBC community.  It all seemed pretty straightforward.

Shortly thereafter, actor Philip Seymour Hoffman passed away. My overall experience of the festival and the films I saw there, in particular the two he starred in (A Most Wanted Man and God’s Pocket), films that I watched alongside him in the theater, has now changed considerably.

*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.


Steven Spielberg. Martin Scorsese. Francis Ford Coppola. George Lucas. These master storytellers are some of my biggest influences for two reasons. The first is their incredible repertoires of work. The second is the freedom they had to tell their stories. These are the guys that taught me how to be a filmmaker, and that if you wanted to be one, you needed to grow a beard. (See Exhibits A-D) They pioneered one of the greatest eras of cinematic history, The Storyteller Era. The period in the annals of filmmaking history, where the director had true control over his/her story. Some of the greatest movies ever made were made in this time. Raiders of the Lost Ark, Star Wars, Taxi Driver, The Godfather, Jaws, Raging Bull, Apocalypse Now. I could go on. And on. And on.

 

Drew Carls JrUPDATED AS OF SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

 
 
The Fanboy Comics staff is happy to report that Drew Siragusa, after his unfortunate Spider-Man incident (as described below), successfully received his free burger from Carl's Jr.®, which was happily documented in the Facebook gallery here.  Thank you to Carl's Jr.® for their kindness and generosity to Drew.



UPDATED AS OF JULY 25, 2012

 
 
On July 23, 2012, shortly after this article went live, Carl's Jr. contacted Fanboy Comics and provided an email contact who will work with FBC staff member Drew Siragusa to acquire the burger he is owed. FBC thanks Carl's Jr. for their efforts to correct this issue and also thanks Spider-Man for once again fighting crime, whether wearing red or black.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Dear Carl's Jr.,


When I first heard about your recent “Dress as Spider-Man and receive a free Grilled Cheese Bacon Burger” promotion, I was very excited. As a life-long fan of Spider-Man and an ingester of cheeseburgers, I felt like this promotion was made for me; however, I was extremely disappointed as my visit to Carl's Jr. took a turn for the worse.

 

Superman Blue 1It’s said that we look back on the past with rose-colored glasses; I’m not entirely sure what that is supposed to mean, but those would have turned the subject of this article purple, so that’s fun.  I’m always quick to tell people that I was actually a fan of the time Superman turned into a bright blue energy dude, but that was fifteen years ago. Lately, it’s been coming up a lot, so I thought I would put my money where my mouth is by sitting down with 11-year-old me and re-reading all of my comics featuring “Superman Blue.” Also, the red one. How did it hold up? What new discoveries were made? How is this even possible? Read on.

(For those of you who are fussy about details, the issues I read are: The Adventures of Superman #545-6, 555; Action Comics #732,742; Superman: Man of Steel #67, 77; Superman #123, 132; Superman Red/Superman Blue #1; and JLA: Secret Files and Origins #1)

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