A little film premiered on October 1, 1968, which told the story of seven people who barricaded themselves in a rural farmhouse in western Pennsylvania one night. Night of the Living Dead was George A. Romero’s first feature-length film after having shot short films, TV commercials, and even a segment for Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. Romero directed, photographed, edited, and co-wrote the film on a budget of $114,000. It became a cult classic, spawning a number of sequels and remakes; however, it also revolutionized the horror genre, as well as redefined the concept of the zombie. Now fifty years strong, Fanbase Press commemorates the 50th anniversary of Night of the Living Dead with this special editorial essay from horror writer/scholar Dr. Kevin Wetmore. – Ed.

O golden-tongued action film with serene lute!
   Fair plumed T’challa! King of far away! (Wakanda Forever!)
   Leave melodizing on this summer day,
Shut up thine director’s commentary, and be mute:
Adieu! for once again the fierce dispute,
   Betwixt damnation and impassion'd clay
   Must I burn through; once more humbly assay
The bitter-sweet of this Whedonesque fruit.
Thanos! and ye Guardians of the Galaxy,
   Begetters of our deep eternal theme,
When through the Marvel Cinematic Universe I am gone,
   Let me not wander in a barren dream,
But when I am consumed in the fire,
Give me new some infinity stones and an Iron Man suit
    to fly at my desire.

“Fundamental Comics,” a monthly editorial series that introduces readers to comics, graphic novels, and manga that have been impactful to the sequential art medium and the comic book industry on a foundational level. Each month, a new essay will examine a familiar or less-known title through an in-depth analysis, exploring the history of the title, significant themes, and context for the title’s popularity since it was first released.

The 10th anniversary for the Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008) animated film is here, and it’s quite easy to wrap up my experience of watching it recently for the first time.

Comic book publisher Oni Press will soon release an all-new color edition of the beloved all-ages fantasy/humor book, Banana Sunday, to be released on October 24. Writer Paul Tobin and artist Colleen Coover have teamed up with colorist Rian Sygh to bring this collection to vibrant life with a brand-new introduction by Tobin and previously uncollected art from Coover! The publisher has been very generous to the Fanbase Press staff, as we are now able to share an advance preview!

Here at Fanbase Press, we have eagerly followed the success of Action Lab's hard-boiled crime drama series, Spencer & Locke, since its announcement in October 2016.  Written by David Pepose and illustrated by Jorge Santiago, Jr.  Spencer & Locke follows Detective Locke, who returns to the scene of his horrific upbringing when his grade-school sweetheart, Sophie Jenkins, is found dead in a lonesome back alley. But when Locke’s investigation dredges up menacing figures from his traumatic past, there’s only one person he can trust to help him close the case — his childhood imaginary panther, Spencer.  The series tackles noir, drama, and mental health issues with a deft and thoughtful hand, as is outlined in Fanbase Press' recent installment in the Fundamental Comics series.  Today, Action Lab has announced the continuation of the series with Spencer & Locke 2 with an SDCC 2018 exclusive issue planned for next week.  The full press release from Action Lab's announcement is listed below, and we, at Fanbase Press, eagerly anticipate the new issues!

“Sweet Christmas.” A simple phrase, and yet, it goes a long way to define a lovable character like Luke Cage. Season Two of Marvel’s Luke Cage released on Netflix on Friday, June 22, and it does not let go of its Season One grip on tough characters.

These violent delights have confusing, excessively glutted, unnecessarily complicated ends.  

“Fundament Comics,” a monthly editorial series that introduces readers to comics, graphic novels, and manga that have been impactful to the sequential art medium and the comic book industry on a foundational level.  Each month, a new essay will examine a familiar or lesser-known title through an in-depth analysis, exploring the history of the title, significant themes, and context for the title’s popularity since it was first released.

Last week saw the release of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, the second film in the Jurassic Park sequel trilogy being overseen by director/producer Colin Trevorrow. The Jurassic World films have impressed many and disappointed others, but what some Jurassic fans might not be aware of is that the very first “sequels” to Spielberg’s modern classic were actually in the form of several comic book series published by the now-defunct Topps Comics between 1993-1997. Featuring acclaimed and iconic comic talent from the likes of Steve Englehart, Michael Golden, Adam Hughes, John Byrne, George Pérez, and more, these comic books took the story in many unexpected directions. These stories from the world of Jurassic Park are an untapped resource for adaptation to other mediums, and below are the top five lessons the new films could learn from these forgotten ancestors of the franchise.

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