Drew Siragusa, Fanbase Press Senior Contributor

Drew Siragusa, Fanbase Press Senior Contributor
Favorite Movie: Metropolis
Favorite Comic Book: The Ultimates
Favorite Video Game: The Legend of Zelda

Reign of the Supermen is my favorite Superman story.  The comic book crossover event was used to revitalize the character (both literally and figuratively).  Decades later, some of those once-new elements have aged better than others.  The really fun part of the animated adaptation is that it again updates things to make it contemporary. At the same time, it knows when to embrace the '90s cheese.

Like a lot of episodes this past season, I enjoyed the subplot of “Resolution” better than the main story.  I am much more invested in the companions’ arc than the adventure aspects.  Showrunner Chris Chibnall’s decision to shift the focus of the show back on the companions was the right move (especially since the previous era focused so much on mystery and suspense); however, I needed more from the Thirteenth Doctor’s first confrontation with the Daleks—or any classic monster for that matter.

I would like to begin my review of “The Battle of Ranskoor Av Kolos” by pointing out how I correctly predicted that the Stenza would be the big bad for Series 11 in my review of the second episode.  (Ed. Note: Our staff at Fanbase Press are the most humble of folks.)

“It Takes You Away” started off slow but then won me over in the second half.

I had a very strange experience watching Doctor Who this week.  “The Witchfinders” sees the Doctor and her companions travel to Pendle Hill.  My association with Pendle Hill is that it is the name of the school handbook at my alma mater.  The school was founded by Quakers, and the book is named after the site where George Fox had a vision to establish the denomination.  Needless to say, we were never told about the incident that made the location infamous.

Good sci-fi can take real-world issues and put them in a different context to shine a new light on them.  With society becoming increasingly automated, the latest Doctor Who episode, “Kerblam!,” focuses on how that would affect the workplace.

Like the Doctor Who episode, “Rosa,” a few weeks ago, “Demons of the Punjab” focuses almost exclusively on historical events and keeps the sci-fi elements to a minimum.  Set during the Partition of India, the Doctor takes her companions back to 1947, so Yaz can see her grandmother’s past.

Earlier this season, we saw an episode that was an homage to Predator, while “The Tsuranga Conundrum” was clearly modeled after Alien … if the Xenomorph was a space gremlin.  Strangely enough, this bizarre combination works.

Chris Chibnall’s tenure as showrunner has clearly shifted the focus of Doctor Who to have a closer resemblance to its classic adventures, and “Arachnids in the UK” is his love letter to the Third Doctor.

When I first heard that Doctor Who would be visiting Rosa Parks in Montgomery, Alabama, during 1955, I was a bit nervous.  The show has a tendency to go wild with the sci-fi elements when meeting historical figures (such as HG Wells meeting lizards known as Morlox or Shakespeare fighting alien witches).  At times, this can be fun; although, it could easily disrespect her contribution to the Civil Rights Movement.

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