Jodi Scaife, Fanbase Press Social Media Strategist

Jodi Scaife, Fanbase Press Social Media Strategist

Mid-30s geek type with a houseful of pets, books, DVDs, CDs, and manga

Transformers: Windblade #6 steps away from the lighthearted tone of the Velocitron arc and heads back to serious political wheeling and dealing. The race to gain delegates for the Council of Worlds heats up drastically, and young Windblade must learn that pure morals and intentions often are counterpoint to winning at the power games she’s become embroiled in on Cybertron.

The opening pages of Sevara #2 proved to me that while the story follows a roughly chronological pattern, it is definitely not linear!  Alathea somehow survived the events at the end of the last issue, but she has acquired a young infant while she runs from the King’s soldiers and others wanting to track her down.  Before, she was just marked as an unmarried woman and an escaped slave; now, she is considered a foreign witch, as well.  If she can survive long enough, Alathea may unlock the potential Sevara saw in her, but she has to manage to stay alive and not make too many missteps with her precious burden along the way.

The pope is so eager to get his Clone Jesus-based healing on that he’s sent an extraction team to Malsum Island to seize the Son of God (or at least his genetic incarnation). Each member of the group is a hardened warrior except for the gentle doctor, Mary (Any possible symbolism here?), and they expect a simple mission into the research labs to nab a gentle, peace-loving miracle worker. The misfits and genetic horrors of ReGen Corp don’t intend to stand by quietly and let their Jesus be kidnapped, though, and their special abilities are far beyond anything humanity could logically imagine!

Transformers: Windblade #5 takes a high-stakes bid for political alliance and makes it fun! The “lost” colony of Velocitron revolves around racing and speed, so Windblade’s last chance to forge ties involves a retired Cybertronian racer and a no-holds barred charity race featuring a boon from Velocitron’s leader, Override.

Issue #3 of The Hawk of New York picks up five years after the life-changing events in Issue #2.  Eric has developed a life as a hardcore martial arts instructor whose harsh teaching only hides the desire to help protect his students from being taken advantage of by life. His need to avenge Mr. Olive and Tara still drives him, though, and he hasn’t forgotten the evil created by The Devil Marauders Motorcycle Club.  Will he finally find his path to become The Hawk and protect the innocent and those he holds most dear?

After reviewing Sevara #0 last year, I never expected that the first full installment of the series would take place in a society that is a throwback to ancient and medieval culture with a few darker twists.  The people follow the dictates of Mitan, who is hailed as a god, and humans are divided into kings and prones/slaves.  When a young woman dares to run away from the palace, the king retaliates by cutting off the villagers’ water supply, condemning them to death by dehydration if the runaway is not found within three days.  The royal hunters track the girl down, but a mysterious woman prevents her death and recapture.  This protector possesses abilities greater than most humans, but why is she here and how will her presence affect the fate of the rebellious slave girl?

Falcio and his companions changed irreparably due to the events they faced in their debut story, Traitor’s Blade, but they still follow the teachings of the deceased King Paelis and endeavor to fulfill his final quests.  Now that the men have successfully decoded the meaning of the King’s Charoites and discovered one of the hidden heirs to Tristia’s throne, life should be easier right? Not when you live in a land where treachery and betrayal are like breathing to most of the nobility, and not even your allies can be completely trusted!

The universe really seemed determined to keep me from reading and reviewing Rachel E. Kelly’s third installment in her Colorworld series, Lumaworld.  I struggled with the storyline anyway, because the focus on terminal illness felt too personal, and then my Kindle suddenly died.  When my replacement arrived, none of my progress had been saved, so I faced re-reading material that I’d found difficult on the first pass; however, I’m glad that I did, because the true theme of Lumaworld is hope: hope in miracles; hope in the unknown; hope that things will somehow get better even if you don’t understand how.  It’s not an easy read, at times, but the message rings true and is incredibly important to all of us.

After the seriousness of the Combiner Wars mini-series, Windblade’s final installment to the tale adds some much-needed humor to the mix. Sure, the crew on Cybertron is facing some serious problems, but the key to their resolution makes me smile, plus it opens up the door to some amazing action in the coming issues!

After Outré’s foray into a wordless issue for Issue #4 of the indie anthology, dipping into the theme of desire for Issue #5 almost seems like low hanging fruit. Desire sounds so obvious and easy, but the contributors to Outré always manage to surprise me, and none of the four stories are as straightforward as the topic would lead readers to believe.

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