Jodi Scaife, Fanbase Press Social Media Strategist

Jodi Scaife, Fanbase Press Social Media Strategist

Mid-30s geek type with a houseful of pets, books, DVDs, CDs, and manga

The only problem with #0 issues of comics is that if it’s a really good introduction, readers are left desperately wanting more. The Yuan Twins' latest work, Inspector Oh #0, definitely falls into that category. It follows the adventures of the titular Inspector Oh (an exorcist) and his scrappy, capable, and quite probably more practical “niece” (If I read this issue correctly, Oh and Ziyi are not actually blood relations; Oh is a close friend of Ziyi’s parents, so he’s like family.) as they travel around China battling various supernatural threats.

‘Keys to the Sun:’ Book Review

Every youngster wants the chance to be chosen for an incredible quest to save the world, but what if you sort of stumble into it thanks to a wacky family friend, a mysterious house, and a vacation in one of the US’s most haunted cities? Lucas and Parker Chance’s family vacation to see their ‘Aunt’ Ruby in New Orleans introduces them to Nicole “Cole” Wells and a quest to help preserve the balance between good and evil.  There are clues to find, puzzles to decode, nefarious villains to evade, and, of course, more than a few beignets to enjoy in this fun YA romp that doubles as a love letter to a sultry city of the Deep South!

After the barn fire Jesse Sullivan deliberately set to kill her abusive step-father Eddie, it was revealed that she was infected with the NRD virus and the angry young woman had two choices: become a licensed death replacement agent or go to prison for murder. It wasn’t much of a choice; however, when agents start showing up permanently dead and Jesse is attacked on an assignment, things get, well, complicated.  When work was the only thing she could count on to run like it should, Jesse isn’t thrilled by the twist, especially when certain…visions make her fear she’s losing her marbles like her mentor, Rachel.  Staying alive and finding some answers is just the tip of the iceberg, and this is one necronite who isn’t going down without putting up a serious fight.

After losing his students and mentor to the Devil Marauders in The Hawk of New York #3, Eric descends into a darkness that can only be appeased by vengeance on those responsible for his pain. Doc, the homeless man who saved him from death, tries to show him the error of his choices by appealing to Eric’s Native American side, but the point has been reached where nothing can pull the young man back from violence and destruction. He’s not the only one closing in on the Devil Marauders though, so he may have to move fast to get the revenge he craves.

Genshi is a tormented man. Nightmares of the night his family was brutally murdered haunt him, and he has started seeing visions of a supernatural force promising death and power; however, the young warrior only longs for two things: becoming a full-fledged Iga clan shinobi and openly claiming the love of his master’s daughter, Lady Akemi. Genshi is marked by something that will challenge his sense of honor and ability to do his duty to those he loves most.

The creative team behind Escape from Jesus Island is back with the fourth installment in the action-horror-sacrilegious series about an unscrupulous corporation that claims to have successfully cloned Jesus Christ and a skeevy pope who wants the son of God for himself to perform a personal miracle. The epic battle between Barracuda and Goliath at the end of book three left the Vatican Black Ops team at a serious disadvantage, since they fled to the tunnels on Malsum Island, the territory of Damien’s cadre of failed genetic experiments and so-called freaks.  Can Mary, Joe, Boomer, and Jet make it out of the tunnels and back to their boat? Why are Damien’s healing abilities growing so rapidly? Why does Anna care so much about the Jesus clones’ healing abilities anyway? All these answers and more lie within Issue #4!

We live in a world inundated with books and movies focusing on dystopias: The Hunger Games, Divergent, The Fifth Wave, The Maze Runner, etc. It’s easy to believe that the economic crises and international political upheavals starting in the late 1990s created a market for stories about corrupt governments and damaged societies, but the genre has much deeper roots. Logan’s Run, based on the 1967 novel of the same name, debuted in theaters on June 23, 1976, and given there’s hardly a dystopian novel or film without my name written all over it, I’m shocked I hadn’t seen it until now.

My immediate family is made up of introverts and geeks, but somehow I never was fully exposed to Star Wars (or Star Trek for that matter) as a child. I occasionally saw bits and pieces at friends’ houses, but it never grabbed my young imagination. (Frankly, I was convinced it was a very long, very dull movie.) As I grew older, I simply dismissed the original trilogy as something "not for me: . . . until Star Wars: A New Hope was re-released in theaters in 1997. 

Ever since she was seventeen years old, Dale Highland has been on the run: from her unexplained murderous blackouts she calls Rages; from an aunt who clearly despises her; from a world that she just doesn’t quite manage to fit; however, a chance encounter with a stranger pushes the young woman to face some bizarre truths about who, or maybe what, she really is. Thrust into a cat-and-mouse chase from a powerful, otherworldly organization, Dale needs to choose what she finds most vital to being herself and ultimately whether having supernatural blood prevents her from being truly human.

Game of Thrones Psychology: The Mind is Dark and Full of Terrors is an upcoming book full of essays delving into the psyches and psychoses of the various cast members of the popular Game of Thrones universe. Several contributors to the book gathered at WonderCon in Room 515B to share their thoughts with fellow enthusiasts and share their expert opinions about the "best and worst" people of GoT.

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