Robert J. Baden, Fanbase Press Contributor

Robert J. Baden, Fanbase Press Contributor

 

47 Ronin 2I’ve been waiting a while to see this issue, after the first being released a few months back, so I’ve wanted to keep up with the story and hoped that I would not be disappointed when it finally came out.  I wasn’t; in fact, I continue to enjoy how the story has unfolded, bringing the historical legend to life in a very colorful fashion.  I only hope that Dark Horse will release the issues a little faster than three months apart, even if it is a limited, 5-issue series.

SPOILERS BELOW

Darths  DroidsWorld of Webcomics is a series devoted to exploring the world of online comics and their target audiences, as well as their art styles, storylines, and the general enjoyment that they provide.


I’ve never had the opportunity to play a Star Wars tabletop RPG—I almost never tabletop anymore, sadly—and I’ve often wondered what it would be like, so I was very happy when someone showed me this particular comic.  Take all six films and act them out as tabletop game, with six individual campaigns, and then throw in the characteristics of some classic tabletop geek archetypes, mixed with photo stills from the films themselves, and you’ve got yourself a webcomic.  Photo stills aren’t anything new—Irregular Webcomic did it, my recent review of Troops of Doom showed that they do it—but the fact that the characters are themselves playing characters is really interesting to me.  Right off the bat, the comic pulled me in with the conversation between the PCs and the GM being hilarious to read; it took me back to my tabletop days, and that’s what really kept me going.  Darths & Droids updates Sundays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays at darthsanddroids.net.

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

 

Pantalones TX *Please note that this advance review is based on a non-final copy of the graphic novel.


As a geek with a warped sense of humor, I have read and watched some very unusual things over the years (Excel, Saga, and FLCL come to mind), but this is one of the most unusual comics I have ever read.  I’m not entirely sure what the creator (Yehudi Mercado) was thinking when he made this graphic novel, but I will say this much: at least the ending makes sense (within the confines of the story itself, that is, which overall doesn’t).  I’m not sure if I’m likely to ever read something else with these particular settings and characters—or other stories from the creator that are much like this—but I’ll give him this much: he kept me entertained while I read it.  This graphic novel is due to be released in February, 2013, if the world doesn’t end before then.

SPOILERS BELOW

 

Y The Last Man coverWay before I started having an active interest in most comic books, a very close friend of mine introduced me to this then-recently finished series.  I was pretty hesitant at first due to having only read certain comics before, but, at the encouraging of my friend, I read the series and really enjoyed it, not because of the artwork, but because of the “what if” scenario that played out.  I’m a bit of a sucker for “what if” scenarios, seeing where things might have gone had things been different in even the slightest fashion, so this really appealed to me on several levels; however, there were some things about it that did their best to keep me away from finishing it (both times I read through it), but the overall storytelling really kept me interested.  There’s been talk of making a feature film adaption, and I know there have been some fan-film productions already made, so I hope that they keep to the core of the series, even if they cut away a bit of the dressing.

SPOILERS BELOW

Girls with SlingshotsWorld of Webcomics is a series devoted to exploring the world of online comics and their target audiences, as well as their art styles, storylines, and the general enjoyment that they provide.


Over the years I have randomly come across webcomics that I normally wouldn’t have found, and Girls with Slingshots is one of those random finds.  At first it took a little bit of time to get into the story, but I quickly discovered that I really enjoyed the characters and the situations that they end up in—even though some of them are a little farfetched for a “slice-of-life” comic such as this (but, then again, I’ve read Real Life, so that’s not hard to imagine).  Danielle Corsetto does an excellent job of putting together a very emotional and funny comic that really captures my attention, and I look forward to reading the adventures of Hazel and her close friends; this comic has easily become one of my all-time favorites (and there aren’t that many that have).  Girls with Slingshots updates every weekday at girlswithslingshots.com.

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

BW Dr. M 3The comic book event of the summer is nigh!  Before Watchmen, the much-anticipated prequel series to Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' Watchmen, will consist of seven limited series and an epilogue one-shot.  Stay tuned, as the Fanboy Comics crew will be reviewing each title as it is released. Hurm. 

 

 

The story continues to unfold concerning the background of Jon Osterman, but my faith in the storytelling of J. Michael Straczynski has continued to fall beyond the faith that I’ve put into him over the years.  I was hoping that my inability to get into Rising Stars was a fluke, given how much I’ve enjoyed his other work and how big of a Babylon 5 fan I’ve been over the years, but this issue just confirms how little of his recent writing abilities I have liked.  There was a saving grace, however, in that we learn more about Osterman’s life, in a very interesting fashion—at least from a historical point of view (says the historian).  With only one more issue to go, will JMS be able to bring me back into the fold?  I kind of doubt it, but I have some hope.



MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

 

Declan and Chang Sweet FA Issue Number 1 coverBlatant violence doesn’t always grab my interest, and when it is involved, there has to be a hook that will keep me coming back for more. And, that’s what this comic did. At first, I wasn’t sure what to make of it, and I didn’t think I was going to like it much, but the first issue ended with such a cliffhanger that I just had to find out what happened next. And then, at the end of the second issue, my interest was still piqued. I’m still not sure what to make of it overall, as gratuitous violence and profanity don’t always hold my interest, but I’m more than willing to find out, and I hope others are, too.

SPOILERS BELOW

 

LEGO LOTRThe LEGO games have remained pretty consistent with many of their features over the years, but there have been some very noticeable changes with each production, such as the inclusion of voice actors for LEGO Batman 2, but there are several differences in this latest addition to the LEGO game roster.  Likewise, the level of frustration has grown with the differences, and I believe that the game plays way more like a traditional RPG (if you can believe that) than should be possible.  But, regardless of the frustration and annoyance that completing this—and the other LEGO games—brings about, I still had way too much fun with all of the jokes thrown in.

SPOILERS BELOW

 

Amazing Spider-Man 692Sidekicks and partnerships are a staple of superhero comics, especially during the “Golden Age,” and several well-known characters have been a part of it—the best known probably being Batman and Robin; however, one superhero above all else has never had a sidekick—even though he’s had some partnerships—mainly because he first started out as a teenager, the traditional age one is when made a sidekick.  I am sure some thought he would have ended up the sidekick of someone else, not being the mentor of another, but that’s just what happened recently to Spider-Man . . . and it utterly failed.

SPOILERS BELOW

Dumbing of AgeWorld of Webcomics is a series devoted to exploring the world of online comics and their target audiences, as well as their art styles, storylines, and the general enjoyment that they provide.


Dumbing of Age is a lot like other webcomics I have read—it is centered around college life, there’s a “superhero” involved, there are a lot of relationship situations going on—but there is one defining difference that makes it a worthwhile read, and that is that it is an alternate reality comic of most of David Willis’ characters.  As a fan of his other webcomics—Roomies!, It’s Walky!, Joyce and Walky, Shorpacked—it is interesting, enjoyable, and sometimes a little frustrating to see his characters in a different setting; I’ve come to expect them to act a certain way, and they still do, to an extent, but there are several mannerisms and actions that are drastically different than their other portrayals.  Even so, it is still very fun to read and updates Monday-Friday at dumbingofage.com.

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

Page 12 of 22
Go to top