L. N. Conliff, Fanbase Press Contributor

L. N. Conliff, Fanbase Press Contributor

Not all art is about entertainment. Sometimes, art exists to challenge, teach, or heal us. A better way to describe art is to say that all art exists to help us. How it helps us changes from piece to piece. I had the opportunity this week to read Ingrid Chabbert’s Waves, the topics of which are of a grim seriousness that I don't want to obfuscate or shy away from. I'll start this review by saying that if you're searching for a lighthearted comic book, you might want to pass on this one. If you’re looking for something that will move you and, quite possibly, help you in your own life, then you need to learn more about Waves.

I wish I had a more inspired rationale for why I choose the comics I'm going to read. Many are either properties I already like or recommendations from other fans. When it comes to finding new works, I tend to choose based on the cover and title. The one good thing about this is that I often go into stories with little to no expectations which is exactly how I approached Ghost Tree #1.

Alien. Is there a more perfect name for the juggernaut of science fiction horror? The name conveys exactly what you need to know while remaining about as simplistic as you can get. I love the original Alien film. The Xenomorph remains my personal favorite design for an alien entity, and Sigourney Weaver's Ellen Ripley is one of the most iconic female leads ever put to screen. As far as Alien's extended lore is concerned, it can be quite a mixed bag. A colleague of mine has been raving to me about the quality of William Gibson's Alien 3, but it seems for every victory there's an Aliens: Colonial Marines. With a bit of eager trepidation, I decided to pick up Aliens: Dead Orbit by James Stokoe and try my luck.

Star Wars Adventures: Tales from Vader's Castle has been on my radar for a while now. The Star Wars extended universe, both new and old canon, contains some of the greatest moments in the history of the franchise. (I'm looking at you, Star Wars Jedi Council: Acts of War.) I held off on getting into this miniseries, because I wanted to read the story as a finished product, and, luckily, that product has arrived in the form of this box set.

Solo: A Star Wars Story lands in a weird place in the Star Wars legacy. It isn't nearly as divisive as The Last Jedi or as generally crowd pleasing as The Empire Strikes Back. Solo is the first Star Wars movie to just slip under the radar which is a shame, because Solo is a great movie. It has its flaws, but so does every Star Wars movie. I was honestly surprised to see Star Wars: Solo the graphic novel adaptation pop up. I assumed the movie would be all but forgotten after its less-than-stellar box office debut.

If, like me, you lurk on the various social media outlets of the world, you've probably encountered Sarah Graley's Our Super Adventure at least once. It fits squarely in the emerging genre of shareable webcomics. I'd probably read half the comics in this collection before it even came ou,t but that didn't stop me from picking up Our Super Adventure: Press Start to Begin.

If you've only been following the Steven Universe TV show and haven't delved into the comics, I have a secret for you: They're amazing. If you have no clue what Steven Universe is, then here's an extra secret: It's amazing. I've only had a few opportunities to pick up these comics in the past, but every time has been a delight. Steven Universe: Fusion Frenzy #1 was no exception.



Fantasy is one of those genres that comes in waves. Sometimes, we’re lousy with good fantasy material, and, sometimes, it’s a dearth so severe, we’re begging for even a scrap of magical realism. Throughout the past few decades, though, comic books have been putting in the legwork to produce new and interesting fantasy concepts that usually take television and film a few years to catch up on. Shades of Magic Volume 1: The Steel Prince caught my eye for this exact reason; it looked like it could be something entirely new.



If you're a frequent reader of Fanbase Press, you might remember that I reviewed the first volume of Mob Psycho 100 a few months ago. That strange manga, brought to us by the same artist responsible for the incredible One Punch Man, charmed me with its bizarre narrative and simplistic art style. Well, we're back for round two with Mob Psycho 100 Volume 2.


I was about seven years old when my brother first showed me Starcraft. This juggernaut of a game was instrumental in forming my tastes on the science fiction genre as a whole. The series is now best known for its competitive scene, but I was fascinated with the exciting and mysterious lore the game hinted at in its campaign. I, admittedly, dropped off with the series around the time of Heart of the Swarm, but Starcraft Volume 1: Scavengers, with its retro logo and cover art, reminded me of those early days playing the game on some long-forgotten PC.

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