Tommy Zimmer, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

Tommy Zimmer, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

Dead of Winter continues to prove itself as one of those comics you need to buy as soon as possible. Not only is it original, but it takes the concept of a survival tale and sends it in an interesting direction. Kyle Starks (writer) and Gabriel Bautista (artist) make very deliberate decisions with the story that continue to pay off in spades. The writing and artistry in this story are so good that they end up leading to fun, new events in every issue.

Coyotes is a unique tale in how its narrative is designed and unfolds. Sean Lewis certainly has an idea for his Western tale that he spins. With the jarring opening, Lewis uses this to put the reader in the middle of the story. It causes us to ask questions about what exactly is happening and why the new officer on the force ended up in such a situation. And then, we are introduced to our main protagonist who seems to be the one responsible for exactly what was happening. The officer moves into the next situation and seeks to take the girl to be questioned.



‘Clue #5:’ Comic Book Review

Clue has been a series that should not end. Yes, the premise is such that the narrative will end because of how things are done with Clue. Yet, the storytelling and characterizations of all of the people in the story have been great. There have been no problems whatsoever with anything happening within the story. What is truly notable is exactly how Paul Allor (writer) and Nelson Daniel (artist) were able to take the story from a classic film and turn it into an amazing series that not only stays true to the original film but makes it modern, so it doesn't seem out of place for today's audiences.



The X-Files: JFK Disclosure #1 proves to be one of the best comic book stories that anyone will read this year. Not only is it filled with intrigue and suspense, there's a great deal of the whole JFK conspiracy tying into the backstories of the two famed protagonists of the series: Mulder and Scully. If you like both of the characters, there's a great deal of pathos given to the characters, as well as utilizing the story of what happened to America's 35th US president.



Rugrats #1 serves as a reminder that there is still a place for Rugrats in our world. It's been a long time since the characters from Rugrats took another form in All Grown Up!, where teenage versions of the characters took focus beginning in April 2003 and lasting until August 2008. It was the next step for the characters but not much was done with them following the series. Tommy Pickles and the gang vanished from pop culture until now with this series. If you read it, you can already hear the voices of the actors who originally portrayed the characters. It's remarkable how much Box Brown, the writer, is able to recreate the voices of the characters. The art by Lisa DuBois also serves to show just how great the story can come about.



Fighting American #1 is an exciting start to a very colorful series that brings us back to "simpler times" and then places us right in the forefront of the future. It's quite fascinating to look at just what we are getting with this series. Writer Gordon Rennie and artist Duke Mighten join forces to not only place us in the center of an amazing series but give us a great introduction to all the different characters. This series will likely become larger than life with time.

The War for the Planet of the Apes series has been an example with each issue of how a comic book should be written and drawn. While the comic certainly ties into the feature film that was released this summer, it stands on its own in many ways and in some ways surpasses the film series. Writer David Walker has a great command over Caesar and also the narrative as a whole. He portrays Caesar as a complex and multifaceted character that is as interesting to read about as any other character in the series; however, Jonas Scharf really brings the series to the next level with his artwork.

First Strike #4 focuses on Scarlett and her past relationship with Coulton. We get an idea of where she came from and the relationship between the two. The series is a fascinating mashup between multiple different brands available to IDW. For Optimus, it's a pretty intimidating situation. He's being held to task by Elita One and Sunstreaker for the war the Transformers have been waging. With Scarlett, you are able to get the human perspective as to the war that has been going on.

Samurai Jack Quantum Jack #1 is a strange compilation of Samurai Jack and Quantum Leap. In some way, it's like the original television series, and in some ways, it isn't. For readers, that might not be a bad thing. Similarly to the show, there is not so much dialogue used. Fabian Rangel Jr. and Warwick Johnson-Cadwell are certainly looking toward the art telling much of the story, which comics can do quite well in such a framework. In this sort of tale, Samurai Jack is taken out of his normal timeline and placed in alternate realities. It's an interesting notion of taking Jack away from his usual plain of existence and into something completely different.



Star Wars Adventures #1 is a mixed bag. Writer Cavan Scott tells two very different stories that do not seem to have much in common, as they are different and are not about the same characters. The first story is very much the writer telling the same tale as the one found in Star Wars: The Force Awakens. This proves to be the stronger of the two stories for its consistency of voice and interesting story it plots. Most Star Wars fans know the scavenger, Rey, who they came across in Episode VII.

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