Tommy Zimmer, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

Tommy Zimmer, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

War for the Planet of the Apes is a story of humanity and apes at a crossroads. Neither faction really want war, but some feel they need to engage in it to prove a point to the other. It is the essence of basic and real warfare that occurs in the real world even today. The problem lies in their organization. Neither the humans nor the apes seem to have a good deal of it. There seem to be factions that wish to go against the main goals of both.

What's particularly notable about Clue and what separates it from the original movie is that it lets the audience in on the joke. This whole series is being manipulated by two people throughout the comic, and writer Paul Allor wants you to be completely aware of that. He's not interested in making the big reveal that the butler did it when half of the audience reading this comic probably is aware that is going to be the end. So, he is showing you right away that the butler, Upton, is indeed the likely culprit and is manipulating this entire story. But, he's not alone, and this is what changes things from the original film, where Mr. Boddy is simply a consequence of the plot. Here, he is indeed an important part of the book.



Dead of Winter is definitely a good surprise. At first look, you might think it's just The Walking Dead set during the wintertime. Yet, as you begin to page through the story, you start to see it's a much different zombie experience than its predecessors. In fact, this comic actually makes fun of the whole setting it's in. In that regard, it is pretty original. The characters, while they are fighting for their lives, do not take themselves too seriously whatsoever.  Writer Kyle Starks knew exactly what he was doing when he put this story together. Paired with its tongue-in-cheek humor and a great cast, every page is another gold mine.



Are you a fan of both the original Ghostbusters such as Bill Murray and Harold Ramis and the new Ghostbusters like Melissa McCarthy and Kristen Wiig? If you've ever dreamt of the two Ghostbusters groups teaming up, Ghostbusters 101 is truly for you. Separated by two dimensions, the characters have come together to fight ghosts on Ellis Island. This is quite similar to how DC Comics and Marvel Comics do their multiverse crossovers within their imprint. It affords creators to allow many well-beloved characters to coexist side by side when they may have not otherwise. It's always easier to just put them side by side in one universe but, often times, they could be in another universe altogether.



Clue writer Paul Allor and artist Nelson Daniel continue the momentum they started in the first issue. The primary focus of this issue is the investigation itself. The characters have already gone through and met one another for the most part. The design of this issue is to begin the investigation, as well as to further the relationships that have begun among the characters. In this way, Allor tosses his audience back into the thick of it as he adds some paranoia to the characters, leading them to act differently from how they normally would. It's thoroughly entertaining to watch all of the characters go about their actions and decisions.

War for the Planet of the Apes lives up to what you would expect from the series. There's the human surviving faction, and then there are the apes, led by Caesar, as established by the current film franchise; however, this series offers writer David Walker and artist Jonas Scharf a unique chance to expand the palate of the story. It also gives them the chance to design mystery and suspense tied around new characters for their story. The result of their work is not only an evocative and attention-grabbing first issue, but something that reminds us of other powerful apocalyptic survival stories like The Walking Dead or Apocalypse Now.

Transformers: Till All Are One proves to be a game-changing issue for the most part. Starscream and Windblade are at the center of the issue. While the issue starts with a recap of past events, it quickly moves into the main aftermath of everything that happened in the past and how it has impacted the Transformers in the present. For any fans of the Transformers films or TV series, this is a much different setup than the traditional universes for the character. It's refreshing to see these characters with challenges and given different arcs as to which they face difficulties on their path.

The first issue of Clue brings to mind many memories of the mid-'80s film. Most of the original characters from the film are back, such as Mr. Boddy and Mrs. Peacock; however, there are new characters, too, such as Dr. Orchid and Sen. White. It's fun to see just how much this first issue resembles the opening of the film. You get the mandatory introduction of all the characters arriving at the mansion, as well as seeing them all interact with one another. The personality dynamics are quite engaging and fun to enjoy.



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