Tommy Zimmer, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

Tommy Zimmer, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor

Rugrats #1 serves as a reminder that there is still a place for Rugrats in our world. It's been a long time since the characters from Rugrats took another form in All Grown Up!, where teenage versions of the characters took focus beginning in April 2003 and lasting until August 2008. It was the next step for the characters but not much was done with them following the series. Tommy Pickles and the gang vanished from pop culture until now with this series. If you read it, you can already hear the voices of the actors who originally portrayed the characters. It's remarkable how much Box Brown, the writer, is able to recreate the voices of the characters. The art by Lisa DuBois also serves to show just how great the story can come about.



Fighting American #1 is an exciting start to a very colorful series that brings us back to "simpler times" and then places us right in the forefront of the future. It's quite fascinating to look at just what we are getting with this series. Writer Gordon Rennie and artist Duke Mighten join forces to not only place us in the center of an amazing series but give us a great introduction to all the different characters. This series will likely become larger than life with time.

The War for the Planet of the Apes series has been an example with each issue of how a comic book should be written and drawn. While the comic certainly ties into the feature film that was released this summer, it stands on its own in many ways and in some ways surpasses the film series. Writer David Walker has a great command over Caesar and also the narrative as a whole. He portrays Caesar as a complex and multifaceted character that is as interesting to read about as any other character in the series; however, Jonas Scharf really brings the series to the next level with his artwork.

First Strike #4 focuses on Scarlett and her past relationship with Coulton. We get an idea of where she came from and the relationship between the two. The series is a fascinating mashup between multiple different brands available to IDW. For Optimus, it's a pretty intimidating situation. He's being held to task by Elita One and Sunstreaker for the war the Transformers have been waging. With Scarlett, you are able to get the human perspective as to the war that has been going on.

Samurai Jack Quantum Jack #1 is a strange compilation of Samurai Jack and Quantum Leap. In some way, it's like the original television series, and in some ways, it isn't. For readers, that might not be a bad thing. Similarly to the show, there is not so much dialogue used. Fabian Rangel Jr. and Warwick Johnson-Cadwell are certainly looking toward the art telling much of the story, which comics can do quite well in such a framework. In this sort of tale, Samurai Jack is taken out of his normal timeline and placed in alternate realities. It's an interesting notion of taking Jack away from his usual plain of existence and into something completely different.



Star Wars Adventures #1 is a mixed bag. Writer Cavan Scott tells two very different stories that do not seem to have much in common, as they are different and are not about the same characters. The first story is very much the writer telling the same tale as the one found in Star Wars: The Force Awakens. This proves to be the stronger of the two stories for its consistency of voice and interesting story it plots. Most Star Wars fans know the scavenger, Rey, who they came across in Episode VII.

Ghostbusters 101 #6 concludes a major plot point from the beginning of the series. It seems to end the dimensional rift that is causing the two universes of the old Ghostbusters and more recent Ghostbusters team to come together. Seeing them interact within this comic gives the reader the chance to fully understand the scope of everything. Dr. Ray Stantz is leading the troops out in the streets in order to fight the ghost trapped between the two universes, linking them together.



IDW's Donald and Mickey reads less like old stories involving the characters and more like a cross of stories between the old '60s Batman television series and Hannah Barbara cartoons like Scooby-Doo which became infamous. Of course, these stories obviously have Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse in them, but it's a tad confusing when the villain in Mickey's story seems similar to both The Riddler and a random ghoul from an episode of Scooby-Doo. In one direct reference, writer Andrea Castellan makes in "The Big Fat Flat Blot Plot," she names one of the cops as Chief O'Hara, a character who had great fame in Batman on Fox during the 1960s.



War for the Planet of the Apes is a story of humanity and apes at a crossroads. Neither faction really want war, but some feel they need to engage in it to prove a point to the other. It is the essence of basic and real warfare that occurs in the real world even today. The problem lies in their organization. Neither the humans nor the apes seem to have a good deal of it. There seem to be factions that wish to go against the main goals of both.

What's particularly notable about Clue and what separates it from the original movie is that it lets the audience in on the joke. This whole series is being manipulated by two people throughout the comic, and writer Paul Allor wants you to be completely aware of that. He's not interested in making the big reveal that the butler did it when half of the audience reading this comic probably is aware that is going to be the end. So, he is showing you right away that the butler, Upton, is indeed the likely culprit and is manipulating this entire story. But, he's not alone, and this is what changes things from the original film, where Mr. Boddy is simply a consequence of the plot. Here, he is indeed an important part of the book.



  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1  2 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
Page 1 of 2
Go to top