S.T. Lakata, Fanbase Press Senior Contributor

S.T. Lakata, Fanbase Press Senior Contributor

When characters die in a story, it’s not always clear what the resulting impact will be from the person’s absence. In Lifeformed: Cleo Makes Contact, it’s made clear that the main character will be dealing with an alien invasion “and her father’s death.” Dark Horse Books tells you up front in the synopsis, but it’s not enough. It still doesn’t prepare the reader for the shock that comes within those pages, and that translates to the story being told by writer Matt Mair Lowery and artist Cassie Anderson.

The British Library is celebrating the 20th anniversary of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone with a new exhibit, “Harry Potter: A History of Magic.” This display will stand for approximately four months, as a “thrilling, new exhibition that will showcase a fascinating display of wizarding books, manuscripts, and magical objects and combine centuries-old British Library treasures with original material from Bloomsbury’s and J.K. Rowling’s own archives.” Bloomsbury Publishing has partnered with the library for the original work’s publication anniversary.

Where would Harley Quinn be without the Joker? Quinn’s first appearance in Batman: The Animated Series shows her as a sidekick to one of the most notorious villains in comic book history. This one episode, with a runtime of 22 minutes, established a foundation for a character that is loved and seen at conventions, as fans adorn her various attires to cosplay.

Are there other ways for students to get involved with science, other than school fairs or creating demonstrations or experiments at home? Actually, if you live in Virginia near Newport News, you have a legitimate opportunity to explore the wondrous world of Jefferson Lab.

What makes a science fair a special experience for students? Is it the opportunity to learn how to do something, seeing other completed projects, or is it simply the love of creating something really cool?

It’s quite often I think about my kids’ future. Do they want to play soccer or start ballet? What kind of music or movies will they love? Will they continue to love learning, as much as they seem to now? And occasionally, I wonder, what should I do if they struggle with anything in school?

Poltergeist (1982) might be the first movie I saw as a child that frightened me and kept me coming back for more, because of the wondrous, supernatural elements and the unknown. As an adult with two kids, there are fewer times that I relive or think about moments from my youth, and the passing of Tobe Hooper, director of Poltergeist, makes me instantly remember the impact this particular film had on the following years of my childhood.

Ion Grip is a futuristic tale that mixes government spy agencies and space adventures into one. The story is filled with classic ray guns, intergalactic action sequences, vibrant colors, and a main character who sometimes fails to win a fight.

I remember there were Starburst®. I think it was my first movie experience, although it’s sometimes hard to decipher the earlier years of my childhood now that I have my own children. I remember sitting in the theater – red seats, a darkness that comes with the lower lighting - and feeling excited for being in that giant room. I don’t think I ever realized, quite possibly until right now, that my love of going to the movie theater came from that first experience. The sense of awe from being in such a special place, eating candy, and then the lights dimming. The huge screen came to life, and I was hooked from that point forward.

If you feel, or are made to feel, minimalized or insignificant in any way, then read Mech Cadet Yu #1 from BOOM! Studios. In a world dreamt up by writer Greg Pak, where those in a particular class are the only worthy ones, fate intervenes in a way we can all hope for – realizing that anything is possible.

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