Nicholas Diak, Fanbase Press Contributor

Nicholas Diak, Fanbase Press Contributor

Colin’s Godson is a Scottish power pop band from Glasgow who take their music to a transmedia level. Aside from releasing their particular brand of power pop/Britpop/punk-pop via digital, cassette, CD, and vinyl means, they also flirt with the comic book medium. The physical releases of their music, such as Colin’s Godson in Space and The Timely Demise of Colin’s Godson, all have comic books, starring the band in outlandish adventures, as part of their packaging. The Colin’s Godson Annual collects these comic adventures into one 84-page omnibus. As with the physical releases of their albums and EPs, the Colin’s Godson Annual was produced in an extremely limited quantity (20 copies in this instance). The collection includes the comics Colin’s Godson in Space, Colin’s Godson in Time, Colin’s Godson Comic No 2, Colin’s Godson at the Speed of Sound, The Timely Demise of Colin’s Godson, and Colin’s Godson in Silicon Heaven with parody adverts and games peppered throughout.

The comedic, Lovecraftian, buddy-cop series, Vinegar Teeth, continues into its second issue as Buckle and Vinegar Teeth continue about their police business in Brick City. The momentum at the end of issue one, with a super-powered cultist fleeing via the roof tops, is placed on hold in this issue with the focus shifting to more character development and lifestyle depictions. Buckle is shown to have a soft spot for a song called “Share that Nice Daydream.”  He initially relaxes to an LP of it in the bath until Vinegar Teeth accidentally blows up his apartment playing a tuba, and then moves to a bar to see a live performance of it. While on duty, Buckle and Vinegar Teeth are called to a bank robbery in progress being committed by a chapter of the Woodland Scouts (a Boy Scout parody). The scouts are able to get away by blowing up the bank with kerosene and firecrackers, but not before Vinegar Teeth saves Buckle.

Love is in the air at Fanbase Press! In this magical month of romance and enchantment, the Fanbase Press Staff and Contributors decided to stop and smell the roses. Throughout the week of Valentine’s Day, a few members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their personal love letters to the areas of geekdom they adore the most.

‘Beyond Night:’ Book Review

Una Salus Victis Nullam Sperare Salutem!

“Lovecraft meets Lethal Weapon!” is the tagline Dark Horse is using to describe their newest original series, Vinegar Teeth. Written by Damon Gentry (Sabertooth Swordsman), with artist Troy Nixey (Jenny Finn) and colorist Guy Major (Robin, Green Arrow), Vinegar Teeth is an interesting amalgam of buddy cop police procedural, Lovecraftian cosmic horror, and carnivalesque humor, and thus the succinct tag line.

Sword of Ages, Gabriel Rodriguez’s (Locke and Key, Little Nemo: Return to Slumberland) five-issue miniseries that is a mixture of sword and planet with Arthurian legend, begins its second issue with Avalon, along with her traveling companions Lancer, Trystan, and Gawyn, traveling atop the Guardian of the Lake (a large dragon) to a small island with a sacred cave, wherein they encounter a chamber of monsters and a legendary sword stuck in a large green gem (Sword of Ages’ parallel to Excalibur and the Sword in the Stone). Meanwhile, the Black Star Templars are shown to be conquerors from the stars, staging a military campaign called “Operation Stormbringer” to bring their particular brand of law to the planet. The White Monks, briefly alluded to in issue one, are formally introduced. Their leader’s son, Lord Calen (who has feelings for Avalon), leads a scouting missing to spy on a meeting of the Black Sun Templars and the Red Clan. The two groups plot a siege against the White Monks, and while attempting to report this information back, Calen is captured.

Gabriel Rodríguez’s Sword of Ages is a new series from IDW, a neo-peplum comic that combines the sword and planet genre with Arthurian legend. Sword of Ages tells a variation of the origin of the fabled Excalibur by placing the story on a different planet (portrayed as being littered with both ancient and futuristic ruins) and concerns the heroine Avalon, who has been raised by tigers and trained by monks. The first issue sees Avalon part from her tiger family to travel with Merlin (blue-skinned in this incarnation) and his black bird Nikola to rendezvous with a team of other adventurers (Trystan, Lancer Benveek, and Gawyn) and gain an audience with the serpentine Guardian of the Sacred Lake. En route, Avalon and company thwart a band of Planet of the Apes-esque slavers and free their prisoners, which introduces Captain Janek, the supposed law and order of the region.

Sherlock Frankenstein and the Legion of Evil is a four-issue miniseries and spinoff from Dark Horse’s Black Hammer series. With the original run of Black Hammer ending at issue thirteen, planning to be resumed with a new series titled Black Hammer: Age of Doom in the spring of 2018, Sherlock Frankenstein acts as stop gap for fans of the series, approaching the Black Hammer world with emphasis on its villains. The original Black Hammer saw Spiral City’s superheroes vanish to a rural farm in an alternate dimension after defeating the Anti-God. Sherlock Frankenstein sees Lucy Weber, the daughter of Black Hammer and also reporter for The Global Planet, investigating the disappearances by questioning the various supervillains of the city, who were left with no adversaries.

Stan Lee’s LA Comic Con 2017 had a variety of panels, reunions, and Q&A sessions lined up in its programming. One particularly nostalgic panel was that of the 1980s cartoon, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe, commemorating its thirty-fifth anniversary, which was held Saturday, October 28, at 11:00 a.m. In attendance on the reunion panel were Alan Oppenheimer (Skeletor), Melendy Britt (She-Ra), and Tom Cook (Filmation animator).

There are quite a few ways to celebrate Halloween and the general spookiness of October, such as marathoning scary films and binge-reading horror comics and books. Gamers often turn to playing horror-centric video games during the month. The newly created #horrorgameoct hashtag is being used to call attention to the practice, with gamers announcing their intentions to play popular survival-horror games such as those from the Resident Evil, Silent Hill, and Dead Space series. It is also a perfect opportunity for some to revisit forgotten or cult games, such as Deadly Premonition and Phantasmagoria. It’s even an excuse to play off-beat or periphery scary games too, such as Dr. Franken and Corpse Killer.

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