Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Jeff Lemire and Dean Ormston’s meta tale of superheroes without a story has sprawled every which way since its first issue about two years ago. I say “without a story” not because things haven’t happened - so much has happened - but because for much of the series our heroes have been without anything to save. Their story was stripped away from them, and they’ve been forced to live out different stories. What happens when you take away a superhero’s main reason for existing?

Reading She Could Fly is like slipping into someone else’s madness, and it fits far too comfortably.

I have reservations making the review of Humanoids’ newest Life Drawn title, States of Mind, about me, but, in many ways, the purpose of this graphic novel is to show people that are struggling with depression, bipolar disorder, manic depression, and other mental health disorders that you’re not alone. As someone who can get lost in depressive states, stories like this are good to keep on hand.

It’s time to return to Nailbiter and the town of Buckaroo one last time.

The Tuskegee Airmen are the prime influence for Black Hammer ’45, as a squadron of pilots during Black Hammer’s version of WWII. This version of WWII is bonkers in all of the perfect ways. Superheroes and supervillains weave in and out, giving us some chaotically fun dog fights, with giants guarding the borders of countries, Russians marching along in giant mech suits, and in the midst of this, the heroes of the Black Hammer squadron doing their best to complete their mission – sans powers.

On a normal day in a supermarket, people gather to partake in a daily tradition. Something we don’t even think about; it’s second nature. We’ve moved from hunters and gatherers to purchasers and complainers. Customer service has taken on the slowly evolving task of the big hunt. We hunt for coupons now: deals - the ability to go about our business without being bothered. This is how the story of Dark Rage - inspired by true events - begins. Moments later, men in white masks, armed to the teeth, lay waste to nearly a dozen shoppers. It’s bloody, it’s tragic, and it changes the lives of two women who become inexplicably tied together, forever.

I somehow missed reading and reviewing issue #10 of Coda, but that just meant I had the pleasure of reading two issues last night. And what a pleasure it was!

Black Badge #8 was a body slam to the soul. The most unexpected thing that could have happened did, and it was far more upsetting than I could have imagined it would be. It sat with me for a couple weeks. Why? Because Black Badge is not lazy storytelling. That’s probably the best compliment I could give to a creative team.

Little Bird was a comic book series I didn’t know I needed, and yet, there it was. A true artistic vision of a strange, yet familiar, world in comic book form. An experience that seemed to draw upon my love of Alejandro Jodorowsky and other surrealists like him.

Gideon Falls #12 begins the story of the laughing man, the entity that inhabits the Black Barn in the world of Gideon Falls. This issue is a nightmarish puzzle box that begins in 1886 on the frontier, as Father Burke and other local townspeople, including the sheriff, discover that Norton Sinclair is behind a series of murders, and they go to his barn to get him. For those who haven't been following along, Norton Sinclair is a recognizable name, and the barn is not a safe place, to put it mildly. We all know that this is the worst idea imaginable to go into the barn after Sinclair; they do not know that – but quickly find out. Father Burke is sucked into the world-altering reality of the Black Barn after coming face to face with the laughing man.

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