Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

Phillip Kelly, Fanbase Press Contributor

The incredible dynamic of this artistic team is working at full force with their series, Manor Black. I was a really big fan of Bunn and Crook’s Harrow County and of Bunn and Hurtt’s The Damned. The three together make a really fantastic team.

Hoo-wee! I cackled openly and often while reading the first issue of Matt Kindt and Wilfredo Torres’s new series, Bang! Think James Bond with a Philip K. Dick flare, both in quite the literal sense.

I love a good Hellboy tale more than almost anything else. Like Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman or Lone Wolf and Cub, his stories are a comforting place to return to.

In this issue, Bernice sets out with her goblin friend to find the source of the music that’s bringing the dead back to life in Harrow County. It’s World War II, and many of the dead are soldiers who are bringing comfort to the families upon their return; however, there are also dark forces coming back and taking the living with them.

I really enjoyed the first volume of Blackwood, a sort of Harry Potter-like story for college-age kids dealing with occult and Cthulu-like baddies. It turned out the headmaster was one of these baddies and had put a curse on the new kids that their fates would perish with the school. One of those kids did. Of course, there was another villain, and it became a dark story of failed love in the end. It was fun.

I’m so happy that #StoriesMatter to me. That I can pick up an issue of a comic book by one of my favorite writers, knowing that I’m going to be taken someplace completely unexpected. That’s how I always feel reading a book by Simon Spurrier.
Having relished his previous series, Coda, I was 100% ready to dive into his next creator-owned project.  Here it is: Alienated - a sci-fi take on what it means to be a loner in high school. The first page of this issue will never prepare you for the final page, and that’s what I love!

While this is not the penultimate issue, Ronin Island’s end is drawing nigh. All of the forces are converging on the island of refugees that our young heroes have so bravely sought to protect. Hana and Kenichi, beginning this story just as they became adults, were put to a much bigger test than the those faced by the island. Fighting against and for a new Shogunate, fighting against and for each other, every step of the way they have learned something new about themselves and what it means to sacrifice for a greater cause.

It’s not often these days that I’ll see a movie in the theatre more than once. Who has time? It has to be something really special - truly unique - to draw me back in for a repeat, big-screen presentation. I just finished my second viewing of Richard Stanley’s Color Our of Space, based on the H.P. Lovecraft short story. I fell immediately in love with the film, which I had incredibly high expectations for upon my first viewing. The second viewing not only confirmed that love, but nourished it.

The After Realm is a well-written tale from one of my favorite artists: Michael Avon Oeming. While the first 99% of the story tackles what is a fantasy adventure tale about a young Elven ranger named Oona, the final page of the comic opens the flood gates to what might be a pretty bonkers, post-fantasy world overridden by the elements of chaos.

Gideon Falls hits a crossroads as it wraps up its fourth story arc. The great evil known as the Smiling Man is getting ever closer to what he wants: Danny. The rest of the characters try their damnedest to fight back. Although, how do you grapple with something that lies beyond comprehension? Is a victory a real victory? Is a defeat a real defeat? My mind is bent. Every step that creators Lemire, Sorrentino, Stewart, and Wand take is even more unexpected than the previous one. This is storytelling on a mythic scale. At the same time, it never loses sight of the personal journeys of its characters within this expansive, breathtaking puzzle.

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