Madeleine Holly-Rosing, Fanbase Press Contributor

Madeleine Holly-Rosing, Fanbase Press Contributor

I jumped on this review, as I had the pleasure of watching the excellent German TV show based on the Babylon Berlin series of novels by Volker Kutscher, and I was curious to see how the graphic novel differed from the TV series. It became clear very quickly that it adhered more rigidly to the novels than the series did, and given the constraints of a graphic novel, I understand why.

Action, action, action. That is what the final installment of The Lost Fleet: Corsair from Titan Comics is all about.

In a dystopian future where most of the Earth is covered in water and the debris of a long-forgotten time, there are two worlds: the Noble Houses who live on dry land and the Chasing Arrows who live under the sea.  The Chasing Arrows are responsible for recycling all of the old plastic and other refuse that takes up most of the ocean.  Metal and other precious commodities go to the Noble Houses while the rest is used to power the old, massive ships now reconfigured as habitats for the Arrows. In essence, they are salvagers. They also manufacture their own food by farming plankton and sea fungus which, apparently, is not very tasty.

Words have power. That is the underlying theme of the comic, Word Smith, another independent project that I stumbled upon on Kickstarter that hails from Australia. Created and written by Stephen Kok, illustrated by P.R. Dedelis, and with colors by Peyton Freeman, it is an all-ages fantasy Steampunk comic with a well-meaning, yet somewhat naive, protagonist named Victoria and her mischievous pet dragon, Sparky.  

In this fourth issue of The Lost Fleet: Corsair from Titan Comics, former POW Captain Michael Geary of the Alliance Fleet has agreed to work alongside former Syndic Executive Destina Aragon. After successfully commandeering a cruiser from a Syndic CEO, the Alliance and former Syndic crew have more trust issues and a new target to deal with.

One of the hardest things to do when you are a creative person is to sell your own work, especially when our society is stuck on this notion that all artists/writers/creators must starve and suffer for their art.  Well, Russell Nohelty is here to tell you that it’s a load of crap in Sell Your Soul: How to Build Your Creative Career, and I agree with him. Luckily, he’s also written a handy-dandy guide to walk you through the emotional and practical aspects of selling your work.

Do you love military sci-fi? If yes, it’s not too late to come on board The Lost Fleet: Corsair.

Captain Michael Geary, grandnephew of Alliance legend Captain John "Black Jack” Geary, should be on his way home after the Alliance won the war against the Syndicate, but their captors have other plans for their prisoners. Fortunately for him, Executive Destina Aragon, commander of the remains of the 1252nd Syndicate ("Syndic") ground forces regiment, has made him an offer—join their mutiny or remain a prisoner.  Guess which one he chooses?

Saved New York City is on the brink of collapse, but can it be rescued from the White Wizard and his daughter, Chloe? That question is answered in the final issue of Snowfall, where science and fairy tale meet.

I love unusual superheroes, and indie comic book writer Matt Garvey and artist Dizeve, bring us one in The Ether #1.  A rather dapper person who wears purple latex gloves and a skull-fitting map of what looks like London on their head, Mr. Ether’s superpowers seem to lie in not only his detective skills, but also in the realm of a being parkour expert rather than have any magical or supernatural abilities (though perhaps we see these later in the series).

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