Madeleine Holly-Rosing, Fanbase Press Contributor

Madeleine Holly-Rosing, Fanbase Press Contributor

Gothic imagery and Lovecraftian nightmares are at the heart of the graphic novel, Hopeless, Maine. It is a story about isolation and loss, magic and demons, and how the two are inexorably intertwined. Originally a webcomic, Hopeless, Maine is now available in print.

One of humanity's greatest challenges is dealing with time. We want to keep it, save it, and turn it back. But, what if we actually could? What if we had the technology that allowed us to manipulate our destinies? Would you do it or just let it ride?

The following is an interview with author Arthur Slade (Dust, Flickers, Mission Clockwork). In this interview, Fanbase Press Contributor Madeleine Holly-Rosing chats with Slade about the writing for middle grade and YA fiction, his creative process, the upcoming projects that he has in the works, and more!

What happens if you’re a soldier who has fought a war millions of light years from Earth and you want to go home? You find out firsthand that the theory of relativity has changed from a theory to your new reality.

I love dogs: big dogs, small dogs, medium-sized dogs. It doesn’t really matter. So, when Odie popped up on my Kickstarter radar, I had to go and check it out. From Mississippi comes a fluffy butt Corgi with attitude, heart, and the will to survive.

If you don’t already know, I’m a huge fan of military sci-fi. From Jack Campbell to John Scalzi to Orson Scott Card to Elizabeth Moon, they all have something to offer. But now, it looks like Joe Haldeman has jumped into comics once again with an ongoing series from Titan Comics. I had the pleasure of getting a signed copy of The Forever War, Vol. 1: Private Mandella at Forbidden Planet in New York in 1990. The new comic series is based on his second series of novels set in the same universe.

I jumped on this review, as I had the pleasure of watching the excellent German TV show based on the Babylon Berlin series of novels by Volker Kutscher, and I was curious to see how the graphic novel differed from the TV series. It became clear very quickly that it adhered more rigidly to the novels than the series did, and given the constraints of a graphic novel, I understand why.

Action, action, action. That is what the final installment of The Lost Fleet: Corsair from Titan Comics is all about.

In a dystopian future where most of the Earth is covered in water and the debris of a long-forgotten time, there are two worlds: the Noble Houses who live on dry land and the Chasing Arrows who live under the sea.  The Chasing Arrows are responsible for recycling all of the old plastic and other refuse that takes up most of the ocean.  Metal and other precious commodities go to the Noble Houses while the rest is used to power the old, massive ships now reconfigured as habitats for the Arrows. In essence, they are salvagers. They also manufacture their own food by farming plankton and sea fungus which, apparently, is not very tasty.

Words have power. That is the underlying theme of the comic, Word Smith, another independent project that I stumbled upon on Kickstarter that hails from Australia. Created and written by Stephen Kok, illustrated by P.R. Dedelis, and with colors by Peyton Freeman, it is an all-ages fantasy Steampunk comic with a well-meaning, yet somewhat naive, protagonist named Victoria and her mischievous pet dragon, Sparky.  

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