Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

In the world of international affairs, secrets are a major commodity. That is especially true when there's war involved and seems to ring even more true for Marcus King, a mysterious man with a lot of truths buried. When we first meet Marcus, things aren't going so well. While we don't really get to see much of what's really going on here just yet, it's looking pretty likely that we're going to get to see Marcus do some pretty crazy things, and it's only going to get more ramped up from here.

Despite some of the recent disappointing developments in the world of Mass Effect: Andromeda, the comic book tie-in series, Mass Effect: Discovery, continues to go well. When we last left things, Tiran Kandros was well on his way to discovering the truth behind the Andromeda Initiative, the massive undertaking that will lead the many races of the Milky Way to the far reaches of space - to find a new home, a new life, and a new beginning. Despite the wonder that such an adventure can inspire, Kandros is under the belief that there's something more nefarious at play here, and he's been tasked with finding that out.

To start things off, I want to say this: Douglas Adams is my hero, both literary and otherwise. His work has influenced so much of what I enjoy in the world of entertainment, and the newest Dirk Gently series, The Salmon of Doubt, particularly marked my interest, especially since The Salmon of Doubt was slated to be the title of an upcoming Dirk Gently project. That it coincides with the BBC America series, as well, is a welcome addition, since the first season of the show was particularly well done.

Dark Horse Comics is one of the most well-known publishers in the business, and one that is known for being willing to work outside the typical structure. When it comes to mini-series, this is especially true, and Spell on Wheels is no exception.

Tie-in comics are generally kind of hit or miss, and that especially goes when they're tied to video games, a medium that generally allows for so much more expansive lore than any other medium can give. That goes even more so for games like the Mass Effect franchise, which is a huge, expansive universe that the games only scratch the surface of, in most single titles. As the video game series has gone on, we've learned a great deal, and that is usually gained through huge, eighty-hour playthroughs that take us on massive and beautiful journeys.

As another arc of The Wicked + The Divine passes, we are once again gifted a look into the past with another one-shot. This time, we turn to Rome, as the creative team takes a new view into the history of the once and now great civilization, this time focusing more on one of our less-attended-to Gods, Lucifer. While their passing in the main story was something both fans and the characters themselves still feel, getting a chance to give Lucifer the spotlight is a great way to still showcase the skills of the mischievous deity.

The Dragon Age franchise lives on, as Dark Horse Comics continues the tales of Thedas in the newest series based on the terrific gaming franchise. While this one is only adjacent to the franchise (unlike the previous series, Magekiller), this seems to be an added part of the lore, while Magekiller felt like it was directly from the canon of the games.

Simon Moore's situation seems to keep getting worse and worse with each issue of Hadrian's Wall. He's been given the runaround, betrayed, tricked, and manipulated by members of the crew, as it relates to the death of Edward Madigan, a member of the team, as well as the husband of his ex-wife, Annabelle. This would be enough for anyone to deal with, but there's also the lingering problem of Simon's pill addiction. Oh, and rebels from the Earth-settled planet Theta have taken over the ship, making things much more difficult. Good times, it seems, for Simon.

In the last near-decade, Jamie McKelvie and Kieron Gillen made their mark on the world of comics in a big way with their hit series, Phonogram. After reading over 500 pages of the completed collection of the series, I realized two things: It's one of the most British things I've ever read, and it's also one of the most brilliant. Collecting the three major arcs (19 issues, along with some shorter pieces within the universe), The Complete Phonogram lives up to the hype the series has garnered as one of the most iconic series in recent history. With that being said, let's start the show.

The end of “Imperial Phase (Part One)” is here, and with it comes one hell of a party.  This is a pretty stark contrast to the way the rest of this arc has gone, with most of it being a bit more dour, what with this whole “Great Darkness” thing coming, and all of the Gods being a bit more divided on the whole subject, and each other.

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