Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

This year's HollyShorts had a great cadre of films on their roster, and some of the more interesting ones were during the Period Piece block. With a focus on a time period, each one brings its own attitude and thoughts to whatever period it chose, with films ranging from World War II to the early 1990s and much, much more.

Dance and music are incredible art forms to express through film, as so much of it is subjective and much not actually spoken. From musicals to interpretive dance, these films push the boundaries of the way films can be made and how art can be expressed through different mediums.

One of the biggest parts of festivals like this is the ability to show off not just films from American creators, but those from other parts of the world, as well. This block of films focuses on international filmmakers, giving them all a chance to show the beauty of their work.

This year's HollyShorts Film Festival is full of brilliant minds creating beautiful films, all dedicated to a specific genre or audience. For this block of films, the creators were all focused on young people and their experiences. The filmmakers are both focused towards a younger audience and by a younger audience. With that being said, here are the selections for this year's Youth Block at 2017's HollyShorts.

The following is an interview with Daniella Rabbani, director and co-star of the film, OMA, which will soon be appearing as part of the 2017HollyShorts Film Festival. In this interview, Fanbase Press Contributor Russ Pirozek chats with Rabbani about the inspiration behind the film, the perspective that it offers on behalf of the survivors of the Holocaust, her creative process in working with the cast and crew, and more!

In the latest issue to the adaptation of the mobile game based on the hit television show, Rick & Morty, we find more trouble in the alternate reality where Mortys are captured and forced to fight one another for the amusement and sport of the many, many Ricks out there in the world. As we follow the One True Morty (or at least that's who it seems to be), this world begins to get much more complicated, and far more bizarre, in true Rick & Morty form. With the popularity of the show, and despite it only beginning to air its third season, Pocket Like You Stole It already draws from a very deep and diverse history of the alternate realities, and multiple different forms, of our beloved protagonists.

Looks like we're getting ourselves into the next part of “Imperial Phase,” and so far, we're looking at a lot of set-up. As the solicit for this issue stated, this is an issue where Dionysus sits in a darkened room for most of it, but in an awesome way. This part of the issue runs a bit slower than we've been getting accustomed to in some of the more recent issues, but it's been an interesting way to start bringing things together as Dionysus meets with Baphomet in the Morrigan's underground.

Mass Effect comics are really great, and Discovery is no exception. So far, this extended look into Mass Effect: Andromeda has allowed readers to get the one thing players of the games will likely never see: more exploration into this world. With Tiran Kandros investigating the Andromeda Initiative and what he believes to be the shady dealings of its founder, Jien Garson, he's begun to find a common thread: a Quarian scientist named Shio'leth that seems to be the link between what he believes to be the real impetus behind the Inititative and the good its claiming to try to do.

The world of Bankshot has returned, and things are really beginning to get interesting as we begin to uncover the past - and the future - of vigilante and potential terror threat Marcus King. As we've seen before, King had a bit of a rough time while he was in service, as a mission gone awry left him paralyzed and in a bad way, both physically and emotionally. In this issue, we begin to see the impact that event had on his life, and his mission to get revenge on the man that put him in that state, a man known only as “The Dutchman.”

To start things off, I have to say that God Hates Astronauts was one of my favorite things to ever exist in comic book form - especially in a collection, as the ridiculousness of the book was a better read in that iteration than it was in an issue-by-issue format. So, when Curse Words was announced, it felt like a wonderful continuation of a beloved book. Teaming with famed writer Charles Soule, God Hates Astronauts creator Ryan Browne has brought his trademark wit and silliness to a series that wouldn't work without it.

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