Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

Mass Effect comics are really great, and Discovery is no exception. So far, this extended look into Mass Effect: Andromeda has allowed readers to get the one thing players of the games will likely never see: more exploration into this world. With Tiran Kandros investigating the Andromeda Initiative and what he believes to be the shady dealings of its founder, Jien Garson, he's begun to find a common thread: a Quarian scientist named Shio'leth that seems to be the link between what he believes to be the real impetus behind the Inititative and the good its claiming to try to do.

The world of Bankshot has returned, and things are really beginning to get interesting as we begin to uncover the past - and the future - of vigilante and potential terror threat Marcus King. As we've seen before, King had a bit of a rough time while he was in service, as a mission gone awry left him paralyzed and in a bad way, both physically and emotionally. In this issue, we begin to see the impact that event had on his life, and his mission to get revenge on the man that put him in that state, a man known only as “The Dutchman.”

To start things off, I have to say that God Hates Astronauts was one of my favorite things to ever exist in comic book form - especially in a collection, as the ridiculousness of the book was a better read in that iteration than it was in an issue-by-issue format. So, when Curse Words was announced, it felt like a wonderful continuation of a beloved book. Teaming with famed writer Charles Soule, God Hates Astronauts creator Ryan Browne has brought his trademark wit and silliness to a series that wouldn't work without it.

With the popularity of Rick and Morty, there are plenty of different ways to get your fix of the hit series. There's apparel, games, toys, and tons of other media in which to interact with the show. That includes comics, and along with the standalone Oni Press series, the publisher has now begun releasing spin-offs, this time focused on the Pokemon-style mobile game, Pocket Mortys. This collectible game lets you play as Rick as he travels through dimensions, capturing and battling different types of Mortys and becoming the world's greatest Morty Battler. This is also the experience we get in the new series, as it puts the attention on the original Morty, known as “Plain Morty,” as he fights for his life, attempting to escape from Rick and his quest to collect all the Mortys known to the universe.

Well, it looks like we're back. After a small break in the main series, our favorite series about decadent and self-destructive gods returns with what is being called “the second half of a double album,” with the opening of the newest arc, “Imperial Phase II.”  With the insanity that came with the last arc, things aren't pretty for the remaining gods left in the cast, especially since they're not only working against the mysterious and powerful being known only as “The Great Darkness,” but with the fallout from some major reveals that we knew as readers, but certain characters did not. And oh, things not go well when everything was out in the open.

In the world of international affairs, secrets are a major commodity. That is especially true when there's war involved and seems to ring even more true for Marcus King, a mysterious man with a lot of truths buried. When we first meet Marcus, things aren't going so well. While we don't really get to see much of what's really going on here just yet, it's looking pretty likely that we're going to get to see Marcus do some pretty crazy things, and it's only going to get more ramped up from here.

Despite some of the recent disappointing developments in the world of Mass Effect: Andromeda, the comic book tie-in series, Mass Effect: Discovery, continues to go well. When we last left things, Tiran Kandros was well on his way to discovering the truth behind the Andromeda Initiative, the massive undertaking that will lead the many races of the Milky Way to the far reaches of space - to find a new home, a new life, and a new beginning. Despite the wonder that such an adventure can inspire, Kandros is under the belief that there's something more nefarious at play here, and he's been tasked with finding that out.

To start things off, I want to say this: Douglas Adams is my hero, both literary and otherwise. His work has influenced so much of what I enjoy in the world of entertainment, and the newest Dirk Gently series, The Salmon of Doubt, particularly marked my interest, especially since The Salmon of Doubt was slated to be the title of an upcoming Dirk Gently project. That it coincides with the BBC America series, as well, is a welcome addition, since the first season of the show was particularly well done.

Dark Horse Comics is one of the most well-known publishers in the business, and one that is known for being willing to work outside the typical structure. When it comes to mini-series, this is especially true, and Spell on Wheels is no exception.

Tie-in comics are generally kind of hit or miss, and that especially goes when they're tied to video games, a medium that generally allows for so much more expansive lore than any other medium can give. That goes even more so for games like the Mass Effect franchise, which is a huge, expansive universe that the games only scratch the surface of, in most single titles. As the video game series has gone on, we've learned a great deal, and that is usually gained through huge, eighty-hour playthroughs that take us on massive and beautiful journeys.

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