Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

It's been a bit since this series launched, with another issue hitting stands a bit later than expected. That's forgivable, given how daunting this series must be to make and craft into the masterwork that it is. We're surely in it now, though, as this issue is a bit bigger, with some major shake-ups coming for our slowly dwindling set of gods and their ever-increasing problems and flaws.

Despite some of the more divisive parts of the Rick and Morty franchise, their comic book offerings have always been a steady stream of laughs and ridiculousness. With publisher Oni Press' decision to introduce one-shots of supporting characters a few times a year, the ability to be even more insane grows with each passing issue. The current installment focuses on a beloved bit character and everyone's favorite murder-loving assassin, Krombopulos Michael.

This book is hard to describe. While the general premise (Gods return for 2 year, then die, only to be reborn again.) isn't so tough to explain, when issues like this one come along, where reading it becomes a tale of two halves, it complicates things a bit, especially as the true narrative of the book begins to unravel, with the Great Darkness approaching and everything flying full steam into the endgame.

I wanted to start this review with a few caveats: I haven't seen many of the DC Animated Universe films, though the ones that have been seen are enjoyable, and I hated Suicide Squad. I hated it a lot. So, when the opportunity to review the newest DC Animated Universe film, Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay, came up, I really wanted to give it an opportunity. Thankfully, there was a lot to enjoy about this foray into the DC Universe.

The dawning of a new era in a publishing company is a wonderful thing, especially when you can watch it from the very onset and see it develop. This is the case as we watch the newest publishing imprint of Starburns Industries, SBI Press, begin to release their newest works to the world.

Chuck Palahniuk is one of the most brilliant and prolific writers of this era, with several major novels to his name and some of the most thought-provoking and occasionally terrifying stories that have been written. While it's not my favorite of his novels, Palahniuk will likely always be remembered for Fight Club, his opus about mental illness, chaos, and toxic masculinity, among other things. The film adaptation, despite being a bomb during its release, is a cult favorite, and Palahniuk's work, while controversial, has been more and more interesting as time has followed.

In a book in which things go south quickly all of the time, it's worth saying that things are headed in that direction with haste after the revelations of the last few issues. With everything happening and things coming to a head, true identities are revealed, intentions are dug up, and the gods we've spent so long with are truly reaching the final days of their two-year lifespan. Without giving away too much, Minerva's recent admissions are bringing out the worst in some of the gods, and Woden's antics are actually beginning to show some promise for the first time in quite awhile.

So it comes. With the release of this issue, we begin what is dubbed as the final year of this series. That likely means with two more arcs, along with a few specials, this series will be officially wrapped up. This is bittersweet, since this has been a great series, but now we finally get the answers we've been waiting a long time for. There's been a lot of speculation about how this series is going to play out, and to finally be on the precipice of reading it is very exciting.

As the series has gone on, one of the pillars of each The Wicked + The Divine arc is that, as a precursor, we get a look at our beloved gods at a different point in their lives during one of their short, two-year stays in the world of the living.

Starburns Industries, best known for being the animation studio that created Rick and Morty, recently announced that they were starting a comic book label. One of the first titles to be released through the company is Gregory Graves, and with us here today is co-writer and co-creator Eric Esquivel! Eric has an amazing history in the comic book industry, with credits from DC Comics, Archie, IDW Publishing, and many more. The following is an interview with Esquivel conducted by Fanbase Press Contributor Russ Pirozek about his partnership with acclaimed writer and creator Dan Harmon, his love of Superman, and more!

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