Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

Russ Pirozek, Fanbase Press Contributor

In the last near-decade, Jamie McKelvie and Kieron Gillen made their mark on the world of comics in a big way with their hit series, Phonogram. After reading over 500 pages of the completed collection of the series, I realized two things: It's one of the most British things I've ever read, and it's also one of the most brilliant. Collecting the three major arcs (19 issues, along with some shorter pieces within the universe), The Complete Phonogram lives up to the hype the series has garnered as one of the most iconic series in recent history. With that being said, let's start the show.

The end of “Imperial Phase (Part One)” is here, and with it comes one hell of a party.  This is a pretty stark contrast to the way the rest of this arc has gone, with most of it being a bit more dour, what with this whole “Great Darkness” thing coming, and all of the Gods being a bit more divided on the whole subject, and each other.

Back again is one of the best and most insane books in Image Comics' current roster, Curse Words. In this world, magic exists, and the magic in this world is mostly done by one guy - Wizord - who is, you guessed it, a wizard of sorts. In previous issues, he's used his totally legit magical powers to do some pretty great things; Wizord turned people platinum, shrank a baseball stadium, and basically impressed the whole world with his wizarding abilities. But during that time, there's been a whole other thing going on with Wizord's home world. There's been some major upheaval in the Hole World, mostly as its leader attempts to destroy Wizord for betraying him in this whole “Destroy the world” bit he has.

When we last left our crew of stalwart and increasingly more impatient Gods, they were doing what all large groups of Gods with limited time left and a rising threat on the horizon do: sit around and vote on what to do. With the Great Darkness in retreat for now, the group - in all of their wisdom - chose from three options: fight the thing, study it, or kind of just do whatever and who cares. The latter won out, because of course it did, and this issue gets the anarchy going in a big way. The factions of Gods have splintered once again, with several looking to study, some preparing for battle, and others doing anything (or anyone) that strikes them.

Awhile back, I was given the opportunity to review William Dickstein's Ch05En. In a unique world where science is able to figure out something spectacular, things aren't always as they seem. The world now has access to genetic mapping that can show a person if they have a latent gene, one that will allow for those with the gene to be someone of great importance, including those who have powers. Our lead for this second volume is the same as the first, the feral but soft-spoken Grizz. When we last left Grizz, he had abandoned his life as a teacher and superhero with the Global Heroes Society in favor of long-time lover and, at the time, adversary, Mische. This innovative ending sets up for the second volume of the series, which shows Grizz and Mische as the two are now on the run and attempting to move on with their lives.

Before we really get started on this review, I need to mention something, and this goes for series creators Keiron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie. You two are really making it tough to do my job here, because what is there to say about a book that has been consistently excellent for over two years? With the fourth part of the “Imperial Phase” arc underway, the team of Gillen and McKelvie have brought things to a new level as the myth of The Great Darkness, a long-thought lie of Ananke, proves to not be so untrue, doing the very little thing of attacking members of the Pantheon.

For nearly thirty years, the name Slayer has been synonymous with some of the most controversial and brilliant heavy metal to ever exist. As a pioneer of thrash metal, the group has cause plenty of ruckus, both positive and negative. But there's no denying the impact they've had on the world, and now they're looking to expand their influence with the release of their first comic book series, Repentless.

Ever since the magnificent and insane God Hates Astronauts, I have been a fan of writer/artist Ryan Browne. The absolute craziness of the series struck a chord with my sensibilities, and when I first heard about Curse Words, Browne's new project with superstar writer Charles Soule, I was pretty thrilled. Browne's ability to create ridiculous and bizarre worlds along with Soule's storytelling abilities was a match made in heaven, and this new Image series doesn't hold back.

When I first heard about the massive crossover that Top Cow Productions was undertaking with the release of Eden's Fall, a series that would take three of their top titles (Postal, The Tithe ,and Think Tank) and place them all together, I was incredibly excited. The company, along with fearless leader Matt Hawkins, has always been one of the more interesting smaller publishers on the market, taking big chances with very unique titles. It seemed only fitting that they take all of their work and fold them into one another, something that could lead to a wholly new kind of crossover.

Well, another issue of Wic/Div has been released, and with it comes some of the biggest revelations of the series thus far. We've basically been hearing for most of the series about the impending doom that is to befall our cadre of psychotic and hedonistic Gods once their ninety years on Earth are up. They're to die, without question, only to be reborn again some time later. Their fearless leader, Ananke, knew this, and in order to preserve this way of life, intended to sacrifice four of the Gods to stave off something called “The Great Darkness.” That didn't exactly go well, as the Gods revolted and killed Ananke, leaving everything kind of up in the air.

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