Michele Brittany, Fanbase Press Editorials Manager

Michele Brittany, Fanbase Press Editorials Manager

Having announced retirement at the beginning of this year, the 68-year-young Wrightson succumbed to brain cancer on Saturday, March 18, 2017, and it was devastating news to many in the industry. His artistic style was easily recognizable among the comic book titles on the shelves over the years, and he was an inspiration to many aspiring artists interested in taking a more classical approach to their illustrations.

The smell of aging books wafted through the main hall at the Glendale Civic Auditorium on Sunday, March 19.  Celebrating its thirty-eighth year, the one-day show boasts an affordable $5 admission and free parking, and, in return, attendees can browse the tables of over fifty vendors. While there were tons of vintage paperbacks of various genres – westerns, mysteries, science fiction, and horror – there were also hardback books of recent and classic fiction, original artwork, and back issues of Weird Tales, Amazing Stories, Illustration, and many other magazines. Books filled makeshift shelving units, stacked on tables, or in long boxes under the tables. It was all a matter of rooting around until you found a treasure that you could not be without.

Today marks the 20th anniversary of the premiere (March 10, 1997) of Joss Whedon’s television series, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which brought to the small screen Buffy Summers played by Sarah Michelle Gellar. Resourceful, perky, and The Chosen One, each week viewers became familiar with Buffy and her Scooby Gang, which included Willow (Alyson Hannigan), Xander (Nicholas Brendon), her Watcher Giles (Anthony Stewart Head), and eventually even Cordelia (Charisma Carpenter). These were all characters introduced in the first episode; however, it was always about Buffy, who provided the audience with a flawed, yet strong, female character to care about each week.

I was still living overseas when Buffy the Vampire Slayer premiered on televisions across America in the spring of 1997. I missed the initial interest at the time of its broadcast, and the series has only recently come to my attention because of its accessibility on Netflix and my being colleagues with the #1 Buffy fan. (I’m looking at you, Bryant!) As the resident Buffy the Vampire Slayer newbie who has just finished watching the first season, I admit I wish I would have actively sought this show out much sooner. It’s not like I’m not familiar with Joss Whedon – I have watched Firefly (LOVED IT!) and Angel (the first two seasons, so now the pieces are starting to coming together) – and his innate skill at creating engaging characters that audiences quickly grow to care about, so I am glad that I’m coming to the franchise at this point – better late than never! As a result, I found there are several aspects of this midseason replacement show (It replaced a cancelled show, Savannah.) to appreciate and enjoy. In Season 1, the characters, themes, and social commentary were all factors that resonated with me as I watched the first twelve episodes (out of 144) and became familiar with the show.

On Friday afternoon, February 17, 2017, while the biggest storm front in past few years moved into the Los Angeles region, prompting severe flood warnings, an undaunted group of 50 – 70 comic professionals checked in at the Long Beach Convention Center for the first annual Comic Creator Conference (C3). The conference, held the day before the Long Beach Comic Expo, brought together new and seasoned professionals in the comic book industry for a conference where knowledge and assistance could be shared, creating an opportunity to build and/or strengthen the attendees' business and profitability within the industry and in other mediums, according to Legendary Comics SVP/Editor-in-Chief Bob Schreck’s welcome letter in the program.

Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon was joined by three talents in the comic book and entertainment industries - Megan Hutchison (Rockstars, Will o’ the Wisp), Susan Lee (Wraith of Love, Shadow of the Knight), and Laura Lee Bahr (Angel Meat, Haunt) - for a fifty-minute panel at Long Beach Comic Expo 2017 titled “Women on the Dark Side.”

“There is nothing I fear more than someone without memory. A person without memory is free to do anything she likes.” ~ Lord Mokshi, Annals of the Legion


The Stars Are Legion is a new release from Saga Press, written by Hugo Award-winning author Kameron Hurley, whose other novels include the God’s War trilogy, The Mirror Empire, and Empire Ascendant; the latter two titles are from the Worldbreaker Saga series. In this story, readers are transported to a decaying system of worlds s– monstrously huge ships to be accurate – located in the outer reaches of the universe. Sisters by oath, Jayd and Zan are propelled on separate journeys with the same end goal to save their worlds by creating a new one. Each face daunting challenges: Jayd is a bargaining chip in a peace treaty so that Zan can try to successfully enter an elusive world that is the key to bringing about the end of political unrest, war, and division amongst the various worlds.

Love is in the air at Fanbase Press! In this magical month of romance and enchantment, the Fanbase Press Staff and Contributors decided to stop and smell the roses. Throughout the week of Valentine’s Day, a few members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their personal love letters to the areas of geekdom they adore the most.

“Slowly, desperately slowly it seemed to us as we watched, the remains of passage debris that encumbered the lower part of the doorway were removed, until at last we had the whole door clear before us. The decisive moment had arrived. With trembling hands, I made a tiny breach in the upper left-hand corner. Darkness and blank space, as far as an iron testing-rod could reach, showed that whatever lay beyond was empty, and not filled like the passage we had just cleared. Candle tests were applied as a precaution against possible foul gases, and then, widening the hole a little, I inserted the candle and peered in, Lord Carnarvon, Lady Evelyn and Callender standing anxiously beside me to hear the verdict. At first I could see nothing, the hot air escaping from the chamber causing the candle flame to flicker, but presently, as my eyes grew accustomed to the light, details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues, and gold – everywhere the glint of gold. For the moment – an eternity it must have seemed to the others standing by - I was struck dumb with amazement, and when Lord Carnarvon, unable to stand the suspense any longer, inquired anxiously, 'Can you see anything?' it was all I could do to get out the words, 'Yes, wonderful things.’”Howard Carter, Breaking the Second Sealed Door to King Tutankhamun’s Tomb, November 26, 1922

Love is in the air at Fanbase Press! In this magical month of romance and enchantment, the Fanbase Press Staff and Contributors decided to stop and smell the roses. Throughout the week of Valentine’s Day, a few members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their personal love letters to the areas of geekdom they adore the most.

Dear Mr. Urban,

I’m probably like many of your fans: I first saw you as the anguished Eomer from The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002, Peter Jackson) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003, Peter Jackson). With layers of hides on your back and long unkempt hair, your eyes conveyed the complexity of your character: sorrowful, yet brave. While you were not on the screen nearly enough, those scenes that you did have were pivotal. What an incredible opportunity to be part of a project that so defined fantasy for a new generation – it is no wonder you wanted to be part of it. I believe the experience may have set your course as a genre actor and I would say, also as a character actor, in part through the physical transformations you engage in for your craft.

I first met actor Richard Hatch at a Hollywood Collector’s Show held at the Marriott Hotel in Burbank, CA, in October of 2009. Soft spoken and engaging, he immediately exuded charm as a warm smile graced his face. Although he had a long television career that touched on several of the most popular shows of the time, he was still Captain Apollo from the original Battlestar Galatica television movie and series (1978 -1979) to me. Hearing of his passing on Tuesday, February 7, at the age of 71, felt akin to losing a long-time friend.

Page 1 of 12
Go to top