Erik Cheski, Fanbase Press Contributor

Erik Cheski, Fanbase Press Contributor

What do you think I am, crazy?  You’ll shut off the flashlight when I’m halfway across!

Say a flip to the flop, and it all goes pop.

I am not impatient…let me show you right now.


Only thing keeping a body outside is the walls.  Blow those down…everybody’s the same, dig?

Desert’s lonely.  Harsh.  People are worse.

Thinking later, shooty shooty now.

That's not the deal.

After Logan, it's kind of hard not to want to dive into more post-apocalyptic westerns.  Luckily, there are quite a lot of them.  Unfortunately, there's slightly less a number that are good, but Randall P. Fitzgerald has put something together that will engage and excite.  I know that's an odd thing for a Western to do, but the blended style actually works for the novel, Husks, he's put together.  I'm going to be honest: I've a mighty distaste for trilogies of late, but the part of this novel that stands on its own is well worth the time. 

The anomaly, my ship, my crew,  I suppose you're worried about your fish, too.

Last stop.

There are certain rides we all know that we shouldn't take - strangers with big vans, the cab without lights, some lady with a Jesus fish and beads on the seats - but some rides will really be your last.  The Greeks had Charon to ferry souls across the Styx to the afterlife, Disney made a pretty penny off of giving Davey Jones and the Flying Dutchman a similar task, and now Simon Birks, RH Stewart, Lyndon White, and Dan Thorens at Blue Fox Comics present the last thing that some jerks will ever need: hope.

Rule 63 in Sherwood

The Robin Hood stories have always had a strong following. There’s something about taking from the rich and giving to the poor that resonates well with the majority of folks…can’t imagine why.  The myth of the honorable thief mixed with an altruistic nature and forbidden love is hard for anyone to pass up.  It’s the story that has it all, which is why seeing someone hit it with an alternate vision is such fun. It allows us to separate ourselves from the tales as we’ve heard them before [whether Flynn, Bedford, Costner, Elwes, or Crowe are your seminal take (We can all agree it’s not Crowe, right?)] and apply the touchstones of it in new ways (i.e., stealing from the rich and giving to the poor could be the result of trying to trick a populace into support, hiding your true self of being altruistic, and all the best things end up lining the rich boy’s son’s pockets).  It’s a technique that can be very useful; changing minor parts allows the author to play us against the standard narrative and opens the world to incredible changes that can not only re-imagine a world that hasn’t been updated in a century or so, but broaden its message for the modern reader as well as being very entertaining.

Page 1 of 18
Go to top