Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Love is in the air at Fanbase Press! In this magical month of romance and enchantment, the Fanbase Press Staff and Contributors decided to stop and smell the roses. Throughout the week of Valentine’s Day, members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their personal love letters to the areas of geekdom they adore the most.

Radiant Black almost feels like two different stories stuck together. Most superhero stories have a juxtaposition between ordinary life and the fantastical world of powers and suits, but I’ve never come across one where that juxtaposition was so jarring. That’s not a bad thing or a good thing. It’s an interesting stylistic choice. It’s still just the first issue, so we’ll see how the choice plays out as the story progresses.

Making an animated Kung Fu movie is a difficult proposition. Martial arts sequences aren’t necessarily as impressive when the participants are drawn instead of real. Therefore, the filmmakers really have to work hard to make sure that those scenes are still compelling, and the film as a whole still keeps the audience engaged. I’m happy to report that Batman: Soul of the Dragon succeeds on that front in spades.

Adventureman gives a modern perspective to the adventure stories that were popular in the pulp novels of the ‘20s, the film serials of the ‘30s, and the radio dramas of the ‘40s. There are colorful characters, dastardly villains, and a whole world of possibilities. In short, it’s the sort of comic that’s right up my alley.

‘Shedding:’ Movie Review

Shedding is a strange, surreal film that is beautifully shot. I’m still not entirely sure what to think about it, but I definitely enjoyed it.

Christopher Sebela is a master at crafting intricate, fascinating worlds that grab your attention from the very beginning. A few years ago, I had the pleasure of reviewing Welcome Back, a series which explored forbidden love in a world of reincarnation and assassination. Now, with Pantomime, he’s exploring the bonds of chosen family set against the background of daring and elaborate heists—and that’s only the beginning of what this comic has to offer.

Superman: Man of Tomorrow is the latest offering from the DC Universe Animated movies collection — of which I’m generally a big fan - and this film doesn’t disappoint. Over the years, we’ve seen almost as many depictions of the Superman origin story as we have of the Batman origin story. We practically know it by heart, beat for beat. That’s not what this movie is. Rather, it’s an exploration of who Superman is and a glimpse at the journey he took in his early years, towards becoming the Man of Tomorrow.

On a tiny island near the edge of the Bermuda Triangle, there’s a veritable cornucopia of strange phenomena, from ghosts to zombies to mermaids to sea monsters, and much more. Half the people who come to this island are tourists. The other half are spies or supervillains.

Most of the DC Universe Animated Movies are rated PG-13. This often allows them to deal with more mature themes, rather than trying to make it “for kids.” Deathstroke: Knights & Dragons is rated R. That means that in addition to those mature themes, we also get a lot of blood—and two f-bombs.

I have occasionally wondered why the NASA program that sent people to the Moon was named after Apollo, the sun god, and not Artemis, goddess of the moon. Well, apparently, I’m not alone. NASA’s new initiative to return to the Moon is called the Artemis program. And fittingly, one of their goals is to put the first woman on the moon.

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