Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

I’ve been a fan of the DC Universe animated movies since they began in 2007. They’ve created some fantastic films and told some amazing stories. That being the case, Batman: Hush has a lot to live up to. Does it succeed? Well, it doesn’t quite have the depth, or the quality, of some of the best DC Universe films, but it’s certainly fun and enjoyable.

Madeleine Holly-Rosing’s Boston Metaphysical Society series spans several other comics, some short stories, and even a novel. It’s a beautiful and intricate world, with a lot to take in. The Spirit of Rebellion is billed as a standalone story which you can enjoy without necessarily being familiar with the rest of the oeuvre. Technically, this is true. Anything you do need to know about the previous adventures is covered deftly in Holly-Rosing’s introduction.

“The impossible isn’t a limitation—it’s an invitation.” These words, oft-repeated by a number of characters, are the driving force behind Impossible Incorporated. They open the door for everything from time travel to psychic communication to an exploration of the multi-verse—at least in theory. Most of what we get from this comic in actuality is metaphysical philosophy lessons.

The quirky jewel heist/buddy comedy continues, as suave jewel thief Mia Corsair and socially awkward hacker Brenda (a.k.a. “Killa-B”) prepare to steal the famed Net of Indra in broad daylight from a museum exhibit. The two are still working to bypass the exhibit’s security system, but Brenda can’t seem to concentrate, as she’s too busy thinking about her secret crush, a woman named Tallulah Blue who posts in the same online forum as “Killa-B.”

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart famously began composing music when he was only five years old. What was life like for him, being a musical genius at such a young age? What was it like for his family, having to put up with a five-year-old musical genius? That’s the premise of Young Mozart, a series of newspaper-style comic strips based on the composer’s early years.

The first thing you need to know about Samantha Spinner and the Spectacular Specs is that it’s, in fact, a sequel to another book. The second thing you need to know is that the plot synopsis on the inside flap of the book is almost entirely describing the first book, Samantha Spinner and the Super-Secret Plans, rather than the book you’re currently holding. In fact, even what the synopsis does say about the second book still happened in the first one to lay the groundwork for the sequel.

Kathy Sartori has been through a lot: murdered in the 1960s, coming back 50 years later, discovering that there’s a version of her out there who wasn’t murdered and who lived a full life in her absence—and then seeing that version of herself get murdered, as well. It’s a strange situation to be sure.

From the very beginning, this comic has taken us on a variety of different adventures through a myriad of different worlds. At times, it can seem confusing, even chaotic, but it is, in fact, all connected. Whether you know what’s going on or not in that particular moment, it’s always a fantastic ride.

As a special feature of The Fanbase Weekly podcast, the Fanbase Feature focuses on and celebrates a specific element of geek culture.

In this Fanbase Feature, Fanbase Press Contributor Steven W. Alloway chats with Los Angeles-based singer/songwriter Cortney Matz regarding her creative process, her upcoming EP, and more.

In today’s tumultuous political climate, the job of providing the world with clarity and perspective, once reserved for news anchors, has somehow fallen to late night talk show hosts. One of the people at the forefront of that movement is Stephen Colbert. This role he’s taken on, and the climate that led to it, were core themes throughout his panel at PaleyFest on Saturday night, March 16, 2019.

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