Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Doc Yeti is the kind of bizarre story that just can’t help but draw you in. It has everything: noir, action, mystery, comedy… and yetis. I don’t think I’ve ever read a comic about yeti culture before. It’s intriguing, to say the least.

This comic reminds me a good deal of the webcomic, Girl Genius. Both are set in sort-of-Steampunk worlds (though Girl Genius prefers the term “Gaslamp fantasy”) and both feature young female protagonists who are clever, ambitious, and just waiting to unlock their full potential. Also, both have absolutely fantastic artwork, which is essential in stories like this.

There’s a lot going on in Terminal Point. We’re thrust headfirst into the story right from the start and sometimes have to work to keep up. It’s worth the effort, though. It may be a little overwhelming at first, but as things unfold, we become ever more deeply immersed in the story and the world.

Love is in the air at Fanbase Press! In this magical month of romance and enchantment, the Fanbase Press Staff and Contributors decided to stop and smell the roses. Throughout the week of Valentine’s Day, a few members of the Fanbase Press crew will be sharing their personal love letters to the areas of geekdom they adore the most.

Dear Dr. Horrible,

It’s been nearly nine years now since we were first introduced. Three 15-minute episodes over the course of one week, and since that week, my life has never been the same.

When I first opened this book, I was thrown for a bit of a loop. It’s published by Dark Horse, so I assumed it would be a graphic novel. It’s not. It’s a regular text novel of nearly 300 pages. Since these require a much bigger investment of time than comics do, I probably wouldn’t have volunteered to review it had I known up front. That said… I’m glad I did. This was a rollicking space adventure that I honestly didn’t want to put down.

I’m not sure how I feel about this comic. On the one hand, the concept is rather an interesting one. It chronicles Biff Tannen’s rise to power and wealth in the alternate 1985. On the other hand… is that really something we need a comic about?

It’s been nearly a year since the first arc of The Rook wrapped up, and I’ve been looking forward to the next issue ever since. I was worried that I’d missed it. Well, I may have missed the next issue, but the next arc is here, and I’m pleased to report that it’s just as chock full of time-travel fun as the first one, if not more so.

The new Star Trek: Waypoint comic is an anthology series of short adventures from the various Star Trek worlds in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the franchise. Though the stories follow the characters we’ve come to know over the last half century, they’re designed to stand on their own. They don’t fit in with any specific sequence of events, and they’re probably not canon. In a lot of ways, Waypoint reminds me of the very first comic I reviewed for this site, Doctor Who Classics. It’s similar not only in structure, but in its style and tone.

Adamant is about a superhero who’s suddenly flung into a strange and unfamiliar future. In the first issue, we saw our titular hero arrive in this new world, completely bewildered by his surroundings (which included a human-sized talking frog, along with a very interesting evolution of slang). In this issue, we get to see a little more of this world and get a slightly better idea of just what’s going on.

The first issue of Warp Zone is fun, but a little difficult to follow. We’re introduced to several characters but aren’t really told who they are or what they’re about. As such, events are a little bewildering. Fortunately, in issue #2, we’re given a brief overview to help us keep things straight as we embark onto a strange and crazy adventure.

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