Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

Steven W. Alloway, Fanbase Press Contributor

The ‘90s were a simpler time, when the general public still wasn’t 100% sure what computers were capable of, and all that a movie character had to say was, “I’m a hacker,” and suddenly they were the most powerful person on the planet. The '90s gave us movies like Hackers, wherein cracking a computer was essentially a video game, and The Matrix, wherein hacking literally gave you superpowers.

What happens when you build your society on the words and actions of a genocidal madman? How do lifestyles and attitudes evolve after generations of fostering that mindset? Lightstep shows us some of the terrifying possibilities.

I was a little wary of this comic at first. On the one hand, I’m a massive fan of Dr. Horrible. (I even wrote a geeky love letter to him last year.) On the other hand, a comic where Dr. Horrible and Captain Hammer are suddenly best friends sounded like it could easily fall into the realm of weird and gimmicky.

I wish I had had this book to read when I was a kid. As a child of eight or so, I would have, if you’ll pardon the expression, eaten Time Sandwich right up. Reading it as an adult, I still ate it right up. If you know me at all, you’ll know that this kind of broad sci-fi/fantasy is the sort of thing I live for. It’s time travel at its finest.

I’ve always loved the Boston Metaphysical Society comics, from the original 6-issue arc to the more recent standalone featuring Granville Woods and Nicola Tesla. So, of course, when I heard there was a novel coming out, I was eager to read and review that, as well; however, truth be told, I didn’t think it would be quite as good as the comics. I’ve read novel adaptations of comics before, and while they’re fun, without the artwork, they usually fall short.

This isn’t your typical sci-fi story. It’s very understated—almost ordinary at times - which is not to say uninteresting. This simple, quiet story had me hooked from page one and kept me engaged all the way through.

It’s been nearly three years since I discovered (and subsequently reviewed) the Lumberjanes comic. It’s an amazing title, and I had nothing but great things to say about it. Unfortunately, I missed out on the opportunity to review the subsequent volumes and fell hopelessly behind on the story which is why I was so excited about this volume: a new, standalone Lumberjanes adventure.

I think the best audience for this comic is the diehard Disneyland fan who still has a sick and twisted side. I have several friends who fit this description, and, believe me, I’m going to be telling all of them that they need to read The Happiest Place.

In a world of superpowers, realistically, not everyone would take up the mantle of a hero or a villain. A lot of them would probably go into sports. That’s the concept explored by SFC Comics, and the titles they release, like Kasai.

What if you lived in an ideal world? What if the problems that plague our current world, like disease and climate change, were conquered long before you were born, and everything is perfect now. Would you sit back and relax in this perfect world? Or would you want more?

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