Sam Rhodes

Sam Rhodes (101)

Favorite MovieYojimbo
Favorite Game:  The newest version of Halo
Favorite Beverage:  Ballast Point's Big Eye IPA

Pariah #2 Review (And Preview!)

Following Sam's review, check out the six-page preview of Pariah #2, below!

 

So, if you read my review of Pariah #1, you know that the story takes place in 2025 North America and follows a hyper-intelligent, teenage "Vitro," short for in vitro genetic manipulation, named Brent Marks.  Unfortunately, Brent is not just super smart, he also happens to be socially awkward and determined to blend in with the crowd, despite being surrounded by a bunch of high-schoolers who see him as a freakish test-tube baby.  Brent's life gets very complicated, however, when a group of "Vitros" are blamed for a lab explosion and the subsequent release of a virus that kills thousands of people. Pariah #2 leaves Brent and, instead, follows the group of teen "Vitros" working at the lab, who are allegedly responsible for the release of the virus.  The fact that they seem to be the victims of a set-up doesn't stop the law from attempting to bring them down with alarming force.  Notice that word "attempting."  So, like a fiery, adolescent, and overachieving band of “Merry Men” (and Women), they remain in the woods, synthesizing moonshine and determining their next move.

 

Hobo with a Shotgun: A Film Review

More a tone poem than a movie, this thoughtful, vibrant film takes the audience on the placid, yet emotionally vibrant, journey of a Hobo with a Shotgun.  Actually, this movie IS a pretty incredible B-Movie along the lines of Robert Rodriguez’ Machete.  Coming from the exploitation camp, it has a similar genesis, starting as a fake trailer and winning first prize in Rodriguez’ South by Southwest Grindhouse trailers contest.  After accompanying select screenings of the Tarantino/Rodriguez Grindhouse double feature, it was then expanded into a feature length movie directed by Jason Eisener, written by John Davies, and starring Rutger Hauer in the title role.  Also, like Machete, this movie will not be for everyone, as it capitalizes on the gratuitous use of violence, vulgarity, and nudity, even reveling in it, as it pays homage to exploitation flicks of the past.  

Dear Fanboy Comics Readers:

 

FBC Staffers Sam and Ben Rhodes caught a preview of Captain America: The First Avenger on Thursday at San Diego Comic-Con.  Below is their video commentary on the film.

 

 

Crawl to Me, A Comic Book Review

You may know Alan Robert as the bassist and creative force behind the metal band Life of Agony, or maybe you caught his debut comic series Wire Hangers published by IDW.  Now, IDW is teaming up with Robert once again to publish the comic mini-series Crawl to Me about a young family confronted by something horrific after moving into their secluded new home.  Created, written, illustrated, and lettered by Alan Robert, this four-issue, mature-readers series aims to thrill and disturb you.

Pariah #1 Review

What I like in a comic is humor, action, charismatic, yet flawed, characters, a good story, and art that makes me want to sit down and draw then cry in the corner about how much I suck at drawing.  Aron Warner’s Pariah does this and more. 

 

Set to debut at San Diego Comic Con 2011, Pariah is a twelve-issue comic series that follows Vitros, genetically-manipulated teens endowed with super-human intelligence.  Issue #1 follows Brent Marks, a known Vitro, desperately trying to live a normal high school life while suffering the slings and arrows of being known as an uber-geek.  But, things go from bad to worse when the Vitro community, en-masse, is blamed for a fatal explosion in a military weapons lab and the subsequent release of a deadly toxin.  Caught up in a global panic, the Vitros become subject to a groundswell of persecution, as they are declared terrorists and hunted down.   

 

I have never read any of Richelle Mead’s novels, of which she has many, but I had the extreme pleasure of being able to review the first and second issues of the comic adaptation of her Dark Swan series, called Storm Born. I was blown away!  Mead is best known for her supernatural novels including the Georgina Kincaid Succubus series and Vampire Academy, the latter of which is Young Adult material.  With overt sexual situations and violence, Storm Born, however, is less friendly for younger audiences.   Mature readers should definitely check this series out, as issue #1 released on the first of this month and is available for order at most comic stores.

Richelle Mead’s Storm Born, from Sea Lion Books, is an exciting, supernatural romp through modern day America.  Adapted from her Dark Swan novel series by herself and Grant Alter, the story seems like an updated response to Lucas’ male-centric, Indiana Jones stories, but with a healthy dose of paranormal mystery.  We follow Eugenie Markham, a freelance Shaman who makes a living sending various creatures attempting to inhabit our world back to the occult realm, called the Otherworld.  Equipped with knowledge of magic, several enchanted weapons, and a wicked sense of humor, she travels the southwest battling spirits, elemental creatures, powerful fairy-like beasts called Gentry, and anything else that crosses her path.  Though I’ve only read the first two issues of what will be an eight-issue series, eventually collected into two graphic novels, I am already completely invested in the world that Mead has created.

FBC is gearing up for the 2011 San Diego Comic-Con and on our list of "stuff we HAVE to check out" is Aron Warner's comic series release, Pariah.  Government created, hyper-intelligent teenagers fleeing a frame-job terrorism charge?  Yes, PLEASE!  Check out all the nitty gritty below, and, if you're heading to SDCC, be sure to keep your eyes peeled for Pariah!!!

 

 



 

FROM THE MIND OF OSCAR-WINNING FILM PRODUCER ARON WARNER A NEW GENERATION OF SUPER-TEENS ARE INTRODUCED AT COMIC-CON 2011

 

Sea Lion Books Unites Warner, Eisner-Nominated Illustrator Brett Weldele and Writer Philip Gellat to Bring A Unique Group of Beyond-Intelligent Teen Fugitives to the Comic Book World This July.

 

Los Angeles, CA – May 25, 2011 – They’re not super powered, they’re just super smart. The teen protagonists who lead us through the world of Pariah, a twelve-book graphic novel series from the mind of Oscar-winning film producer Aron Warner and published by Sea Lion Books, are the next generation of heroes in the comic book world. Eisner-nominated illustrator Brett Weldele (The Surrogates) will bring the stories to life in ink, and Philip Gelatt will pen the scripts set in Warner’s world for the twelve books. As buzz builds about this unlikely collaboration and the unique story of Pariah, the series will premiere at San Diego Comic Con on July 20 – 24th.

Inglourious Basterds Review

"Tragedy.  Milk.  Revenge.  Killin’ Nat-zis.  The Bear Jew.  Hitler.  Wrath.  Hugo Stiglitz.  Sacrifice.  Schnapps.  Movie Premieres.  Mexican Standoffs.  Love.  Hate.  Knives.  Torture.  Strudel.  Sabotage.  Giant Burning Faces.  Art.  Revenge.  Destruction.  Dynamite.  Scotch.  Baseball bats.  B.J. Novak.  Deceit.  Death.  Feet.  Lust.  Winston Churchill.  Glory.  Hate.  Spies.  Scalping.  Arson.  Kidnapping.  Colonel Hans Landa.  Honor.  Machine Guns.  Treason.  Fear.  Rebellion.  Pain.  Revenge.  Quentin Tarantino has done it again!"

Superman/Batman: Public Enemies is a fun animated movie that will entertain children and adults alike.  In this film adaptation of the comic of the same name written by Jeph Loeb, we have an economic downturn, we have a modern, ever humble yet clever and quipping Superman, we have a huge meteor made of kryptonite speeding towards earth, and we have Lex Luthor being elected President of the United States.  This sets up a Watchmen-style world where superheroes are working for the American Government, “So they don’t work against me,” confides Luthor.  When Superman refuses to work for his long time enemy he and Batman, who shows up randomly, become wanted criminals. From this device we see all sorts of modern political commentary emerge on the nature of the power of authority, the use of manipulation and fear in the media, and the difference between what is “right” and what is the law, although, these issues are secondary to the action and plot, but what do you expect?

 

Before I get into the actual review, I want to make my position very clear: I LOVED the 1999 cult hit Boondock Saints.   I saw it on a recommendation and fell in love.  The action sequences were wildly fresh.  The story was engaging and original.  The acting was great, save a forgivable few mediocre performances.  The characters and dialogue were colorful, witty, and light.  The movie was so f---ing fun!

 

The Boondock Saints 2: All Saints Day is not fun. This movie is about the return of the McManus brothers (Sean Patrick Flanery and Norman Reedus) from a self-imposed exile in Ireland to once again roam the streets of Boston enforcing their own brand of justice.  The filmmakers tried to recreate the quick pace and slick style of Boondock the first but could manage only to get it up to the level of a shitty knockoff.  The action sequences are laughably repetitive and several are blatant rehashes of scenes from the first movie, with only minor differences. 

 

The script is ridden with transparent exposition, unreasonable plot advances, pointless callbacks to the first film, and masturbatory self-awareness gags as if to say, “We have legions of fans that care about a f---ing good story.”  This sequel is schizophrenic and celebratory, a stark contrast to the first film.

 

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