Robert J. Baden

Robert J. Baden (197)

New on the Tube is a series devoted to reviewing relatively new television shows and determining how they may (or may not) appeal to their intended audiences, where the shows are going, and what can be done to make them better.


Show Premise: 


Roberts & Roberts, an advertising agency headed up by a father and daughter team, is in dire straits as some of their clients begin dropping them. The unorthodox, out-of-the-box thinking of Simon Roberts envisions some interesting ideas for the agency, but the down-to-earth ways of his daughter Sydney clashes. Because of Simon’s known success for spectacular advertising events, Sydney tries to one-up her father in an effort to bring in big business, often with disastrous results. The show airs on Thursdays at 9:00 p.m. (Eastern) on CBS.

SPOILERS BELOW

New on the Tube is a series devoted to reviewing relatively new television shows and determining how they may (or may not) appeal to their intended audiences, where the shows are going, and what can be done to make them better.


Show Premise: 


Jason, the son of an explorer, seeks out his father’s remains and ends up transported to the fabled city of Atlantis, but in ancient times.  While trying to figure out how he got there, and what it has to do with his father’s death, Jason encounters two individuals who become unlikely friends in the face of some very unusual circumstances.  Unsure of what he’s going to do, Jason and his comrades make a living in Atlantis while trying to find his place in this new, but old, world.  The show airs on Saturdays at 8:20 p.m. (GMT) on BBC One.

SPOILERS BELOW

There were some glaringly huge plot problems and storytelling elements in the latest Star Trek film, including the fact that, despite his superb acting, Benedict Cumberbatch being cast to play a character of Indian descent was rather a slap in the face.  IDW Publishing, however, has gone out of its way to explain why the personification of Khan Noonian Singh is not what Trek fans thought it would be, delving into the past of the man who has become Kirk’s most ardent nemesis - a look into just what made this person into one of the bloodiest tyrants in human history, and how clever and intelligent he truly is.

SPOILERS BELOW

I’m not big on the whole zombie culture deal, even though I did enjoy some of the Resident Evil films and really liked Shaun of the Dead.  I’m not a horror fan, so it takes a lot to really interest me, and, normally anthologies are hard to grab my attention, too, but Dead Roots took quite a different approach than I had expected.  Several different stories by several different creative teams look at the zombie effect from many different points of view, and while they all have one overall theme, there are so many things that are different that it is truly seeing a vast array of unique and interesting stories.

SPOILERS BELOW

New on the Tube is a series devoted to reviewing relatively new television shows and determining how they may (or may not) appeal to their intended audiences, where the shows are going, and what can be done to make them better.


Show Premise: 


Based on the 1820 American folk story The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, the show focuses on a soldier with the Colonial Army who killed a Hessian mercenary in battle, but is mortally wounded as well and seemingly dies. He later awakens in modern-day Westchester County, New York, and investigates strange occurrences in the area with a somewhat skeptical police officer. The show airs on Mondays at 9:00 p.m. (Eastern) on FOX.

SPOILERS BELOW

I’m a bit of a huge fan of Trigun, as everyone can tell given my choice of profile avatar tends to be a headshot of Vash the Stampede, but all I’ve ever actually seen is the anime adaption.  So, when I found out that Dark Horse Comics was releasing the manga into an omnibus form, I decided I had to give it a read to see if the original was just as good.  And, I was most certainly not disappointed.

SPOILERS BELOW

I enjoy a good conspiracy theory as much as anyone who watched The X-Files back when it was really popular, and everyone knows just how much I like contemporary science fiction and fantasy adventures, but there are times when there is too much clichéd usage in the storytelling to make them truly favorable.  I want a story that will really hold my attention, keep it throughout the dissemination of information, right up until the climatic end, and I really, really don’t like things to be predictable.  I was excited to give this series a shot, but I’m fairly disappointed in a lot of what I’ve read.

SPOILERS BELOW

This is certainly a new series for me, and one that has a lot of graphic detail to it.  I didn’t know what to expect when I first picked it up, but I’ll say this much: it is most certainly intended for a more mature reading audience than I originally thought.  There’s a lot going on, and the details are very important to understand it all, but I am hooked in the sense of trying to figure out just what is going on . . . and so will you.

SPOILERS BELOW

I grew up with The Powerpuff Girls. They were one of my favorite cartoons at the time, and I loved the stylistic animation that was a cross between old-school cartoons and new-age sharp angles.  There was a point when I even read an online fan-made publication of the young-aged girls, so when I heard there was a chance to review a new, official comic about the terrific trio of sugar and spice, I jumped at the chance.  IDW has once again brought to life a licensed property that otherwise would have been stuck in fandom limbo.

SPOILERS BELOW

*Please note that this article is an opinion-editorial.


This past summer, the second rebooted Star Trek film came out, after much hype and speculation concerning the plot and characters of that feature.  As an ardent Trekkie, I was excited, especially given how the first film was able to tie in the already established timeline shown in the previous films and television shows without it being ludicrous, but I was unprepared for just how much of the classic, original aspects of former Star Trek continuity was taken for the plot.  It isn’t as though I’m against reusing previous plot points and characters in a rebooted fashion—DC’s done it for their New 52 reboot, though some of the success on that is still up for consideration—but the sheer amount of information recycled into the remade galaxy is staggering.  Into Darkness blatantly steals elements from four of the original Trek films, but not all of them are for the better.

MAJOR STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS SPOILERS BELOW

Page 3 of 15
Go to top