‘Creepy Scarlett #4:’ Comic Book Review (A Girl and Her Bear)

. . . then she swung her blade, as if her life (which it did) depended on it. Vincent used his resources to more than their abilities. He commanded . . . Apologies. It just struck me that some of you have not been introduced to Creepy Scarlett or the graphic novel that borrows her name. Let's give you a quick recap, if you haven't yet been introduced.

Anyone familiar with a Street named Sesame may well be aware of a resident who craves cookies. Craves them more than heroine addicts yearn for the needle and the spoon. Well, lemme tell you a bit about candy. Although "candy" can be used as a street term for dope, Scarlett is always on the prowl for her next fix. Well, she isn't that big of an addict, but she certainly is fond of it, almost as fond as she is for her one-eyed teddy bear Ted. How she got to the church where she lives or what she does there remains a secret to this point, so there's no light I can shed there, friendly neighbor. Just as I cannot explain why there is a tombstone above an empty grave that actually has the name "Creepy Scarlett," etched into the edifice.

The story, thus far, has a very "power thrust upon them" feeling. Like a certain Sunnydale teen you may recall, who was torn from Heaven to endure responsibilities that she thought she'd found peace from, our Scarlett (who "lives" not far from a town called Sunnyville) was also drawn back from death's embrace to carry on the mantle of guardian. She is to be the one that guards "The Emerald of Lucifer." Said to have fallen from his crown as he was cast from Heaven, the stone bestows great power to its possessor. Hence a trainer (or in the Buffyverse, "Watcher") shows up to give her the emerald, the knowledge of how it came to his possession, and educate her in the skills to fend off those who would take the stone from her, out of the sacred land and church where she dwells. A bit annoyed by the training, but with a promise of candy, she decides to make a go of it. She only has memory from a certain point on, she has an innate physical prowess, but also a naivete that reminds of another Whedon creation, one named River Tam.

Skipping ahead a few explanatory bits and pieces, characters making ingress and egress, information gained by torture or temptation, we come to Creepy Scarlett #4. It may or may not surprise you to find our heroine, at this point in time, locked in a cage with what some may call "freaks." Her beloved Ted being held captive by her evil uncle Vincent, a tactic he would soon regret, specifically when he has minion, Jack (complete with pumpkin face). separate Ted's ragamuffin head from the rest of the silly, old bear with a quick and thorough slice. An action immediately regretted. Hidden inside was the Emerald of Lucifer, which landed on the "Scarlett" side of the holding cell gate. Like any modern, cartoon fan knows (although this tale currently takes place in 1919, so how would she know?), when you want to hide or dispose of something, what do you do? You swallow it, of course, and that's just what she does. At this point, Scarlett pulls a "Jean Grey to Phoenix" transformation and goes on a bit of a darker disposition. Backs are stabbed, alliances broken, and that's not all, but it's what you get for now.

Of all four issues available, #4 is certainly the most violent. Provided that our leading lady had just swallowed something with "of Lucifer" in the name, it's understandable that things take a turn, for better or worse, depending on your point of view. With multiple battles and a variety of villains, if you're just looking for some decent fight scenes, then by all means, check out Issue #4. As for the rest of the series, it comes off with too much a sense of familiarity, a pastiche of stories you've already seen or heard. Creepy Scarlett has a chance to pick up, but, at the moment, it comes off hackneyed. This one's on you. Do some more research and vibe it out or flip a coin and call it in the air.

You can thank me later.

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