Jason Enright

Jason Enright (135)

Favorite Superhero: Cyclops
Favorite Animal: Anklyosaurus
Favorite Game: Pathfinder RPG

 

The Massive 3In The Massive #3, Brian Wood asks the reader, what is the mission of a world-saving environmentalist group after the world has ended? This is a big story told in a very small, personal way. Wood intercuts splash pages showing the various disasters that have befallen the world with the story of a ship full of environmentalists who think that just because the world is ending, it doesn't mean that their mission is over. In fact, it may just be the beginning.

 

WizzywigWizzywig is an in-depth look at the incredible life of a computer hacker that draws readers in with its wonderfully thoughtout characters and deceptively simple art. Ed Piskor has crafted an engaging tale that asks big questions about government, security, and the role technology plays in our lives, but in the end is really about two best friends who refuse to give up. The book is massive for a graphic novel, clocking at almost 300 pages, but with the use of dynamic layouts, incredible art, and great character work, Piskor makes sure the book is a delightful read from cover to cover.

 

To Read ListThe To Read List:

Moriarty: the Dark Chamber by Daniel Corey, Anthony Diecidue, Perry Freeze, and Dave Lanphear
Umbrella Academy: Apocalypse Suite by Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba
The Light by Nathan Edmondson and Brett Weldele
Lost Dogs by Jeff Lemire
The Underwater Welder by Jeff Lemire
Skullkickers Vol. 1 & 2 by Jim Zub, Edwin Huang, and Misty Coats

Hawkeye 1Fanboy Comics Contributor Jason Enright brings you his top comic book picks for the week.

 



Hawkeye #1
by Matt Fraction, David Aja, and Matt Hollingsworth


This is a perfect Issue #1. First off it's a completely stand-alone story. Fraction doesn't try to hook you into reading Issue #2, it is like he says, "I'm going to tell a great story, and if you like it, you'll be back." Second, it's a wonderful mix of humor, action, and drama. Third, it is a great introduction to the title character. Fraction really does a great job defining what kind of hero Hawkeye is. Even better, he doesn't suit up as Hawkeye in this issue. He saves the day as Clint Barton. Clint is incredibly likeable. He's funny and he fights the good fight in his own unique way. Also, David Aja and Matt Hollingsworth deliver really cool art. Their style is simple, yet incredibly expressive. Buy this book, you'll like it, and even if you don't end up adding it to your pull list, oh well. You still got a really good story about Hawkeye for $2.99, and that's something you can't say everyday.

 

Higher Earth 3Who doesn't love futuristic sci-fi, where the heroes travel from world to world fighting dinosaurs and bounty hunters? Sam Humphries delivers another awesome issue of his action-packed sci-fi series, Higher Earth. Humphries has rocketed to stardom as a top writer at several of the major publishers since the debut of his Image book, Our Love is Real, and he deserves all of the praise he gets, as he is one fantastic writer. He somehow manages to build this awesome new multiverse filled with incredible characters while keeping the book moving at a brisk pace and never shying away from intense, bloody action.

 

Mind the Gap 3Jim McCann used to work in soap operas, and he told me once in an interview that comics, even superhero comics, are just soap operas with more action. He went on to give examples of how many long-lost twins and comas and bouts of amnesia could be found in both comics and soap operas. Well, it looks like Jim has finally made a true soap opera comic in Mind the Gap, and it is awesome. Like a soap opera, Mind the Gap has a big cast of characters who all have their own secret motives and dark secrets. Unlike a soap opera, Mind the Gap has extraordinary elements like an entire world that takes place in the psyche of coma patients. Yeah, you read that right, this book is trippy.

 

Harvest 1Harvest is a gritty look at the grimy underworld of blackmarket surgery and organ transplants. A.J. Lieberman spins an interesting tale about a doctor's fall from grace and the criminals who take him in to make use of his unique skill set. The book is filled with all of the drugs, violence, and language that you expect out of a dark crime book, but with its crisp dialogue and very believable characters, it reaches beyond its genre to be a unique thriller with plenty of intense drama in store for the reader. Colin Lorimer's art is fantastic. He uses clean lines that give his characters a very realistic feel, and then colors over them with thick, dark colors adding a very film noir feel to the book. This especially makes the color pop when he adds a bloody red to the scene.

To Read ListThe To Read List:

A Tale of Sand by Ramón K. Pérez
Moriarty: the Dark Chamber by Daniel Corey, Anthony Diecidue, Perry Freeze, and Dave Lanphear
Umbrella Academy: Apocalypse Suite by Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba
The Light by Nathan Edmondson and Brett Weldele
Lost Dogs by Jeff Lemire
The Underwater Welder by Jeff Lemire
Skullkickers Vol. 1 & 2 by Jim Zub, Edwin Huang, and Misty Coats
Siegfried by Alex Alice

Debris 1Fanboy Comics Contributor Jason Enright brings you his top comic book picks for the week.

 

Debris #1
by Kurtis J. Wiebe and Riley Rossmo

Image gives us another great new series with Debris. In this series, Wiebe and Rossmo tell the tale of Maya, a young warrior protecting the last remnants of humanity on a world covered with trash where spirits animate the debris into giant monsters. This book has a simple but effective art style that allows Rossmo to deliver strong emotion on one page and intense action on the next. Wiebe does a nice job balancing the action with the exposition needed to set up his new world. Even cooler, his awesome female action hero really lets loose and kicks some serious butt, which is always nice to see. If you like a good mix of sci-fi and fantasy with a fully clothed female protagonist (gasp!), then check out Debris!

 

Dragon AgeThe Dragon Age video games have become known for their intricate plot lines and intriguing characters, and the new graphic novel from Dark Horse brings the best aspects of the video game to the printed page. Gaider and Freed weave an interesting tale that spins out of the previous video games without relying on them too much.

Page 7 of 10
Go to top