Drew Siragusa

Drew Siragusa (65)

Favorite Movie: Metropolis
Favorite Comic Book: The Ultimates
Favorite Video Game: The Legend of Zelda

 

SW Boba Fett 4The conclusion to Star Wars: Blood Ties—Boba Fett is Dead is here.  In the interest of not spoiling the ending for anyone, this review will be kept short.

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

 

Boba Fett Dead 2The adventures of the greatest intergalactic bounty hunter continue in Star Wars: Blood Ties - Boba Fett is Dead #2.  A discerning eye will notice that, since this story takes place shortly before A New Hope, it is quite obvious that Boba Fett is, indeed, not dead.  We were left with many questions after last issue—the greatest being how could he have survived a blaster shot to the head?  Thankfully, we get the answer in this issue; however, by the end we are still left with more questions.

 

SW - Blood Ties 1Before I begin with my review, I feel the need to share a little bit about myself.  Boba Fett has always been my favorite thing about Star Wars.  When I was growing up and kids argued over who got to play Han Solo, I always called dibs on Boba Fett and even dressed up as the Mandalorian for multiple Halloweens.


Being the fan that I am, I was very excited when it was announced that there would be a sequel to the mini-series Star Wars: Blood Ties.  For those of you who have not read the original one, I strongly recommend you pick it up (as well as another miniseries called Jango Fett: Open Season); however, I will give you a quick synopsis to catch you up.

SPOILERS BELOW

Everyone has a favorite music album that will always hold a special place in his or her heart.  Just think back to that first time you heard yours.  No, seriously. Think about the first time you heard that album.  I will wait…

 

It was all new.  Even if it was a band you were familiar with, there was something different that really struck a chord with you.  Don’t you wish that you could reclaim that experience - even just once?

 

My personal favorite album happens to be Green Day’s American Idiot, and, recently, I was able to re-experience it in a whole new way.  For those of you who are unaware of the album, it is a rock opera that tells the story of Jesus of Suburbia as he embarks on a journey of self-discovery.

Invincible #68 just came out, and boy is it great.  Robert Kirkman’s Invincible is, by far, the best comic series currently running.

 

For those of you unaware of Invincible, here is a quick recap:  Mark Grayson is your typical, teenage boy dealing with all of the usual problems including school, girls, and growing up.  That is where the normalcy ends.  His father is Omni-Man, an alien who came to Earth and became its greatest hero.  The series started just before Mark’s own powers began manifesting.

 

The series is notorious for being a pastiche of iconic comic book characters and playing with the usual conventions of the medium.  Omni-Man is an obvious nod towards Superman, and his team of superheroes strikes a strong resemblance to the Justice League.

I hear that when work began on The Prisoner, the intention was not to remake the original, but rather to re-imagine it.  I think they have succeeded in doing just that.

 

I know that many may consider this heresy, but I actually liked the new iteration of The Prisoner better than the original.  Having not actually experienced the '60s, I felt that I could relate much better to the new one.  That is to say that I am not denouncing the original; I still find it incredibly brilliant.

 

Movie sequels are rarely good, especially ones that have a decade or more gap between them.  Luckily, Tron: Legacy was able to break free from this stigma and was one of the few good movies in a mostly lackluster year of film.

When watching the movie, I remembered the wonder and awe that used to come from experiencing a Disney movie and, for a moment, forgot what an evil corporation it was.

The movie is far from perfect, but extremely enjoyable.  The story moved slowly at times, but I found this refreshing, as most movies these days try to shove far too many side plots and superfluous scenes in just to make it more fast-paced.

I already had my review for this week picked out, but then something so momentous happened that I needed to write about it, instead.  One of the best shows currently on television had a crossover with my favorite show of all-time.  I am speaking, of course, about this past week’s episode of The Office.

For several years now, there have been rumors about a possible cameo or two by characters from the original BBC version of The Office.  So many promises have been made that, when I heard that Ricky Gervais might be reprising his role as David Brent, I had dismissed it as just another false rumor.

Well, I was wrong, because this week Steve Carell’s Michael Scott met David Brent in a chance encounter.  It was short but sweet, and it was worth the wait.

If you and I have ever shared a discussion about music, then you are probably aware of my admiration of Ben Folds (or maybe you just saw the signed poster of him giving the double deuce on my bedroom wall).  The man is incredibly talented, and he is constantly surprising people by doing the opposite of what everyone expects—be it ironically naming his band Ben Folds Five (despite being a trio), judging “The Sing-Off,” or covering Dr. Dre’s “Bitches Ain’t Shit.”

Despite knowing about his proclivity for eccentricity, I was still worried when he announced that he would not be writing the lyrics for his latest album, Lonely Avenue.  Instead, he would be putting music to poems written by Nick Hornby.  High Fidelity was great and all, but I was unsure about how Hornby’s lyrics would fit with Folds’ music.  Part of me worried that this album might be that bastard child that no one really likes to talk about. (I am looking at you, Weezer; Make Believe was awful.)

But, you know what, I was pleasantly surprised.  The lyrics on this album felt just as personal and heartfelt as on Folds’ previous albums.  There is more of a bitter sting to the songs.  Not that this is anything new to Folds’ music, but it does feel like it comes from other inspirations, and I think that it has helped him to grow as a musician.

Of course, I had to buy the deluxe edition of the CD, because I am that kind of nerd.  (The deluxe edition of Ben Folds’ previous album, Way To Normal, was how I obtained the aforementioned poster.)  It came with a book containing four short stories by Nick Hornby.  I enjoyed the book quite thoroughly, and it gave me a better appreciation of him as a writer.

As a final note, I would like Ben Folds and Nick Hornby to know one thing:  Some guy on the net thinks you do not suck and he should know; he’s got his own blog.

Page 5 of 5
Go to top