Claire Thorne

Claire Thorne

Favorite Book: The Lord of the Rings
Favorite Apocalypse: The Stand . . . no, The Walking Dead . . . no, The Road . . . no, definitely The Stand.
Favorite Soundtrack for the Apocalypse: Anything by Tom Waits

Get ready, because I’m getting ready to totally spoil everything that happens in the first five minutes of the series premiere of Colony, USA Network’s new alien-occupation dystopian series set in a near-future Los Angeles.

I have read Calvin and Hobbes practically every day for as long as I can remember.  Once the books starting rolling off the presses, I spent endless hours immersed in Snow Goons and Calvinball, exploring with Spaceman Spiff and hiding from the trustworthy monsters under the bed.

If I were able to craft my own degree in Geek Studies, I would load up on graduate-level classes about Hobbits and vampire slayers and post-apocalyptic survival.  I’d study superheroes and villains, monsters and robots, old worlds and new technologies.  Thankfully, there’s not much need to be hypothetical about the opportunity to study these topics.  There are legions of curious geeks just like me out there crafting opinions, analyzing themes, and bringing scholarly criticism to the wide universe that is popular culture media.

Trine Hampstead knows everything.  I’m not saying she “thinks” she knows everything.  I’m not even saying she acts like she does, driving everyone around her crazy with her “know-it-all” attitude and inability to keep her opinions to herself.

I love zombies of all forms, slow, fast, sentient, drooling, and falling apart.  And, I am an ever-loyal Marshmallow (Veronica Mars uber-fan).  So, zombies written by Rob Thomas?  Yes, please!!

Step back in time with me to an era of John Wayne swagger, might makes right, and brawn over brains, when that indomitable American get-it-done attitude was all it took to overcome any situation. 

Robert Capa famously said, If your pictures arent good enough, youre not close enough.  In the profession of photojournalism, this adage frequently sends brave men and women into the thick of armed conflict.  It sent Robert Capa onto Omaha Beach during the Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, where he captured one of the most iconic photographs of World War II.

There is a featurette on the Gotham: Season One DVD called “Fractured Villains of Gotham.”  This word, “fractured,” turns out to be an accurate description of almost every aspect of the show, both in front of and behind the camera.  It is this schizophrenic nature that informs both its strengths and its weaknesses.

Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá, twin brothers and award-winning comic book writers and artists, bring us a riveting retelling of renowned Brazilian author Milton Hatoum’s novel, The Brothers. Moon and Bá’s Eisner and Harvey Award-winning reputations precede them with Daytripper, The Umbrella Academy, and a variety of additional titles for Dark Horse and Image Comics under their joint (and separate) belts.

It’s Halloween in Gotham, and there’s been a breakout at Arkham Asylum. I think the Gotham news agencies can just go ahead and save that headline for use every Halloween . . . and most every other day, as well. This particular breakout involves Silver Banshee and Solomon Grundy, who immediately take to the streets to wreak . . . yep, you guessed it . . . mayhem. It soon becomes clear, however, that these two have been set free with a purpose in mind, and it comes as little shock (SLIGHT SPOILER, but only if you’ve never seen any kind of Batman anything ever) that someone whose name rhymes with “The Croaker” is orchestrating things from behind the scenes.

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