Print this page

‘Mass Effect: Foundation #1’ - Advance Comic Book Review

As you may have guessed, my real name isn’t Jack.  Because of the sensitivity of my career, etc., I use the moniker, “Jack” or “Simply Jack” to throw the hounds (you) off my trail.  Jack, however, is partially inspired by a supporting character in the Mass Effect franchise . . . so yeah – I am a total Mass Effect junky.  And, Jack is hot, and a girl. (and now you don’t even know if I’m a boy or a girl!  Bwahahah!)

Anyway, now that you know I’m a fan, on to the review.  Mass Effect: Foundation (a 13-part series published by Dark Horse) takes place way before the video games actually occur.  Basically, humanity is all sci-fi and stuff, but kind of nascent to the new technology.  Mankind has just won its “First Contact War.”  Also, the Shadow Broker, Cerebrus, and Barla Von are all players – for those nerds like me out there who know what these names actually mean.  What am I saying?  If this is your first crack at Mass Effect, you have to be confused.  I recommend playing Mass Effect 1, 2, and 3 to get the true feel of this ginourmous universe.  But, do you all get my point?  It’s a big/complex universe, and this could be a steep learning curve for you newbies.  Be patient . . . and let the opiate that is Mass Effect slowly convert you into a Mass Effect zombie like me. 

So, the writers of the comic, Mac Walters and Omar Francia, are probably the ligers (like, the coolest animals ever) of Mass Effect comics.  Mac is the lead writer for the Mass Effect video games, so he is both loved and hated by fans around the world.  I love him, although he did hurt me a little at the end of Mass Effect 3.  Omar has illustrated heaps of ME comics, and is also known for his Star Wars (and myriad of other) work.  His art is clean, and actually feels like a brand; all ME comics tend to have the same look.  I take comfort in this.  You should, too.

The first comic in this 13-part series doesn’t show much of what is to come. It’s a prelude to the actual story, and introduces our new heroine (anti-heroine?) as a slave child who quickly makes the acquaintance of a bada-- freedom fighter cum assassin cum terrorist or something.  The kid faces a quandary, stuff goes down, and fast-forward to adulthood and the opening act of the series . . . which starts in comic #2.

Bottom line: most of you already have decided to buy this comic based on your prior history with ME.   If you’re on the fence, I recommend the entire franchise 100% - it’s amazing.  This comic will be, too . . . but the first comic is just a teaser. 

Hugs 'n kisses,

Jack