'Lobster Johnson Volume 2: The Burning Hand' - Advance TPB Review

 

Lobster Johnson V2I have been a big fan of Lobster Johnson since I first saw him. In fact, I generally won’t shut up about my incredible love for Lobster Johnson. Part of this stems from my enjoyment of Mike Mignola’s sense of humor, but part of my love of the Lobster stems from his pedigree. Lobster Johnson is one part Indiana Jones, one part Batman (admittedly a small part), and one part Dick Tracey. He is as likely to fall into a trap as he is to spring one. He has the best (worst) catchphrase ever: “Feel the Claw!” In fact, nearly everything that he says feels like a line from a 1930s pulp adventure. Seriously, Lobster Johnson is the best.

So, how’s the new trade? Am I capable of delivering an impartial review? What’s with all the questions? Great. Mostly. I have no idea.


The main attraction to this story is the blend of humor, horror, and adventure. The story delivers all of these in spades. It starts when ghostly Indians attack New York in 1932. From there, the story gets weirder. I won’t go into specifics, but we are treated to a nice detective story with humor and supernatural elements. Just trust me, this book is a treat.

The art is pitch-perfect, evoking the 1930s that we all remember from the movies, as well as the monsters and mobsters that stalked them. What makes the art so great is that it seems to love the setting and resist the temptation to wink too much.

Honestly, I have always been a fan of Mike Mignola’s work, but Lobster Johnson might be my favorite. This book delivers all the humor and action that you wanted and didn’t get from the Indiana Jones fanfic, Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. I loved this book, and I think you will, too.


Five Ghostly Glowing Indians Invading New York out of Five.

 

 

Last modified on Friday, 21 June 2013 01:34

Ben Rhodes, Fanbase Press Senior Contributor

Favorite Book:  Cryptonomicon
Favorite MovieYoung Frankenstein
Favorite Absolutely Everything:  Monty Python

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