Jack ReacherGeeks are weird when it comes to casting.  When a property we like gets optioned into a filmed medium like movies or television, we can’t help but add our two cents for casting our beloved character.  Often, our casting choices offer little insight into who would be the right actor for the role.  We usually just go for lookalikes.  Left up to us, Hugh Jackman would have likely never been cast as Wolverine.  He’s completely wrong for the role physically, and many in our community would blanche at Jackman’s background in musical theater as inappropriate background to capture Logan’s essence.  “The guy who plays Wolverine should be an MMA fighter, not a song and dance man!” would be the approximate sentiment.  And, we would have been totally wrong.  At this stage in the game, with four movies produced, a fifth one currently filming, and Days of Future Past on the horizon, Hugh Jackman simply is Wolverine.


Fans of Lee Child’s series of books featuring ex-military police investigator Jack Reacher had a similar reaction when a film based on those novels was announced.  If you’re not familiar with the books, Reacher is described as 6’ 5” and 250 pounds with blond hair and blue eyes.  Reacher is a bada-- brute (he’s gone through extensive Army Ranger training), but he’s a brilliant investigator and usually the smartest guy in the room.  He’s Sherlock Holmes crossed with a silverback gorilla.

 

SW A Sunny Day in the VoidI'm not even going to ask, because I already know the answer. You all missed me, I get it. It's been a few weeks without your old buddy Sean and his Clone Wars ramblings, and I'm sure you've all been wondering where the heck I've been!

Oh, you weren't? Well, alright then. Let's carry on, shall we?

 

ChadhiyanaChadhiyana is a mythological story about a warrior woman in the ancient Middle East, where she travels from town to town, saving people and battling monsters. You know, the usual.


Chadhiyana captures the feeling of an uncovered legend perfectly. Everything from the art style to the writing made me think of Greek myths and tales like Beowulf. The writing avoids the usual trick of having a narrator, but the characters achieve that same style of a bard through their dialogue, describing everything in flowery language and explaining the history behind things, which perfectly matched the tone without crowding the pages. This introductory piece is divided into two separate stories that are more snapshots than full tales, but they do a great job of showing what's cool about the character and even manage to slip in some hooks about some of her other adventures that I'm dying to learn about.

BW Dr. M 3The comic book event of the summer is nigh!  Before Watchmen, the much-anticipated prequel series to Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' Watchmen, will consist of seven limited series and an epilogue one-shot.  Stay tuned, as the Fanboy Comics crew will be reviewing each title as it is released. Hurm. 

 

 

The story continues to unfold concerning the background of Jon Osterman, but my faith in the storytelling of J. Michael Straczynski has continued to fall beyond the faith that I’ve put into him over the years.  I was hoping that my inability to get into Rising Stars was a fluke, given how much I’ve enjoyed his other work and how big of a Babylon 5 fan I’ve been over the years, but this issue just confirms how little of his recent writing abilities I have liked.  There was a saving grace, however, in that we learn more about Osterman’s life, in a very interesting fashion—at least from a historical point of view (says the historian).  With only one more issue to go, will JMS be able to bring me back into the fold?  I kind of doubt it, but I have some hope.



MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

Skin Crawling ComicsThe following is an interview with Rachel Pandich, comic book writer and creator of Skin Crawling Comics, a new horror-themed comic book anthology to be released in October 2013.  In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Pandich about the impetus for the scary story collection, her previous experience in working with anthologies like Womanthology: Heroic, and what horror fans can expect from the independently created book.

This interview was conducted on November 27, 2012.

 

 

Declan and Chang Sweet FA Issue Number 1 coverBlatant violence doesn’t always grab my interest, and when it is involved, there has to be a hook that will keep me coming back for more. And, that’s what this comic did. At first, I wasn’t sure what to make of it, and I didn’t think I was going to like it much, but the first issue ended with such a cliffhanger that I just had to find out what happened next. And then, at the end of the second issue, my interest was still piqued. I’m still not sure what to make of it overall, as gratuitous violence and profanity don’t always hold my interest, but I’m more than willing to find out, and I hope others are, too.

SPOILERS BELOW

Skin Crawling ComicsPRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact:
Rachel Pandich
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'SKIN CRAWLING COMICS' HORROR ANTHOLOGY IN PRODUCTION

 


JACKSONVILLE, FL – December 12, 2012 – Indie comic book writer Rachel Pandich (Womanthology: Heroic, Aspire) is proud to announce the development of her horror-themed comic book anthology, Skin Crawling Comics

Written by an assortment of up-and-coming writers including Pandich, Paul Chapman (Porn Gnomes and Other Strange Tales), Bryant Dillon (Something Animal, Identity Thief), and Jody Houser (Womathology: Space, Dead Roots), the collection will consist of terrifyingly creepy comics that span the horror spectrum.  The stories will feature artwork by talented creators including Ashley Lanni Hoye (Aspire), James Greene (Studio YOLO), Kate Carleton (Solestar, Womanthology Sketchbook), Laura Bearl (Free Candy and the UCCS 2010 Senior Art Exhibition), and Chris Thorne (The 36)!

 

Borderlands 2Funny, action-packed, and silly as hell, Borderlands: Origins captures the spirit of the video game in comic form to tell the origin stories for the four main characters from the original Borderlands, leading up to the moment when they boarded Marcus' bus. Issue #1 told Roland's story, and in Issue #2, we move on to Lilith.

 

Change 1Change is an odd bird, and by no means a simple book. Reading it gave me flashbacks to the kind of stuff I read a lot of as an English major, stuff that I knew as I was going through it that I didn't quite get. But, Change is enjoyable enough even if you don't quite get it yet. There are plot and character up front, so that the visual non sequitirs don't derail the uninitiated.

 

Comic Guide to BRewingQuick, what’s the difference between a macchiato and a latte? Not sure? Would you expect an amateur investigative reporter / superhero sidekick to set you straight? That’s exactly what happens in these coffee centric spin-offs to Tales of the Night Watchman.


T.O.T.N.W.M.
(pronounced either “Tott-nee-wim” or “Tote-new-em”) is the creation of writer Dave Kelly and artist Lara Antal.  You can read Fanboy Comics’ review of issue one here.  It tells the story of Nora Cashin, a barista blogger who becomes roommates with Charlie Maxwell, her co-worker.  While Nora really wants to be an investigative journalist, it is Charlie who currently fights crime as The Night Watchman, a detective specter from the 1940s who inhabits his body.   

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