The End. A Web Series.

The robots have taken over and there are only a few survivors left.
(The End. is a post-apocalyptic buddy comedy.)


Catch a new episode on the Fanboy Comics website every Friday!

 

Starring: Bryan Mayer and Justinh Avery

Directed by Peter Harmon

Written by Bryan Mayer

Director of Photography: Rick Bickerstaff

Edited by Jason Marsh

Sound Design and Sound Editing by Ian Becker

Produced by Bryan Mayer

Co-Produced by Justinh Avery, Peter Harmon, Ian Becker, Rick Bickerstaff, and Jason Marsh

 

Dear Fanboy Comics Readers:

 

On behalf of the staff at Fanboy Comics, I am very happy to announce that The 36, a five-part graphic novel created by Kristopher White, reached its fundraising goal on Kickstarter and is currently going into production!  Earlier this summer, I interviewed White regarding the project, and I can assure you that this is a graphic novel series that is not to be missed!

 

Congratulations to Kristopher White (Creator and Writer), George Zapata (Pencils and Ink), and Micki Zurcher (Color) on reaching their goal, and I wish them the best as they continue with The 36!

 

Hobo with a Shotgun: A Film Review

More a tone poem than a movie, this thoughtful, vibrant film takes the audience on the placid, yet emotionally vibrant, journey of a Hobo with a Shotgun.  Actually, this movie IS a pretty incredible B-Movie along the lines of Robert Rodriguez’ Machete.  Coming from the exploitation camp, it has a similar genesis, starting as a fake trailer and winning first prize in Rodriguez’ South by Southwest Grindhouse trailers contest.  After accompanying select screenings of the Tarantino/Rodriguez Grindhouse double feature, it was then expanded into a feature length movie directed by Jason Eisener, written by John Davies, and starring Rutger Hauer in the title role.  Also, like Machete, this movie will not be for everyone, as it capitalizes on the gratuitous use of violence, vulgarity, and nudity, even reveling in it, as it pays homage to exploitation flicks of the past.  

What if Willy Wonka created video games and was obsessed with the 80s? That seems to be the question asked by Ernest Cline’s first novel, Ready Player One. In this novel, James Halliday, creator of the most popular video game in the world, the OASIS, has died with no heirs. Rather than allow the company to be broken up or sold, Halliday created a contest within the virtual reality of the OASIS, with the winner becoming sole heir to Halliday’s billions of dollars and the most successful video game company in history. This contest takes the form of an easter egg hunt, with the participants, known as gunters (short for egg hunters), searching for puzzles within the simulation. After a brief and entertaining exposition (ed. Like this one?), our story picks up with a gunter named Wade Watts, better known by his online handle, Parzival, five years after Halliday’s death. No one has beaten the contest; in fact, no one has found the first piece of the puzzle. Parzival and a small group of friends (if not quite allies) each try to outwit each other and stay ahead of the evil corporation, IOI, an oligarchical media company, which aims to win Halliday’s hunt by any means necessary.

 

Batman of Suburbia, A Web Series.

Batman is about to take on his biggest challenge yet... Suburbia.



Episode #6
Batman takes on his first villains and hits up a nightclub.



Starring: Doug Bass as Batman of Suburbia

Written, Directed, and Edited by: Doug Bass

Produced by: Barbra (Pakler) Dillon

Executive Produced by: Doug Bass, Bryant Dillon, Jorge Jazan, Jeff Larson, and Tony Newsom

Cinematography by: Jeff Larson

Sound and Mixing by: Jeremy Azevedo


Catch a new episode of Batman of Suburbia on the Fanboy Comics website every Tuesday!


UPDATE: CONTEST WINNER ANNOUNCED, BELOW!!!

 

Dear Fanboy Comics Readers:

 

What is best in life?

To crush your enemies, to see them driven before you, and to hear that Fanboy Comics is having a flippin’ sweet Conan the Barbarian giveaway!

In celebration of the release of the new Conan the Barbarian film from Lionsgate, Fanboy Comics invites you to try your hand at winning a Cimmerian king’s ransom of Conan items, including a wicked Conan t-shirt, Conan temporary tattoos, an official Conan movie poster, and a signed movie poster by Conan baddie, Rose McGowan!  So, now’s the time to ask Crom to grant you this one request! And, if he does not listen, than to HELL with him!

 

August 12, 2011

 

The Staff of Fanboy Comics would like to wish you and yours a very happy IBM PC Day!  Whether you are a Mac or a PC, it is only right to pay your respects on the day that the first available IBM Personal Computer was announced to the world.

 

On this day in 1981, a very excited set of computer strategists announced the IBM Personal Computer to a press conference at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City.  With a price tag of $1,565, the new IBM PC could process information faster than any earlier PCs and could connect to the home TV set, play games, and process text.  Thankfully, the cost of a personal computer has decreased a bit over the years!

 

The End. A Web Series.

The robots have taken over and there are only a few survivors left.
(The End. is a post-apocalyptic buddy comedy.)


Catch a new episode on the Fanboy Comics website every Friday!

 

Starring: Bryan Mayer and Justinh Avery

Directed by Peter Harmon

Written by Bryan Mayer

Director of Photography: Rick Bickerstaff

Edited by Jason Marsh

Sound Design and Sound Editing by Ian Becker

Produced by Bryan Mayer

Co-Produced by Justinh Avery, Peter Harmon, Ian Becker, Rick Bickerstaff, and Jason Marsh

 

What I remember from the opening moments of Drive: wide shots of glittery Los Angeles taken in the black of night, opening credits scribbled in thick pink font, electronic pop music that sounded like it could belong in a Brett Easton Ellis novel, and the feeling that I was about to witness an auteur’s breakout American film. I was not disappointed. Danish filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn (Bronson) took home the “Best Director” award from this year’s Cannes Film Festival for Drive, an invigorating, raw crime thriller with a loaded cast, including Ryan Gosling, Carey Mulligan, and Bryan Cranston. The beauty of this film, as a whole, is that it is purely the vision of its director, and it does not appear to be related, in any way, to the monotonous cookie cutter films that Hollywood can churn out by the dozen. Although Drive has its flaws, it is a work of art, a film that can actually be digested and dissected, scene-by-scene, with moments that are exhilarating, shockingly elegant, and beautifully brutal.

In the past few years, we have been given two reinterpretations of Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous character. The first, by Guy Ritchie, was a modern retelling of Sherlock Holmes in the Victorian Era. The second, by Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss, was a sort of classic BBC detective series set in modern times. Each of these versions approached the problem of introducing a Victorian hero to a modern audience, but they approached the issue in completely different ways.

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