Batman #1 Review

I have two words to say about Batman #1.  But, before I tell you what those two words are, I’m going to throw a lot more words your way to explain why those two words apply (or, you could just skip to the last sentence of this review... slacker).  

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

If someone ever told me that I’d be reading a comic written by a cast member of MTV’s The Real World, I think I might have slapped them. If someone ever told me that I’d be reading a comic written by a cast member of MTV’s The Real World, and that I would f---ing love it, I probably would’ve slapped myself. Well, comic book-sniffers, my cheek is red, my hand hurts, and so does my face, but, damn, did I love Judd Winick’s Catwoman book. Let me fill you in on why this DCnU issue #1 is the cat’s meow!

SPOILERS BELOW

Dear Fanboy Comics Readers:

On behalf of Fanboy Comics, I am both excited and proud to announce the addition of three new staff members to the FBC fold.  Joining the staff will be Rebecca Lear, Ben Rhodes, and Drew Siragusa, all of whom have provided countless hours of their services and support to make Fanboy Comics as geeky as it is.

September 22

 

Dear Fanboy Comics Readers:

 

Greetings from the Shire on this happiest of Hobbit Days!  Hobbit Day is the birthday of the hobbits Bilbo and Frodo Baggins, two fictional characters in J. R. R. Tolkien's popular set of books, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.  In the books both Bilbo and Frodo were said to be born on September 22, but of different years. Bilbo was born in the year of 2890 and Frodo in the year of 2968 in the Third Age (1290 and 1368 respectively in Shire-Reckoning.)

 

Terri is a story about an overweight fifteen-year-old of the same name (played by Jacob Wysocki) who doesn’t fit in at school. That may sound like many other teen coming-of-age films—Super Bad comes to mind—but there are key differences between Terri and other movies about not-so-attractive loners on the outskirts of social acceptance.  The differences are in the writing, style, and tone of this film. Without bells and whistles, Terri, directed by Azazel Jacobs, is remarkably realistic and honest in its portrayal of teenage life.

Storm Born: Issue #3 Review

Well, I finally got my hands on the 3rd issue of Richelle Mead and Grant Alter’s Storm Born series, and I just devoured it.  In this installment we follow freelance shaman Eugenie Markham, known also as Odile, into the dangerous Otherworld, as she attempts to find and rescue kidnapped Jasmine Delaney from the fairy-like beings called the Gentry.  To do this, Eugenie has to cross into the Otherworld with her own physical body, rather than doing it psychically.  This presents an extra danger for Markham, so she enlists the help of her fiends/enslaved and cursed souls who are forced to do what she says.  Volusian, a demon-looking soul who is “about as damned as a soul could be,” has a love-hate relationship with Eugenie, except without the love part.  He is enslaved to her and bound to protect her, but he makes no secret of his disdain.  We meet another soul, less a slave and more an indentured servant, named Nandi.  Nandi is a tormented soul cursed to roam the earth in endless suffering, but has agreed to serve Markham for three years in return for peace.  Finn is the final member of the entourage who is a fun, pixie-looking being with a big mouth, who mainly just hangs around because he thinks it’s fun.  And, together they head off into the Otherworld to find this missing girl.  

The following is an interview with Sam Cushion, composer of several unofficial fan scores based on The Hunger Games book trilogy.  Cushion has already scored the first two books with Music of Panem: Beginning of a Rebellion Part I and Music of Panem: Beginning of a Rebellion Part II and will soon be releasing his score for the third book, Music of Panem Part III: The Rebellion. While not endorsed by associated with the official versions of The Hunger Games films or novels, Cushion’s work has garnered a great amount of support from the fan community, and with one listen to his beautiful work, it becomes clear why.

Below, Cushion talks to Fanboy Comics President Bryant Dillon about how he got started with his very first Hunger Games score, his musical influences, and his upcoming releases!

This interview was conducted on Monday, September 12th, 2011.

 

The first half of Burn Notice’s latest season wrapped up for its fall break recently, and a retrospective of where the show’s been and where it’s going is in order. USA Network’s latest brace of shows that have been advertised and produced in a style similar to Burn Notice have caused some to unfairly overlook the escapades of renegade spy Michael Weston and his compatriots. On the surface Burn Notice is reminiscent of The A-Team, from the special ops charity of its main characters to its status quo “nothing ever changes” reset button that comes into play at the end of most episodes. When consumed an episode a week, it’s a devilishly clever show.

I could be wrong, but I think that I am the target demographic for DC’s reboot. I am a fan of comics, but I rarely buy single issues and have never seriously followed DC. As such, I am open to the idea of jettisoning years of convoluted backstory, so that I can follow a character. I don’t care that the Flash totally pants the Green Lantern in GL #630, and so the Green Lantern Corps has a grudge against all speedsters. The fact that Darkseid is really Wonder Woman’s uncle-in-law on her mother’s side doesn’t mean a thing to me. [ed: I’m pretty sure you just made all that up.] [Ben: That’s sort of the point.] [ed: This is a cheap and insulting way to pad this piece.] [Ben: Sorry.] The point is that I know a little bit about most of the more famous characters in the DCU, and I was really excited about the reboot.

The DC reboot is upon us, comic book sniffers! Welcome to the new DC universe! In an effort to help bring new readers into the world of comics, the Fanboy Comics staff has decided to review at least five new #1 issues each week of September, DC’s reboot launch month.

 

Red Lanterns #1 by Peter Milligan and pencilled by Ed Benes is another worthy edition to the DCnU and a great example of how to convey links to old continuity in a #1 issue which has the goal of snaring new readers. Red Lanterns #1 is also one of those rare comics that can appeal to more mature readers desiring quality storytelling while also maintaing enough action and violence to keep teenage attention spans in their appropriate moral decline! Nothing like a lead character with a mouthful of daggers to keep the kiddies in their seats!

SPOILERS BELOW

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