Mortifera Banner and with ReviewMortifera is the story of Catherine and Ethan Gregor and their ally, the demon Durin, as they hunt down the demon Kanisus and his army during the time period that is classically known as The Dark Ages.


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Demon Knights 10Fanboy Comics Contributor Jason Enright brings you his top comic book picks for the week.

 

 

Demon Knights
by Paul Cornell, Diogenes Neves, Julio Ferreira, and Oclair Albert

DC has quite a few really good books out this week. Batman and Green Lantern continue to tell great stories and sell tons of copies. Then, there’s Paul Cornell’s funky, little book about dragons, magic, and, of course, Demon Knights. This book is just pure fun. It has a wonderful cast of characters that are funny, devious, and heartwarming all at once. The action is epic, the art is incredible, and the unraveling mystery is deeply intriguing. Cornell has captured all the fun of playing a game like Dungeons & Dragons and managed to fit it into a nice, little corner of the DC Universe. We all know you pick those big titles I talked about before, but make sure you save 3 bucks to give Demon Knights a try.

Renae De LizWhen Fanboy Comics is not providing you with the latest in geek news and entertainment, the FBC staff and I hope to offer our readers a myriad of opportunities to give back to the community.  We love reading comics, watching movies, and playing video games, but we are never happier than when we are able to help others in need.  With Geeks Care: How You Can Help, FBC will provide you a variety of causes that would greatly appreciate your time.

Renae De Liz is many things: artist, writer, wife, and mother.  The staff of Fanboy Comics was absolutely in awe of her most recent creation, Womanthology, and we have been eager to learn more about all of her upcoming projects ever since.  When we learned that Renae was taken to the hospital with a very serious infection in her blood and kidneys, all the while with two little boys to take care of and no medical insurance, we knew that we wanted to help in any way that we could.

 

SW Knight Errant 1My love of Star Wars knows no bounds (I am literally sipping coffee from a Boba Fett mug as I write this.), but I always find myself at a constant struggle when it comes to the Expanded Universe. The EU is giving me what I am constantly craving, more Star Wars, but as I've been vocal about it in the past, the outcome is usually hit or miss in my eyes. I have to give credit to the artists out there who can actually bring us a solid story centered around characters we've never heard of before. My last review for Darth Vader and the Ghost Prison was a perfect example of EU done right. This first issue in a five-part series, Knight Errant: Escape, is a mixed bag for me.

 

The MassiveBrian Wood has fostered a reputation as a counter-culture comic creator. More Abbie Hoffman than R. Crumb, Wood seems to be interested in what happens after society has gotten out of the way of human nature. He has explored this with the excellent DMZ, which featured a new civil war, and in a slightly roundabout way with Channel Zero, where the characters willfully ignored a corrupt and broken society. Now, in The Massive, he shows what happens when the Earth has destroyed society as we know it.

I will now lightly spoil the SETTING of this comic!

MINOR SPOILERS

Exist TraceI CON't believe it! It's another CON interview by our intrepid Fanboy Comics reporter, J.C. Ciesielski!


This time it's with the lovely ladies of Exist+Trace, a Japanese Visual Kei band that will rock out not just your ears, but your eyes, as well. Be sure to check out their website at www.exist-trace.com. This interview took place at the 2012 Tekkoshocon Japanese Music and Anime convention in Pittsburgh, PA, land of bridges and pierogies. And now, on with the show! Domo!


 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here to download.

 

 

 

 

Jim Mahfood vs. Fanboy Comics

 

LA Ink StainsArtist/writer Jim Mahfood, aka Food One, talks with Fanboy Comics about Los Angeles Ink Stains published by Image Comics. Releasing June 20th, Ink Stains is the first printed edition collection of Jim Mahfood's autobiographical webcomic. The graphic memoir gives readers an insider's POV to the underground/lowbrow art scene unique to LA, and tells the story of one artistic hustler's rise to the middle. As emergent writer/performer Herbert Russell aptly states in the book's 6-page intro, "Ink Stains is bottomless baskets of adrenaline nachos shot through a peristaltic wave of hedonism, neurosis, and gonzo documentary."

 

 

 

 

 

Spiderman 38The Top Four series looks at certain aspects of the comic book world from two perspectives: Rob’s, as a relative newcomer to mainstream comics, and Kristine’s, as an older hand in the world.  Each installment evaluates the top four choices from both Rob and Kristine and why they chose their picks.



By Robert J. Baden and Kristine Chester

 

 

 

The standard unit of consumption for a comic is an issue, a 20 to 30-page helping that conveys part of a story arc while hooking readers to come back next month, while others are stand alone stories focusing on a single subject in the larger title.  Many of us have issues that we just love to read over and over again, that one most enjoyable part of a storyline or a profound issue separate from the rest of the series.  Here are several such issues for us, ones that we'll bend the pages back and reread many times over.

 

 

 

SPOILERS BELOW

 

 

DC-ComicsDear DC Comics:



I just wanted to let you know I am very disappointed. Last year, around this time, you announced your New 52 initiative. There was worry, speculation, anger, but mostly you got what you wanted: everyone was talking about DC Comics. Then, we started to get images, announcements of creative teams, and first covers, and an ice cold ball of dread started to form in the pit of my stomach. You see there was something sorely lacking. Something that had been lacking in comics for years, that I had hoped you would finally address.

BLONDERWITCH MTBy Michael Fitzgerald Troy

 

 

Thunderbolts is one of those titles that is always good when I read it, and I always drop off at some point for some unknown Bermuda Trianglesque reason.  Luckily, Thunderbolts has a history of re-inventing itself in fun and interesting ways, perhaps intentionally to bring back readers to the title.  They must be doing something right; numbered at #175 is unprecedented with rampant revisions and renumbering ruling the day. 

I should say here that I was a huge fan of the b@$tard child of Marvel's Civil War, Dark Avengers.  I was sorely disappointed when it was canceled after only 18 issues.  So, now it appears the latest Thunderbolts makeover comes in the form of a melding with the Dark Avengers concept. Color me intrigued.  I was initially drawn in by the beautiful cover by Mike Deidato, Jr. (That man can draw!) The cover did not prepare me for the surprise I was in for.


POSSIBLE SPOILERS

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